Module Catalogue

Modules at Bath Spa University are usually worth either 10, 20 or 40 credits.  If you are using the European Credit Transfer System (ECTS), you must always halve the Bath Spa University credits to get an accurate transfer to ECTS.  

E.g. 
10 Bath Spa University Credits = 5 ECTS
20 Bath Spa University Credits = 10 ECTS
40 Bath Spa University Credits = 20 ECTS

Please use the drop down lists below to view modules and their credit worth.  Students must always choose a minimum of 60 Bath Spa University credits (or 30 ECTS) when selecting modules per semester.

Art

Semester 1

AP4001-40 Introduction to 2D

DepartmentArt
Module TitleIntroduction to 2D
Module CodeAP4001-40SemesterOne
Study Hours44 contact/130 independent studyCredits20
Module DescriptionThis module is an introduction to contemporary painting and drawing practice. The module aims to develop your skills in both these areas. It will encourage you to explore the relationship between concepts and materials through a series of taught sessions, practical workshops and set projects. Regular seminars will identify key contemporary artists using drawing and painting as the basis for their studio practice and will introduce you to a variety of approaches to making, discussing and critiquing contemporary visual art. By emphasising the importance of practical research skills, we aim to develop your ability to contextualise your work. A series of seminars will explore ways of recording and communicating your ideas effectively through support materials – sketchbooks, notebooks and research folders.
Weekly CalendarWeekly taught workshops, technical demonstrations, group crits, academic forums.
BibliographySchwabsky, B (2004) Vitamin P: New Perspectives in Painting. London:Phaidon Press Ltd. Taylor, P (2004) Art Today. London: Laurence King Publishing Ltd. King, L. and Dexter, E. (2005) Vitamin D: New Perspectives in Drawing (Themes). London: Phaidon Press. Myers, T. (2011) Painting: Documents of Contemporary Art. London:Whitechapel Art Gallery. Aguirre, P. and Azimi, N. (2011) Vitamin P2: New Perspectives in Painting. London: Phaidon. Press, P. ( 2013) Vitamin D2: New Perspectives in Drawing. London: Phaidon. Heartney, E. (2013) Art and Today. London: Phaidon.
AssessmentCoursework 80% Essay or Presentation 20%

AP4002-40 Introduction to 3D - Ceramics and Sculpture

DepartmentArt
Module TitleIntroduction to 3D - Ceramics and Sculpture
Module CodeAP4002-40SemesterOne
Study Hours44 contact/130 independentCredits20
Module DescriptionThis module is a general introduction to contemporary visual art Sculpture and Ceramics (3D). The introductory programme to 3D is project based and aims to develop your fundamental skills in 3D sculpture and ceramics. It will introduce you to the relationship between idea and materials, and will help you to identify if your work is concerned with form, materials, concept or context. Running alongside these practical workshop introductions are research sessions, lectures and seminars. By emphasising the importance of practical research skills, we aim to develop your ability to contextualise your own work. A series of seminars will explore ways of recording and communicating your ideas effectively through support materials – sketchbooks, notebooks and research folders.
Weekly CalendarWeekly taught workshops, technical demonstrations, group crits, academic forums.
BibliographyRosenthal, N (1998) Young British Artists from the Saatchi Collection. London: Thames & Hudson. Pedrosa, A. and Hoptman, L. (2009) Vitamin 3-D: New Perspectives in Sculpture and Installation. London: Phaidon Press. Cooper, E. (2009) Contemporary Ceramics. London:Thames & Hudson.
AssessmentCoursework 80% Essay or Presentation 20%

AP4003-40 Introduction to Mixed Media Textiles

DepartmentArt
Module TitleIntroduction to Mixed Media Textiles
Module CodeAP4003-40SemesterOne
Study Hours44 contact/130 independentCredits20
Module DescriptionThis module is a general introduction to the subject of Mixed Media Textiles. Students will be introduced to a range of disciplines, which will include developing basic technical skills and the development of drawing and three-dimensional work. There are also projects in printed, knitted, woven and embroidered textiles. The module aims to develop your skills creatively within a wide range of materials and techniques and to help you gain confidence in each area so that you are able to develop your own ideas and work independently. You will be expected to explore and investigate surfaces, textures, linear forms, colour, scale and pattern. Students are encouraged to initiate and develop drawing skills through both independent and project based work. Practical research skills and an ability to record and communicate ideas effectively will be developed through sketchbooks and journals, and you will also be asked to produce a short PowerPoint presentation.
Weekly CalendarWeekly taught workshops, technical demonstrations, group crits, academic forums.
BibliographyLeitner, C. (2005) Paper Textiles: A&C Black. London: Prestel. Batsford, W. (2003) The Art of Manipulating Fabric. Lola: Krause Publications. Fereday, G. (2003) Natural Dyes. London: British Museum Press. Journals: Selvedge (2014) Crafts, Embroidery, Bloom and View on Colour. London: Selvedge.
AssessmentCoursework 80% Essay or Presentation 20%

AP4006-20 Introduction to Photography

DepartmentArt
Module TitleIntroduction to Photography
Module CodeAP4006-20SemesterOne
Study Hours22 contact/63 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionThis module is a general introduction to photography and will introduce you to the studios, equipment and processes used in making both ‘analogue’ (film-based) and digital photographic images as part of contemporary art practice. The module aims to develop your fundamental skills in these areas and to introduce you to industry standard equipment and software. Throughout the module you will be encouraged to expand your skills and develop your ideas within the framework of a series of set projects. By emphasising the importance of your practical research skills, we aim to develop your ability to contextualise your photographic work, and to record and communicate your ideas effectively through a professional context research folder. For the final assessment you will be asked to write a short reflection on your progress throughout the module, this must be included in your research folder. Through a series of seminars on major photographers and their work you will be introduced to a variety of approaches and ideas relevant to contemporary photographic practice.
Weekly CalendarWeekly taught workshops, technical demonstrations, group crits, academic forums.
BibliographySontag, S. (1979) On Photography. London: Penguin. Wells, L. (2004) Photography: A Critical Introduction. London: Routledge. Cotton, C (2004) The Photograph as Contemporary Art: World of Art. London: Thames & Hudson.
AssessmentCoursework 80% Presentation 20%

AP5001-40 2D - Practice and Context

DepartmentArt
Module Title2D - Practice and Context
Module CodeAP5001-40SemesterOne
Study Hours33 contact/142 independentCredits20
Module DescriptionThis module aims to encourage you to identify and develop your practical and critical skills through your chosen area of artistic practice and theoretical study. Areas of studio practice in which you might work include: drawing, painting, performance, photography, video, animation and printmaking. At the beginning of this module you will be asked to submit a proposal outlining an intended area of investigation that relates to your studio practice. The proposal will be discussed with tutors and a plan of study and research agreed. You will then be expected to work independently in your chosen area of practice, supported by seminars, group critiques and individual tutorials.
Weekly CalendarWeekly taught workshops, technical demonstrations, group crits, academic forums.
BibliographySaff, D. and Sacilotto, D. (1978) Printmaking: History and Process. Belmont: Wadsworth Publishing Co Inc. Smith, A. (2004) Etching: A Guide to Traditional Techniques. London: The Crowood Press Ltd. Mack, M. (1997) Surface: Contemporary Photographic Practice. Berkeley: Gingko Pr Inc. Richter, G.(1995) The Daily Practice of Painting. Cambridge: The MIT Press. Gablik, S. (1985) Has Modernism Failed?. London: Thames and Hudson Ltd. Lippard, L. (1997) Six Years: The Dematerialization of the Art Object from 1966 to 1972. California: University of California Press. Tate, (1999) Abracadabra: International Contemporary Art. London: Tate Gallery Publishing. De Oliveira, N. (1996) Installation Art. London: Thames & Hudson. Buck, L. (2007) Moving Targets 2: A User's Guide to British Art Now. London: Tate Publishing. Weintraub, L. (2003) Making Contemporary Art: How Today's Artists Think and Work. London: Thames and Hudson Ltd.
AssessmentCoursework 80% Essay and proposal 20%

AP5002-40 3D Practice and Context

DepartmentArt
Module Title3D - Practice and Context
Module CodeAP5002-40SemesterOne
Study Hours33 contact/142 independentCredits20
Module DescriptionThis module aims to encourage you to identify and develop your practical and critical skills through your chosen area of studio practice and theoretical study. Areas of studio practice in which you might work include: Ceramics and Sculpture. At the beginning of this module you will be asked to submit a proposal outlining an intended area of investigation that relates to your studio practice. The proposal will be discussed with tutors and a plan of study and research agreed. You will then be expected to work independently in your chosen area of practice, supported by seminars, group critiques and individual tutorials. We aim to encourage and develop your ability to contextualise your work, and to record and communicate your ideas effectively through a professional context research folder. This document should relate to the area of studio practice you have chosen to undertake in this module. Your individual program of research and studio practice will be supported by lectures and seminars investigating ways in which makers and historians have used a range of ideas and theoretical frameworks to contextualise and discuss contemporary studio practice in terms of craft, materiality and space.
Weekly CalendarWeekly taught workshops, technical demonstrations, group crits, academic forums.
BibliographyBishop, C (2011) Installation Art. London: Tate. Wardell, S. (2007) Slipcasting: Ceramics Handbook. Pennsylvania: University of Pennsylvania Press. Vincentelli, M (2000) Women and Ceramics: Gendered Vessels. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
AssessmentCoursework 80% Essay and proposal 20%

AP5003-40 Advanced Textiles

DepartmentArt
Module TitleAdvanced Textiles
Module CodeAP5003-40SemesterOne
Study Hours33 contact/142 independentCredits20
Module DescriptionThe aim of this module is to enable you to extend and develop your practical and creative skills through both workshop based and independent study. Through working across the disciplines you will be encouraged to cross the conventional boundaries of techniques and materials to create mixed media textiles that are innovative and original. You will be able to develop visual communication skills through drawing and exploring materials to create both 2D and 3D work. Creative textile workshops will be available in printed, knitted, embroidered and woven textiles. At the beginning of the semester you will be asked to write your own proposal of work, which outlines the underlying ideas and inspiration for the module, and will identify the various media and techniques that you wish to develop. You will be encouraged to consider ethical, social and environmental issues as an important element of your practice. You will be asked to present a reflective journal, which includes lecture notes and research as a record of the lecture series, and from gallery and exhibition visits, and an illustrated oral presentation. This will help to develop your critical and contextual awareness alongside your communication, writing IT and presentation skills.
Weekly CalendarWeekly taught workshops, technical demonstrations, group crits, academic forums.
BibliographyKendall, T. (2011) The Fabric & Yarn Dyers Handbook. London: Collins & Brown. Revere, D. McFadden J. and Edwards, S. (2008) Radical Lace & Subversive Knitting. London: ACC Editions. Miller, L. (2005) The Textile Vision of Reiko Sudo and Nuno. Farnham: University College for the Creative Arts at Canterbury, Epsom, Farnham, Maidstone and Rochester. Dixon, A. (2007) Handweaver’s Pattern Book: The Essential Illustrated Guide To Over 600 Fabric Weaves. London: A & C Black Publishers Ltd. Jefferies, J., Quinn, B. and Monem, N. (2008) Contemporary Textiles: The Fabric of Fine Art. London: Black Dog Publishing
AssessmentCoursework 80% Essay and proposal 20%

FA4121-40 Studio Practice 1 (a)

DepartmentArt
Module TitleStudio Practice 1(a)
Module CodeFA4121-40SemesterOne
Study Hours44 contact/130 independentCredits40
AbstractThis module is designed to introduce you to a range of ideas, possibilities and techniques in Fine Art. With guidance from academic staff, you are encouraged to work independently on self-initiated studio practice that evidences the learning outcomes. You are required to begin establishing a research context for your work, and to keep a context folder that places independent artwork within the context of historical and contemporary practice, and a reflective journal that regularly evaluates and logs your progress.
Weekly CalendarWeekly one to one tutorial with your personal tutor. Occasional one to one tutorials with other members of academic staff. Visiting Lecture each week. Sign-up opportunity for academic workshops and group forums.
BibliographyCollins J, Sculpture Today. Phaidon 2007 Buck, L, Moving Targets 2. Tate Gallery Pub, 200 De Oliveira, N, Installation Art. Thames & Hudson, 199 Godfrey, T, Painting Today. Phaidon Press 200 Godfrey, T, Conceptual Art. Phaidon Press, 1998Hindle, Y & Seymour, P, Paint Theory, Paint Practice: Materials and Methodologies within Contemporary Painting Practice. Lee Pr, 2000
Assessment80% coursework 20% context folder

FA4161-20 Professional Practice 1

DepartmentArt
Module TitleProfessional Practice 1
Module CodeFA4161-20SemesterOne
Study Hours22 contact/63 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionThis module is designed to develop and enhance professional practice and skills. It will help you prepare for a career within the sector after graduation by actively defining your future career path or possible future study. It will provide you with an understanding of good time management and will equip you with the necessary skills to produce a professional digital archive of your practice. Students will be expected to attend obligatory workshops in digital photography.
Weekly CalendarWeekly one to one tutorial with your personal tutor. Occasional one to one tutorials with other members of academic staff. Visiting Lecture each week. Sign-up opportunity for academic workshops and group forums.
BibliographyRugaff, R. The Painting of Modern Life: 1960s to Now.. Hayward Publishing 2008. Benjamin, W. Illuminations Cape, 1970, & Pimlico, 1999. Barthes, W. Camera Lucida . Cape, 1982.
AssessmentDigital Portfolio 100%

FA5122-40 Studio Practice 2 (a)

DepartmentArt
Module TitleStudio Practice 2a
Module CodeFA5122-40SemesterOne
Study Hours33 contact/142 independentCredits40
AbstractStudio Practice 2a aims to enable students to identify and develop a self-critical direction for their independent practice and to produce a body of work for assessment. A negotiated programme of individual work is developed by the student and supported by academic staff. The development of this individual programme of study is supported through; studio based one to one tutorials and group critiques with a range of academic staff, technical instruction, visits to exhibitions, external projects and lectures. Presentations and lectures are scheduled throughout the module in addition to and in support of a broader contextual awareness of the students practice. Visiting artists, curators, directors and other art professionals will give talks and workshops across the whole spectrum of contemporary art activity throughout the duration of the module.
Weekly CalendarFortnightly one to one tutorial with your personal tutor. Fortnightly one to one tutorial with another member of academic staff. Visiting Lecture each week Sign-up opportunity for academic workshops and group forums.
BibliographyRugaff R, The Painting of Modern Life: 1960s to Now.. Hayward Publishing 2008. Benjamin, W, Illuminations Cape, 1970, & Pimlico, 1999. Barthes, R, Camera Lucida . Cape, 1982.
AssessmentCoursework 80% Context folder 20%

FA5161-20 Professional Practice 2

DepartmentArt
Module TitleProfessional Practice 2
Module CodeFA5161-20SemesterOne
Study Hours22 contact/63 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionThis module is designed to develop and enhance professional practice and skills, and increase an understanding of the workings of the student’s chosen specialist area in order to ensure that they are appropriately prepared for a career within their sector, and to actively define their future career path and possible future study. The module will provide students with the opportunity to produce professional literature and a digital portfolio demonstrating a clear understanding of the part they play in self-promotion and employability. The ability to critically analyse and select appropriate content is seen as a vital skill in the development of a professionally representative portfolio. Students will gain experience in various marketing strategies and undertake a series of professional promotional literary tasks with experience of applying for residencies, competitions, writing a curriculum vitae and approaching galleries. As a means of articulating your objectives and evidencing your engagement with contemporary art you will be required to give a formal presentation contextualizing your independent studio practice.
Weekly CalendarAcademic workshops and technical demonstrations; Group forums; Lectures and seminars; Digital networking forums and workshops.
BibliographyAgainst Interpretation and Other Essays. Octopus, 1978. O'Doherty, B, Inside the White Cube: the Ideology of the Gallery Space . Lapis Press, 1976.
AssessmentPresentation of work in context 60% Digital portfolio 40%

Semester 2

AP4002-40 Introduction to 3D - Ceramics and Sculpture

DepartmentArt
Module TitleIntroduction to 3D - Ceramics and Sculpture
Module CodeAP4002-40SemesterTwo
Study Hours56 contact/166 independentCredits20
Module DescriptionThis module is a general introduction to contemporary visual art Sculpture and Ceramics (3D). The introductory programme to 3D is project based and aims to develop your fundamental skills in 3D sculpture and ceramics. It will introduce you to the relationship between idea and materials, and will help you to identify if your work is concerned with form, materials, concept or context. Running alongside these practical workshop introductions are research sessions, lectures and seminars. By emphasising the importance of practical research skills, we aim to develop your ability to contextualise your own work. A series of seminars will explore ways of recording and communicating your ideas effectively through support materials – sketchbooks, notebooks and research folders.
Weekly CalendarWeekly taught workshops, technical demonstrations, group crits, academic forums.
BibliographyRosenthal, N. (1998) Sensation: Young British Artists from the Saatchi Collection. London: Thames & Hudson. Pedrosa, A. and Hoptman, L. (2009) Vitamin 3-D: New Perspectives in Sculpture and Installation. London: Phaidon Press. Cooper, E. (2009) Contemporary Ceramics. London:Thames & Hudson.
AssessmentCoursework 80% Essay or Presentation 20%

AP4003-40 Introduction to Mixed Media Textiles

DepartmentArt
Module TitleIntroduction to Mixed Media Textiles
Module CodeAP4003-40SemesterTwo
Study Hours56 contact/166 independentCredits20
Module DescriptionThis module is a general introduction to the subject of Mixed Media Textiles. Students will be introduced to a range of disciplines, which will include developing basic technical skills and the development of drawing and three-dimensional work. There are also projects in printed, knitted, woven and embroidered textiles. The module aims to develop your skills creatively within a wide range of materials and techniques and to help you gain confidence in each area so that you are able to develop your own ideas and work independently. You will be expected to explore and investigate surfaces, textures, linear forms, colour, scale and pattern. Students are encouraged to initiate and develop drawing skills through both independent and project based work. Practical research skills and an ability to record and communicate ideas effectively will be developed through sketchbooks and journals, and you will also be asked to produce a short PowerPoint presentation.
Weekly CalendarWeekly taught workshops, technical demonstrations, group crits, academic forums.
BibliographyLeitner, C. (2005) Paper Textiles: A&C Black. London: Prestel. Batsford, W. (2003) The Art of Manipulating Fabric. Lola: Krause Publications. Fereday, G. (2003) Natural Dyes. London: British Museum Press. Journals: Selvedge (2014) Crafts, Embroidery, Bloom and View on Colour. London: Selvedge.
AssessmentCoursework 80% Essay or Presentation 20%

AP4005-20 Introduction to Silkscreen Printing

DepartmentArt
Module TitleIntroduction to Silkscreen Printing
Module CodeAP4005-20SemesterTwo
Study Hours28 contact/80 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionThis module is a 13-week introduction to silkscreen printing that will encourage you to explore a variety of ideas, processes, materials and equipment associated with contemporary silkscreen printing. Over the course of the module you will be encouraged to expand your skills and develop your ideas within the framework of group and individual set projects. You will explore and develop your ideas through careful research recorded in sketchbooks and notebooks. Through a series of lectures on contemporary printmaking practice you will be introduced to a variety of approaches and ideas relevant to printmaking and its place within contemporary art practice.
Weekly CalendarWeekly taught workshops, technical demonstrations, group crits, academic forums.
BibliographyWilliamson, C. (2011) Reinventing Screen Printing. London: A&C Black. Newell, J. and Wittington, D. (2011) Monoprinting. London: A&C Black. Miles, R. and Saunders, G. (2006) Prints Now: Directions and Definitions. London: V&A Publications
AssessmentCoursework 80% Presentation 20%

AP4007-20 Introduction to Moving Image

DepartmentArt
Module TitleIntroduction to the Moving Image
Module CodeAP4007-20SemesterTwo
Study Hours28 contact/80 independentCredits10
AbstractThis module is a general introduction to video and animation and will introduce you to the studios, equipment and processes used in making videos and animation as part of contemporary arts practice. The module aims to develop your fundamental skills in this area and to introduce you to industry standard software and equipment. Over the course of the module you will be encouraged to expand your skills and develop your ideas within the framework of a series of collaborative and individual set projects.
Weekly CalendarWeekly taught workshops, technical demonstrations, group crits, academic forums.
BibliographyRoss, D., Hall, D. and Jo S. (2004) Illuminating Video: An Essential Guide to Video Art. New York: Aperture. Elwes, C. (1991) Video Art: A Guided Tour. New York: I. B Tauris. Rush, M. (2005) New Media in Art. London:Thames and Hudson.
AssessmentCoursework 80% Presentation 20%

AP5001-40 2D Practice and Context

DepartmentArt
Module Title2D - Practice and Context
Module CodeAP5001-40SemesterTwo
Study Hours42 contact/180 independentCredits20
AbstractThis module aims to encourage you to identify and develop your practical and critical skills through your chosen area of artistic practice and theoretical study. Areas of studio practice in which you might work include: drawing, painting, performance, photography, video, animation and printmaking. At the beginning of this module you will be asked to submit a proposal outlining an intended area of investigation that relates to your studio practice. The proposal will be discussed with tutors and a plan of study and research agreed. You will then be expected to work independently in your chosen area of practice, supported by seminars, group critiques and individual tutorials.
Weekly CalendarWeekly taught workshops, technical demonstrations, group crits, academic forums.
BibliographySaff, D. and Sacilotto, D. (1978) Printmaking: History and Process. Belmont: Wadsworth Publishing Co Inc. Smith, A. (2004) Etching:A Guide to Traditional Techniques. London: The Crowood Press Ltd. Mack, M. (1997) Surface: Contemporary Photographic Practice. Berkeley: Gingko Pr Inc. Richter, G.(1995) The Daily Practice of Painting. Cambridge: The MIT Press. Gablik, S. (1985) Has Modernism Failed? London: Thames and Hudson Ltd. Lippard, L. (1997) Six Years: The Dematerialization of the Art Object from 1966 to 1972. California: University of California Press. Tate, (1999) Abracadabra: International Contemporary Art. London: Tate Gallery Publishing. De Oliveira, N. (1996) Installation Art. London: Thames & Hudson. Buck, L. (2007) Moving Targets 2: A User's Guide to British Art Now. London: Tate Publishing. Weintraub, L. (2003) Making Contemporary Art: How Today's Artists Think and Work. London: Thames and Hudson Ltd.
AssessmentCoursework 80% Essay and proposal 20%

AP5002-40 3D Practice and Context

DepartmentArt
Module Title3D - Practice and Context
Module CodeAP5002-40SemesterTwo
Study Hours42 contact/180 independentCredits20
Module DescriptionThis module aims to encourage you to identify and develop your practical and critical skills through your chosen area of studio practice and theoretical study. Areas of studio practice in which you might work include: Ceramics and Sculpture. At the beginning of this module you will be asked to submit a proposal outlining an intended area of investigation that relates to your studio practice. The proposal will be discussed with tutors and a plan of study and research agreed. You will then be expected to work independently in your chosen area of practice, supported by seminars, group critiques and individual tutorials. We aim to encourage and develop your ability to contextualise your work, and to record and communicate your ideas effectively through a professional context research folder. This document should relate to the area of studio practice you have chosen to undertake in this module. Your individual program of research and studio practice will be supported by lectures and seminars investigating ways in which makers and historians have used a range of ideas and theoretical frameworks to contextualise and discuss contemporary studio practice in terms of craft, materiality and space.
Weekly CalendarWeekly taught workshops, technical demonstrations, group crits, academic forums.
BibliographyBishop, C (2011) Installation Art. London: Tate. Wardell, S. (2007) Slipcasting: Ceramics Handbook. Pennsylvania: University of Pennsylvania Press. Vincentelli, M (2000) Women and Ceramics: Gendered Vessels. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
AssessmentCoursework 80% Essay and proposal 20%

AP5003-40 Advanced Textiles

DepartmentArt
Module TitleAdvanced Textiles
Module CodeAP5003-40SemesterTwo
Study Hours42 contact/180 independentCredits20
Module DescriptionThe aim of this module is to enable you to extend and develop your practical and creative skills through both workshop based and independent study. Through working across the disciplines you will be encouraged to cross the conventional boundaries of techniques and materials to create mixed media textiles that are innovative and original. You will be able to develop visual communication skills through drawing and exploring materials to create both 2D and 3D work. Creative textile workshops will be available in printed, knitted, embroidered and woven textiles. At the beginning of the semester you will be asked to write your own proposal of work, which outlines the underlying ideas and inspiration for the module, and will identify the various media and techniques that you wish to develop. You will be encouraged to consider ethical, social and environmental issues as an important element of your practice. You will be asked to present a reflective journal, which includes lecture notes and research as a record of the lecture series, and from gallery and exhibition visits, and an illustrated oral presentation. This will help to develop your critical and contextual awareness alongside your communication, writing IT and presentation skills.
Weekly CalendarWeekly taught workshops, technical demonstrations, group crits, academic forums.
BibliographyKendall, T. (2011) The Fabric & Yarn Dyers Handbook. London: Collins Brown. Revere, D. McFadden J. and Edwards, S. (2008) Radical Lace & Subversive Knitting. London: ACC Editions. Miller, L. (2005) The Textile Vision of Reiko Sudo and Nuno. Farnham: University College for the Creative Arts at Canterbury, Epsom, Farnham, Maidstone and Rochester. Dixon, A. (2007) Handweaver’s Pattern Book: The Essential Illustrated Guide To Over 600 Fabric Weaves. London: A & C Black Publishers Ltd. Jefferies, J., Quinn, B. and Monem, N. (2008) Contemporary Textiles: The Fabric of Fine Art. London: Black Dog Publishing.
AssessmentCoursework 80% Essay and proposal 20%

FA4161-20 Professional Practice 1

DepartmentArt
Module TitleProfessional Practice 1
Module CodeFA4161-20SemesterTwo
Study Hours28 contact/80 independentCredits10
AbstractThis module is designed to develop and enhance professional practice and skills. It will help you prepare for a career within the sector after graduation by actively defining your future career path or possible future study. It will provide you with an understanding of good time management and will equip you with the necessary skills to produce a professional digital archive of your practice. Students will be expected to attend obligatory workshops in digital photography. The module will require students to put their experience into practice by embarking on a ‘real life’ project, producing work to commission, or producing work that is site specific, or work that requires you to collaborate with others, or curate and/or project manage an event of your choosing.
Weekly CalendarWeekly one to one tutorial with your personal tutor. Occasional one to one tutorials with other members of academic staff. Visiting Lecture each week. Sign-up opportunity for academic workshops and group forums.
BibliographyBois A.Y; Buchlow B; Foster H; Krauss R. Art Since 1900: Modernism, Antimodernism, Postmodernism. Thames & Hudson, 2004. Meecham P; Sheldon J. Modern Art: A Critical Introduction. Routledge, 2000.
AssessmentExternal Project 100%

FA4221-40 Studio Practice 1b

DepartmentArt
Module TitleStudio Practice 1b
Module CodeFA4221-40SemesterTwo
Study Hours56 contact/166 independentCreditsTBC
Module DescriptionThis practice-based studio module requires you to develop studio practice in the studio with your self-initiated exploration and development of your individual practice toward a focussed and directed body of work. With continuing guidance from academic staff, you will be encouraged to work independently on studio practice with a growing confidence. At the end of the module you are required to submit a well-researched context for your work in the form of a context folder and will maintain a reflective journal that logs and evaluates your progress throughout the modules duration.
Weekly CalendarWeekly one to one tutorial with your personal tutor. Occasional one to one tutorials with other members of academic staff. Visiting Lecture each week. Sign-up opportunity for academic workshops and group forums throughout the semester.
BibliographyGoldberg, R, Performance Art. Thames & Hudson, 1986 Meyer, James, Minimalism. Phaidon Press, 2000 Reckitt, Helena, Art & Feminism. Phaidon Press, 2001 Schwabsky B, Vitamin P : New Perspectives in Painting. Phaidon 2002 Vitamin P2, Phaidon 2011 Dexter E, Vitamin D – New Perspectives in Drawing. Phaidon
Assessment80% coursework 20% context folder

FA5123-40 Studio Practice 2 (b)

DepartmentArt
Module TitleStudio Practice 2b
Module CodeFA5123-40SemesterTwo
Study Hours42 contact/180 independentCredits40
Module DescriptionThis module focuses on the development of a resolved body of artwork. Studio work aims to enable students to identify and develop a clear, self-critical direction for their practice and to make a body of work for an exhibition. Students are also required to evidence an understanding and engagement of historical and contemporary context pertinent to their own studio practice. A negotiated programme of individual work is developed by the student and supported by academic staff. The development of this individual programme of study is supported through; studio based one to one tutorials and group critiques with a range of academic staff, technical instruction, visits to exhibitions, external projects and lecture. Students are offered the opportunity to take part in an internal/external exhibition. Presentations are scheduled throughout the module in addition to and in support of a broader contextual awareness of the students practice. Visiting artists, curators, directors and other art professionals will give talks and workshops across the whole spectrum of contemporary art activity throughout the duration of the module.
Weekly CalendarFortnightly one to one tutorial with your personal tutor. Fortnightly one to one tutorial with another member of academic staff. Visiting Lecture each week Sign-up opportunity for academic workshops and group forums
BibliographyImage Music Text, Fontana, 1977. Mythologies, Vintage London 2000. Doherty, C, Edit. Contemporary Art from Studio to Situation. Putman J, Art & Artefact: The Museum of Medium. Thames & Hudson 2002.
AssessmentCoursework 80% Context folder 20%

FA5161-20 Professional Practice 2

DepartmentArt
Module TitleProfessional Practice 2
Module CodeFA5161-20SemesterTBC
Study Hours28 contact/80 independentCreditsTBC
Module DescriptionThis module is designed to develop and enhance professional practice and skills, and increase an understanding of the workings of the student’s chosen specialist area in order to ensure that they are appropriately prepared for a career within their sector, and to actively define their future career path and possible future study. The module will provide students with an understanding of, and confidence in, a range of issues which will directly affect them during their search for future employment or self-employment, and the subsequent development of a career. It will, for example, deal with issues about marketing, finance and personal development together with issues relating to legislation affecting the profession, and develop the student’s understanding of their responsibilities with legal, moral and ethical codes of practice.
Weekly CalendarAcademic workshops and technical demonstrations; Group forums; Lectures and seminars; Digital networking forums and workshops.
BibliographyAgainst Interpretation and Other Essays. Octopus, 1978. O'Doherty, B, Inside the White Cube: the Ideology of the Gallery Space . Lapis Press, 1976.
AssessmentExternal Project 100%

Art History

Semester 1

CX4152-20 Contextual Studies 1

DepartmentArt History
Module TitleContextual Studies 1
Module CodeCX4152-20SemesterOne
Study Hours22 contact/63 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionThe main themes and issues considered in this module are: Major trends in the production and reception of art theories and practices in Europe and America since 1900. The notion of cultural politics with reference to specific instances of nationalism, ethnicity and gender. The construction of ‘traditions’ and the appropriation of received images and styles. The role of the myth of modernity and progress in the formulation of theories and styles. Art as commodity: galleries and market forces. ‘Novelty’ and ‘Authenticity’ as criteria in art production and criticism. Methods of interpretation and analysis are introduced through consideration of specific examples which represent key issues in visual culture.
Weekly CalendarInformation to follow
BibliographyBaxandall, M. (1987) Patterns of Intention: on the historical explanation of pictures. New Haven: Yale University Press Harrison C & Wood P, (1992) Art In Theory , Oxford: Blackwell, Sandler I, (1996), Art of the Postmodern Era From the late 1960s to the early 1990s, New York: Icon Editions, Harper Collins, (see especially chapters 7, 13 and 15) Stangos N, (1994), Concepts of Modern Art: From Fauvism To Postmodernism, London: Thames & Hudson, Appignanesi R, (1986), Freud for Beginners, London: Writers & Readers, Clarke T J, (1984), The Painting of Modern Life, London: Thames & Hudson, Dormer P (ed), (1997),The Culture of Craft, Manchester: MUP Druckery T (ed), (1997), Electronic Culture: Technology and Visual Representation, Aperture, Smith P and Wilde C A, (2002), Companion to Art Theory, Blackwell Baxandall, M. (1987) Patterns of Intention: on the historical explanation of pictures. New Haven: Yale University Press Harrison C & Wood P. Sandler, I. (1996) Art In Theory. Oxford: OUP. Harper, C. (1997) Art of the Postmodern Era From the late 1960s to the early 1990s. New York: Icon Editions (see especially chapters 7, 13 and 15) Stangos, N. (1994) Concepts of Modern Art: From Fauvism To Postmodernism. London: Thames & Hudson. Appignanesi, R. (1986), Freud for Beginners. London: Writers & Readers. Clarke, T. (1984), The Painting of Modern Life. London: Thames & Hudson. Dormer, P. (1997) The Culture of Craft. Manchester: MUP. Druckery, T. (1997), Electronic Culture: Technology and Visual Representation. London: Aperture. Smith, P. and Wilde, C. (2002), Companion to Art Theory. London: Blackwell.
AssessmentEssay - History and Theory 100%

Biology

Semester 1

BY 4501-40 Introduction to Biological Sciences

DepartmentBiology
Module TitleIntroduction to Biological Sciences
Module CodeBY4501-40SemesterOne
Study Hours44 contact/130 independentCredits20
Module DescriptionThis module is designed to develop skills and knowledge needed to study Biology. It offers a broad introduction to the nature of living things, and includes the themes of biological organisation and structure, evolution and classification, population biology and cell biology. This wide range of key concepts are unified by the fundamental processes needed to sustain life, which are illustrated using practical examples and ‘real world’ applications. The module also aims to give students an awareness of scientific and critical thinking, as well as the transferable skills sought by potential employers.
Weekly CalendarIntroduction to biological organisation; Evolution and origin of the species; Scientific thinking and scientific writing; Population growth and human populations; Classification; focus on micro-organisms; Basic lab techniques; light microscopy ID skills – microbiology; Microbiology and disease; Introduction to fungi; Data analysis; Introduction to descriptive statistics; DNA structure and analysis; Electrophoresis, Genetics; Cell theory and cell ultrastructure; Cell division; Growth, maintenance and reproduction.
BibliographyHogg, S. (2005) Essential Microbiology. Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell. Johnson, S. and Scott, J. (2009) Study Skills for the Biosciences. Oxford: OUP. Raven, P., Johnson, G.B., Losos, J.B. and Singer, S.R. (2010) Biology 10th Edition. New York: McGraw-Hill.
AssessmentSkills Self-assessment and scientific writing exercise (PDP) 20%., Practical File Exercise on data analysis 20%, Topic Review 30%, Multi-choice Test 30%

BY4502-20 Biodiversity and Conservation

DepartmentBiology
Module TitleBiodiversity and Conservation
Module CodeBY4502-20SemesterOne
Study Hours22 contact/63 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionThis module introduces the rich diversity of organisms in the biological world and conservation issues relating to them. It explores modern classification of species and highlights the key biological characteristics of the major plant phyla. It also reviews factors that influence where plants and animals are found with a particular focus on woodland flora and fauna. Biodiversity surveying techniques will be introduced and used as a means of determining such factors.
Weekly CalendarWoodland survey introduction; Woodland survey; Classification of organisms; Methods of Identification: Plants; Plants: Conquest of the Land; Woodland project review of results; Plants: Angiosperm diversity; Algae.
BibliographyJeffries, M.J. (2005) Biodiversity and Conservation. London: Routledge . Margulis, L. and Schwartz, K.V. (1998) Five Kingdoms: An Illustrated Guide to the Phyla of Life on Earth. 3rd Ed. New York: Freeman & Co. Raven, P., Johnson, G.B., Losos, J.B. and Singer, S.R. (2010) Biology. 10th Ed. New York: McGraw – Hill Education. Tudge, C. (2002) The Variety of Life. Oxford: OUP.
AssessmentEssay (60%) Practical report (40%)

BY4503-20 Human Biology

DepartmentBiology
Module TitleHuman Biology
Module CodeBY4503-20SemesterOne
Study Hours22 contact/63 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionYou will encompass human cell biology and genetics in developing your understanding of the human body, and will also have the opportunity to explore how the body reacts to disease and illness (pathology) and how diseases can be prevented or treated. In addition, the module will explore how detailed knowledge of human biology is put to use in society. In doing this, you will have the opportunity to explore the biology of humans through a series of exciting contemporary biological issues such as stem cell research, and genetic analyses.
Weekly CalendarThis module begins by examining human cells and cell division, as well as inheritance and how this relates to genetic disease and the study of cells in stem cell research. It then moves on to look at some key body systems such as the brain and spinal cord.
BibliographyRaven, P., Johnson, G.B., Losos, J.B. and Singer, S.R. (2010) Biology. 10th Ed. New York: McGraw – Hill Education
AssessmentPractical File (50%). Investigative Report (50%)

BY5501-40 Biology: The Science of Life - Botany

DepartmentBiology
Module TitleBiology: The Science of Life - Botany
Module CodeBY5501-40SemesterOne
Study Hours33 contact/142 independentCredits20
Module DescriptionThis module examines many aspects of the biology of plants. You will investigate aspects of plant physiology, biochemistry, structure, growth and development, and adaptation to a range of abiotic factors (e.g. light, water, temperature). Plant interactions with other organisms are also explored in student-led presentations towards the end of the programme.
Weekly CalendarPlant physiology; photosynthesis; plant growth and development; seed biology; plant tropisms; plants and minerals; plants and water; flowers and sex; plants and stress; plant biotic interactions.
BibliographyEvert, R. and Eichhorn, S. (2013) Raven Biology of Plants. 8th Ed. Wisconsin: WH Freeman and Company Publishers. Lack, A. and Evans, D. (2005) Instant Notes in Plant Biology. 2nd Ed. Oxford: Taylor & Francis. Scott, P. (2008) Physiology and Behaviour of Plants. Chichester: John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
AssessmentPlant practical write up (50%), Plant interpretative test (50%)

BY5505-20 Ecology

DepartmentBiology
Module TitleEcology
Module CodeBY5505-20SemesterOne
Study Hours22 contact/63 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionThis module aims to provide a theoretical and practical understanding of ecology. It examines the importance and complexity of interactions between individuals, populations, communities and the abiotic environment. To this end, a range of ecological principles are studied, including: ecological interactions and strategies, predator-prey interactions and herbivory.
Weekly CalendarEcological interactions and strategies; Soils and nutrients; Effects of herbivory including practical investigation; Plant defences; Predator responses to prey abundance; Predator functional response practical; Foraging decisions and competition; Predation and communities.
BibliographyBegon, M., Townsend, C. and Harper, J. (2005) Ecology: Individuals, Populations and Communities. 4th Ed. Oxford: Blackwell. Crawley, M.J. (1983) Herbivory: The Dynamics of Animal-Plant Interactions. Oxford: Blackwell. Krebs, JR. and Davies, NB. (1997) Behavioural Ecology: An Evolutionary Approach. 4th Ed. Oxford: Blackwell.
AssessmentPractical report (80%) Interpretative review (20%)

BY5507-20 Applied Microbiology

DepartmentBiology
Module TitleApplied Microbiology
Module CodeBY5507-20SemesterOne
Study Hours22 contact/63 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionThis module will cover the growth, metabolism and diversity of micro-organisms, and their relevance to the environment, to health and to industry. The module beings by reviewing the diversity and classification of microbes. The module will primarily focus on bacteria but will include discussion of fungi, algae and viruses. You will then cover microbial growth and metabolism before a review of microbial genetics including the introduction of genetic variation, which is critical to the success of this group of organisms.
Weekly CalendarIntroduction to microbial classification and identification; microbial growth; nutrition and metabolism; diversity of microbes in the environment and the human microbiome; microbial genetics.
BibliographyHogg, S. (2005) Essential Microbiology. Chichester: Wiley. Willey, J., Sherwood, L. and Woolverton, C. (2009) Prescott’s Principles of Microbiology. Boston: McGraw-Hill.
AssessmentLaboratory skills test (40%); Microbiology report (60%)

BY5509-20 Human Physiology and Regulation

DepartmentBiology
Module TitleHuman Physiology and Regulation
Module CodeBY5509-20SemesterOne
Study Hours22 contact/63 independentCredits10
AbstractThis module will make the biochemical and physiological links between common pathological states and the role of nutrition in prevention and treatment. This module will develop your knowledge of the control and regulation of absorption, transport and integration of the macronutrients and their effect on metabolic systems from molecular to whole body levels. The role of appetite and energy balance will be discussed.
Weekly CalendarIn this semester you will be introduced to pathophysiology, endocrinology and cell communication. Metabolism of the macronutrients and their regulation will be discussed. You will take part in laboratory work such as microscopy, metabolic rate and thermogenesis as well as demonstrations with more specialised equipment.
BibliographyGeissler, C. and Powers, H. (2010) Human Nutrition 12th Edition. New York: Elsevier.
AssessmentAssessment tutorial with tutor to discuss dietary analysis plan (20%). Dietary analysis (80%)

BY6502-20 Animal Behaviour

DepartmentBiology
Module TitleAnimal Behaviour
Module CodeBY6502-20SemesterOne
Study Hours17 contact/68 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionThis module explores some important aspects of animal behaviour with a focus on behavioural ecology and animal decision making. The module starts by considering the history of animal behaviour, following on to the development and control of behaviour. We also explore social behaviour and animal communication.
Weekly CalendarA history of behaviour. Development of behaviour. Control of behaviour. Social behaviour. Animal Communication.
BibliographyAlcock, J. (2013) Animal Behaviour: An Evolutionary Approach. 10th Ed. London: Sinauer Assoc. McFarland, D. (1999) Animal Behaviour. London: Longman. Dugatkin, L.A. (2013) Principles of Animal Behaviour. London: Norton & Company. Krebs, J.R. and Davies, N.B. (2012) An Introduction to Behavioural Ecology. 4th ed. Oxford: Blackwells. Stamp Dawkins, M. (2007) Observing Animal Behaviour: Design and Analysis of Quantitive Controls: Design and Analysis of Quantitative Data. Oxford: OUP. Bateson, P. and Martin, P. (2013) Measuring Behaviour: An Introductory Guide. Cambridge: CUP. Blumstein, D. and Fernández-Juricic, E. (2010) A Primer of Conservation Behaviour. London: Macmillan.
AssessmentReview on an animal behaviour topic (50%). Report on a practical application of animal behaviour (50%)

BY6505-20 Environmental Consultancy

DepartmentBiology
Module TitleEnvironmental Consultancy
Module CodeBY6505-20SemesterTBC
Study Hours17 contact/68 independentCreditsTBC
Module DescriptionThe environmental sector is a fascinating and dynamic sector in which to work,you have to tackle real-life environmental problems, find workable and sometimes innovative solutions. With increasing professional standards in the environment industry, important skills shortages in managing environmental effects have been identified in environmental impact assessment (EIA) and ecosystem services. This module aims to equip you with understanding in these areas such as environmental consultancies, Government Agencies, research groups and the not-for-profit environmental sector. It will also enable you to research the range of careers within the environmental sector.
Weekly CalendarThe nature of environmental consultancy; Project meeting: Team working, Teams and choices, Guidance on proposal development, Wiki works; Impact Assessment; Impacts - EcIA Case Studies; Alumni in the environment sector; Impact mitigation; Ecosystem services
BibliographyGlasson, J., Therivel, R., and Chadwick, A. (2005) Introduction to Environmental Impact Assessment. 3rd Ed. Abingdon: Routledge. CIEEM (2011) Chartered Institute of Ecology and Environmental Management. Membership details and guidance on Ecological Impact Assessment methodologies [Online] Available from: http://www.cieem.net/ IEMA (2011) Homepage and linked pages on EIA, EMS, professional standards and career opportunities [Online] Available at: http://www.iema.net/
AssessmentGroup Wiki on employment within the environmental sector (60%), Individual costed consultancy project proposal to client (40%)

BY6508-20 Medical Biology

DepartmentBiology
Module TitleMedical Biology
Module CodeBY6508-20SemesterOne
Study Hours17 contact/68 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionThis module aims to give students the knowledge, practical skills and experience needed for a career in the life sciences sector, particularly in disciplines allied to medicine. You will gain skills in good laboratory practice (GLP), microbiological techniques, as well aspects of medical biology such as pathology and pharmacology are explored through the lecture series and applied to ‘real world’ problems and investigations through the practical sessions and assessment.
Weekly CalendarMedical microbiology is a key area, as well as introductory pharmacology and drug treatment mechanisms. There will be practical work examining antibiotic susceptibility and microbiological identification methods.
BibliographyFord, M. (2010) Medical Microbiology: Fundamentals of Biomedical Science. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Rang, H. P., Dale, M.M., Ritter, J. M., Flower, R. J., and Henderson, G. (2012) Pharmacology. 7th ed. Edinburgh: Elsevier Churchill Livingstone.
AssessmentPractical File (50%); Drug treatment investigation (50%)

Semester 2

BY4501-40 Introduction to Biological Sciences

DepartmentBiology
Module TitleIntroduction to Biological Sciences
Module CodeBY4501-40SemesterTwo
Study Hours56 contact/166 independentCredits20
Module DescriptionThis module is designed to develop skills and knowledge needed to study Biology. It offers a broad introduction to the nature of living things, and includes the themes of cell biology, plant, animal and human structure and function, nutrition, and the environment. This wide range of key concepts, moving from cell to biosphere, are unified by the fundamental processes needed to sustain life, which are illustrated using practical examples and ‘real world’ applications. The module also aims to give students an awareness of scientific and critical thinking, as well as the transferable skills sought by potential employers.
Weekly CalendarPolysaccharides and lipids; Cell membranes; Proteins and enzymes; Plant tissues and organs; Animal/human tissues; Digestion; Energy balance and physical activity; Co-ordination: nervous and chemical; Cardiovascular function; Mineral nutrition of plants; Soil Properties; Human energy and nutrient and vitamin balance; Ecosystems, cycling and energy flow; Data analysis; Analysing class data and writing a scientific paper; Adaptations and patterns of distribution; Food production/resource exploitation.
BibliographyGibney, M.J., Lanham-New, S.A., Cassidy, A. and Vorster, H.H. (2009) Introduction to Human Nutrition. 2nd edition. Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell Publishing. Johnson, S. and Scott, J. (2009) Study Skills for the Biosciences. Oxford: OUP. Raven, P., Johnson, G.B., Losos, J.B. and Singer, S.R. (2010) Biology 10th Edition. New York: McGraw-Hill.
AssessmentSkills Self-assessment and scientific writing exercise (PDP) 20%, Poster Presentations (Group Work) 40%, Scientific paper 40%

BY4502-20 Biodiversity and Conservation

DepartmentBiology
Module TitleBiodiversity and Conservation
Module CodeBY4502-20SemesterTwo
Study Hours28 contact/80 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionThis module introduces the rich diversity of organisms in the biological world and conservation issues relating to them. It also focuses on the relevance of biodiversity in the distribution and conservation of organisms and the factors that influence where plants and animals are found in agro-ecosystems. Biodiversity surveying techniques will be introduced and used as a means of determining such factors.
Weekly CalendarDiversity of micro-organisms; Threats to biodiversity; Methods of identification: Animals, Diversity of animals, Fungi, Farm & Woodland Animals; Conservation in agro-ecosystems; Aquatic invertebrates; Grassland species; Agro-ecosystem project work.
BibliographyJeffries, M.J. (2005) Biodiversity and Conservation. London: Routledge . Margulis, L. and Schwartz, K.V. (1998) Five Kingdoms: An Illustrated Guide to the Phyla of Life on Earth. 3rd Ed. New York: Freeman & Co. Raven, P., Johnson, G.B., Losos, J.B. and Singer, S.R. (2010) Biology. 10th Ed. New York: McGraw – Hill Education. Tudge, C. (2002) The Variety of Life. Oxford: OUP.
AssessmentInterpretative test (40%), Group project and presentation (60%)

BY4503-20 Human Biology

DepartmentBiology
Module TitleHuman Biology
Module CodeBY4503-20SemesterTwo
Study Hours28 contact/80 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionThe module begins by examining normal functioning. To do this you will consider the structure (anatomy) of the human body, its functions (physiology) and how this is achieved at a chemical level (biochemistry). You will encompass human cell biology and genetics in developing your understanding of the human body, and will also have the opportunity to explore how the body reacts to disease and illness (pathology) and how diseases can be prevented or treated.
Weekly CalendarThere is a focus on the normal functioning of all major body systems at a cellular, tissue and organ level, and these are developed and illustrated through associated practical work and discussion. Practical exercises will include the use of non-invasive clinical equipment on human volunteers, and will explore themes including, reaction speed, cardiovascular monitoring, and lung function assessment.
BibliographyMader, S. (2010) Human Biology. 11th Ed. Boston: McGraw-Hill Higher Education.
AssessmentPractical File (50%). Multi Choice Test (50%)

BY5501-40 Biology: The Science of Life – Animal and Human Biology

DepartmentBiology
Module TitleBiology: The Science of Life - Animal and Human Biology
Module CodeBY5501-40SemesterTwo
Study Hours42 contact/180 independentCredits20
Moduel DescriptionThis module examines many aspects of the biology of animals and humans. You will learn about animal physiology, morphology, behaviour and adaptation to a range of habitats are also explored. Human health and occupational health issues are also considered. The role of biological conservation in appreciating biological diversity and its relevance to human life is another theme in this module.
Weekly CalendarConservation biology; biological rhythms; temperature regulation; living on land; living in the sea; living in extreme environments; biosecurity; the animal movement; microbiology; technology in biology.
BibliographyJurd, R.D. (2003) Instant Notes in Animal Biology. 2nd Ed. New York: Bios Scientific Publishers Ltd.
AssessmentInterview presentation on human/animal topic (50%), Human/animal interpretive test (50%)

BY5505-20 Ecology

DepartmentTBC
Module TitleEcology
Module CodeBY5505-20SemesterTwo
Study Hours28 contact/80 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionThis module aims to provide a theoretical and practical understanding of ecology. It explores a range of ecological principles including competition; population dynamics, biogeography and community ecology. In addition different models of ecosystem structure are also explored and functional characteristics (including material cycling, nutrient availability, energy transfer and primary and secondary production) are examined.
Weekly CalendarBiogeochemical cycles; Human interference in nutrient cycles; Ecosystem structure and energy flow; Primary and secondary production; Decomposition; Population Regulation; Ecology research centre visit; Island biogeography; Competition in plants including plant interspecific competition experiment.
BibliographyBegon, M., Townsend, C. Harper, J. (2005) Ecology: Individuals, Populations and Communities. 4th Edition. Oxford: Blackwell. Krebs, JR. and Davies, NB. (1997) Behavioural Ecology: An Evolutionary Approach. 4th Ed. Oxford: Blackwell. Spellerberg, I.F. and Sawyer, W.D. (1999). An Introduction to Applied Biogeography. Cambridge: CUP.
AssessmentPractical report (80%) Interpretative review (20%)

BY5507-20 Applied Microbiology

DepartmentBiology
Module TitleApplied Microbiology
Module CodeBY5507-20SemesterTwo
Study Hours28 contact/80 independentCredits10
AbstractThis module will cover the growth, metabolism and diversity of micro-organisms, and their relevance to the environment, to health and to industry. This semester sessions will provide you with an understanding of microbes which will allow a deeper understanding of their role and applications in the environment, in health and disease, in the food industry and in other industrial applications from production of industrial enzymes through to artificial snow.
Weekly CalendarMicrobial ecology - soil, marine and freshwater; eukaryote associations; medical microbiology and infectious disease epidemiology; antibiotic resistance; immunology, food and industrial microbiology.
BibliographyHogg, S. (2005) Essential Microbiology. Chichester: Wiley. Willey, J., Sherwood, L. and Woolverton, C. (2009) Prescott’s Principles of Microbiology. Boston: McGraw-Hill.
AssessmentLaboratory report (50%); microbiology paper (50%)

BY5509-20 Human Physiology and Regulation

DepartmentBiology
Module TitleHuman Physiology and Regulation
Module CodeBY5509-20SemesterTwo
Study Hours28 contact/80 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionThis module will make the biochemical and physiological links between common pathological states and the role of nutrition in prevention and treatment. The biological principles underpinning the nature of common conditions will be considered e.g. atherosclerosis, diabetes and obesity. Current themes in the study of nutrition will be explored, for example the within the field of nutrigenomics. Finally, the module will include counselling skills, so that the nutritional information learnt can be passed on in an appropriate manner to potential clients.
Weekly CalendarThe biological principles underpinning the nature of common conditions will be considered e.g. atherosclerosis, diabetes and obesity. Current themes in the study of nutrition will be explored, for example the within the field of nutrigenomics. The module will include counselling skills, so that the nutritional information learnt can be passed on in an appropriate manner to potential clients. You will take part in laboratory work including mineral analysis, dissection and physiological measurements.
BibliographyGeissler, C. and Powers, H. (2010) Human Nutrition 12th Edition. New York: Elsevier.
AssessmentAssessment tutorial with tutor to discuss essay plan (20%). Essay (80%)

BY6502-20 Animal Behaviour

DepartmentBiology
Module TitleAnimal Behaviour
Module CodeBY6502-20SemesterTwo
Study Hours21 contact/87 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionThis module explores some important aspects of animal behaviour with a focus on behavioural ecology and animal decision making. We consider feeding behaviour, sexual selection and mating behaviour. We also consider the role of behaviour in animal welfare and wildlife conservation.
Weekly CalendarSexual selection. Behaviour and welfare. Feeding behaviour. Conservation and behaviour. Reproduction and mating behaviour.
BibliographyAlcock, J. (2013) Animal Behavior: An Evolutionary Approach. 10th Ed. London: Sinauer Assoc. McFarland, D. (1999) Animal Behaviour. London: Longman. Dugatkin, L.A. (2013) Principles of Animal Behavior. London: Norton & Company. Krebs, J.R. and Davies, N.B. (2012) An Introduction to Behavioural Ecology. 4th ed. Oxford: Blackwells. Stamp Dawkins, M. (2007) Observing Animal Behaviour: Design and Analysis of Quantitive Controls: Design and Analysis of Quantitative Data. Oxford: OUP. Bateson, P. and Martin, P. (2013) Measuring Behaviour: An Introductory Guide. Cambridge: CUP. Blumstein, D. and Fernández-Juricic, E. (2010) A Primer of Conservation Behaviour. London: Macmillan.
AssessmentReview on an animal behaviour topic (50%). Report on a practical application of animal behaviour (50%)

BY6503-20 Plants and People

DepartmentBiology
Module TitlePlants and People
Module CodeBY6503-20SemesterTwo
Study Hours21 contact/87 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionThis module explores the all-important relationships that people have with plants. It is a very broad-based module that covers a wide range of topics, but at its core is the opportunity for you to develop your abilities to communicate the importance of plants to different groups of people. Plants, and more specifically our relationships with them - past, present and future, will determine how well we people survive on this planet. But, please be advised, this module could seriously change the way you view plants (and people...)!
Weekly CalendarTrees and wood; Plant genetic engineering; Problematic plants; Non-GM plant biotechnology; Forensic botany; Fungi (honorary plants); Plants bite back – cotton and man; Anti-microbial properties of plants; ‘Hedgerow forensics’. This semester culminates in the student-led International Plants and People conference.
BibliographyJohnson, S. and Scott, J. (2009) Study and Communication Skills for the Biosciences. Oxford: OUP. Levetin, E. and McMahon, K. (2012) Plants and Society. 6th Ed. London: McGraw-Hill International. Perlin, J. (1991) A Forest Journey. Massachusetts: Harvard University Press. The Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew (2000) Plants + People. London: RBG Kew Enterprises.
AssessmentIndividual publication on a Plants and People theme (70%); Individual presentation on a negotiated Plants and People topic (30%)

BY6505-20 Environmental Consultancy

DepartmentBiology
Module TitleEnvironmental Consultancy
Module CodeBY6505-20SemesterTwo
Study Hours21 contact/87 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionThe environmental sector requires you to find workable and sometimes innovative solutions and even sometimes undertake ground-breaking work that could affect human receptors and the wider environment. With increasing professional standards in the environment industry, important skills shortages in managing environmental effects have been identified in: protected species evaluation and wastes management. This module aims to equip you with understanding of, and experience, in these areas and thus improve employment prospects in organisations such as environmental consultancy, Government Agencies, research groups and the not-for-profit environmental sector.
Weekly CalendarProtected species; Habitat restoration; Wastes management- Options; Local authority waste campaigns; Trip to second Severn River crossing as a case study to illustrate impact assessment; Treatment of biological wastes – trip to sewage works; Guest speaker – a senior manager from consultancy industry. Project Work.
BibliographyBell, S. and McGillivray, D. (2013) Environmental Law. 8th Ed. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Waste Resources Action Programme (WRAP) (2013) - Guidance for industry [Online] Available from: http://www.wrap.org.uk/ Williams, P.T. (2005) Waste Treatment and Disposal. Chichester: John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
AssessmentIndividual consultancy project report based on group project (70%), Group presentation to clients (30%)

BY6508-20 Medical Biology

DepartmentBiology
Module TitleMedical Biology
Module CodeBY6508-20SemesterTwo
Study Hours21 contact/87 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionThis module aims to give students the knowledge, practical skills and experience needed for a career in the life sciences sector. You will gain skills in good laboratory practice (GLP), analytical techniques, as well an awareness of the ethical issues related to the study of biological material, including knowledge of the Human Tissue Act. Aspects of medical biology such as pathology, toxicology, immunology and pharmacology are explored through the lecture series and applied to ‘real world’ problems and investigations through the practical sessions and assessment.
Weekly CalendarHistopathology, and knowledge of the Human Tissue Act. Genetic healthcare technologies and biochemical diagnostic techniques
BibliographyMescher, A. (2013) Junqueira's Basic Histology: Text and Atlas. 13th Ed. London: McGraw-Hill Medical. Rang, H. P., Dale, M.M., Ritter, J. M., Flower, R. J., and Henderson, G. (2012) Pharmacology. 7th Ed. Edinburgh: Elsevier Churchill Livingstone.
AssessmentPractical File 1 (50%). Practical File 2 (50%)

Business and Management

Semester 1

BM4002-20 Economics and Globalisation

DepartmentBusiness
Module TitleEconomics and Globalisation
Module CodeBM4002-20SemesterOne
Study Hours22 contact/63 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionThis module is designed to provide an introduction to globalisation and to economics, with an emphasis on its applicability to the analysis of contemporary business problems. The module will introduce you to the fundamental principles of economics that are relevant to a modern day business, and how economists build and use models to analyse the economic development around us. The primary objective of the course is to guide you towards a better understanding of the economic environment and develop an appreciation of the opportunities available to, and limitations imposed upon, businesses in this environment. This semester focuses on the business environment and microeconomics.
Weekly CalendarIntroduction to economics in particular microeconomics, covering international trade, demand supply and market equilibrium, opportunity cost, elasticity and production, managerial objectives, market structure, market failures and regulations.
BibliographyGriffiths, A. and Wall, S. (2008) Economics for Business and Management. Bristol: Financial Times/Prentice Hall.
AssessmentMicroeconomics - Individual Report 100%

BM5002-20 Marketing Business

DepartmentBusiness
Module TitleMarketing Business
Module CodeBM5002-20SemesterOne
Study Hours22 contact/63 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionThis module introduces students to the process of marketing. You will develop your understanding of the key concepts of the marketing business and investigate how they can be applied effectively in a range of different business contexts. The marketing framework is therefore explored from the perspective of the manufacturer and the consumer and applied to a variety of organisations. The module also evaluates whether marketing always has a positive impact on society and debates how it is possible for organisations to be socially responsible when marketing their goods and services.
Weekly CalendarContemporary marketing, Identification of customer needs, consumer buying behaviour, introduction to marketing strategy, market segmentation, shopping and the retail environment, integrated marketing communications.
BibliographyKotler, P., Armstrong, G., Harris, L.C. and Piercy, N. (2013) Principles of Marketing. London: Pearson.
AssessmentPresentation (20%) and reflective assessment (30%)

BM5003-20 Human Resource Management

DepartmentBusiness
Module TitleHuman Resource Management
Module CodeBM5003-20SemesterOne
Study Hours22 contact/63 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionThe human resources or the people within an organisation are one of the key factors in determining the success or failure of a business. As a result, the study of how human resources can be managed is a vital component of furthering your understanding of the business world. For aspiring managers, this module will give you a broad introduction into the challenges and activities that are involved in the management of people. In this semester the focus of the module is on resource & talent planning and learning, training & development.
Weekly CalendarIntroduction to recruitment and selection, approaches to people resourcing and talent planning, Retention and managing redundancy, learning, training and development and vocational education, skills and training in the UK, why and how do organisations train and develop employees.
BibliographyTorrington, D. and Hall, L. (2008) Human Resource Management, 6th Ed. London: Pearson.
AssessmentTBC

BM5004-20 Financial Accounting

DepartmentBusiness
Module TitleFinancial Accounting
Module Code22 contact/63 independentSemesterOne
Study Hours22 contact/63 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionBusiness decision making is based on qualitative and quantitative data. Whilst both of these are important, in this module we focus on the financial information provided to management by a robust accounting system. In order to understand how an organization makes short, medium and long term decisions an understanding of financial accounting systems is necessary. This module is designed to provide an introduction to accounting and is accordingly, very broad in its design. It gives students an opportunity to understand the accounting principles and standards which have been widely used by UK, European and multinational companies. To take this module students must have good numerical skills and a basic understanding of accounting and complete at least 3-hour self study per week on the course material, seminar questions and textbook.
Weekly CalendarIntroduction to financial accounting, financial statements and accounting equations, year end adjustments, financial and management accounting, expenditure and depreciation, trade receivables, loss and source of finance.
BibliographyDyson, J. (2007) Accounting for Non-accounting Students. 7th Ed. London: Financial Times /Prentice Hall
AssessmentWritten assignment (100%)

BM5005-20 Information and Operations Management

DepartmentBusiness
Module TitleInformation and Operations Management
Module CodeBM5005-20SemesterOne
Study Hours22 contact/63 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionThis module explores ways in which business environments are changing faster than ever before. Global business operations, decentralisation of large local business groups, and offshoring, are influencing operations management and the information systems used to manage the supply of goods and services. Among them use of the internet as the need for electronically connecting various business activities becomes extensive; Enterprise Resource Planning, integrated software packages made up of financial, manufacturing, human resource and other modules involving the entire firm; Supply Chain Management Systems.
Weekly CalendarThe module will reflect on major shifts that are occurring in supply-chain and operations management, as well as approaches to cost reduction, quality improvement and on-time delivery.
BibliographyJones, P. and Robinson, P. (2012) Operations Management. 8th Ed. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
AssessmentTBC

BM5020-20 International Business

DepartmentBusiness
Module TitleInternational Business
Module CodeBM5020-20SemesterOne
Study Hours22 contact/63 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionGlobalisation is one of the key challenges in today's business environment and a growing number of companies are going global. On the international stage, businesses encounter a wide variety of opportunities and challenges that arise from their position as (initial) outsiders to a local context different from their home country. Globalisation accelerates business interfaces across countries, while only marginally reducing differences in national contexts. As a result, it is becoming more and more important that students possess intercultural awareness competences and practice their business knowledge across borders in order to enhance career aspirations. In this semester the module focuses on providing an overview of international business as a subject and includes the business environment, ethics and structure.
Weekly CalendarIntroduction to international business and the international business environment, business communication, understanding cultures values and differences, business ethics and social responsibility, organisational structure and control.
BibliographyGriffin, R. W. and Pustay, M.W. (2010) International Business. 6th Ed. London: Pearson.
AssessmentInter-cultural communication project (80%) plus reflection (20%)

BM6020-20 Cross Cultural Management in International Business

DepartmentBusiness
Module TitleCross Cultural Management in International Business
Module CodeBM6020-20SemesterTBC
Study Hours17 contact/68 independentCreditsTBC
Module DescriptionManagement practices and processes frequently differ across national and regional boundaries. What may be acceptable managerial practice in one culture may be counterproductive or even unacceptable in another. As managers increasingly find themselves working across cultures, the need to understand these differences has become increasingly important. The purpose of this module is to expose students to why these differences exist and how global managers can develop strategies and tactics to deal with them. This module also develops students' ability to apply their knowledge and understanding to complex management and business problems in order to improve business and management practice in a global context.
Weekly CalendarIntroduction to global realities and management challenges; developing global management skills; the cultural, organisational and situational environment.
BibliographySteers, R.M., Nardon, L. and Sanchez-Runde, C. (2013) Management Across Cultures: Developing Global Competences. 2nd Ed. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press
AssessmentGroup presentation (100%)

Semester 2

BM4002-20 Economics and Globalisation

DepartmentBusiness
Module TitleEconomics and Globalisation
Module CodeBM4002-20SemesterTwo
Study Hours22 contact/63 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionThis module is designed to provide an introduction to globalisation and to economics, with an emphasis on its applicability to the analysis of contemporary business problems. The module will introduce you to the fundamental principles of economics that are relevant to a modern day business, and how economists build and use models to analyse the economic development around us. The primary objective of the course is to guide you towards a better understanding of the economic environment and develop an appreciation of the opportunities available to, and limitations imposed upon, businesses in this environment. This semester focuses on macroeconomics and an introduction to international economics and globalisation.
Weekly CalendarIntroduction to macroeconomics and Introduction to globalisation covering macroeconomic objectives and the business cycle, economic growth, inflation and unemployment, fiscal and monetary policy, globalisation, international institutions and trading blocs, balance of payments, multinationals and the developing countries.
BibliographyGriffiths, A. and Wall, S. (2008) Economics for Business and Management. Bristol: Financial Times/Prentice Hall.
AssessmentMacroeconomics and Globalisation - Group presentation (40%) and exam (60%)

BM5003-20 Human Resource Management

DepartmentBusiness
Module TitleHuman Resource Management
Module CodeBM5003-20SemesterTwo
Study Hours22 contact/63 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionThe human resources or the people within an organisation are one of the key factors in determining the success or failure of a business. As a result, the study of how human resources can be managed is a vital component of furthering your understanding of the business world. For aspiring managers, this module will give you a broad introduction into the challenges and activities that are involved in the management of people.
Weekly CalendarTBC
BibliographyTorrington, D. and Hall, L. (2008) Human Resource Management, 6th Ed. London: Pearson.
AssessmentBusiness report (80%) plus reflection (20%)

BM5020-20 International Business

DepartmentBusiness
Module TitleInternational Business
Module CodeBM5020-20SemesterTwo
Study Hours22 contact/63 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionGlobalisation is one of the key challenges in today's business environment and a growing number of companies are going global. On the international stage, businesses encounter a wide variety of opportunities and challenges that arise from their position as (initial) outsiders to a local context different from their home country. Globalisation accelerates business interfaces across countries, while only marginally reducing differences in national contexts. As a result, it is becoming more and more important that students possess intercultural awareness competences and practice their business knowledge across borders in order to enhance career aspirations. In this semester the module focuses on models and methods of internationalisation looking at strategies, innovation and entrepreneurship and ultimately future trends in international business.
Weekly CalendarDeveloping an business international strategy, models and methods of internationalisation, international marketing management, international operations management, human resource management, innovation and entrepreneurship, future trends in international business.
BibliographyGriffin, R. W. and Pustay, M.W. (2010) International Business. 6th Ed. London:Pearson
AssessmentGroup project on developing international strategies (100%)

BM6007-20 Business Strategy

DepartmentBusiness
Module TitleBusiness Strategy
Module CodeBM6007-20SemesterTwo
Study Hours17 contact/68 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionThis module explores the ways in which businesses make realistic and viable plans for the future. In particular, it contrasts more orthodox and conventional thinking about strategy with critical and heterodox approaches. You will therefore be expected to develop a sound understanding of the main models of strategy making formulated by both practitioners and researchers, to evaluate them critically and to develop alternative and less conventional ways of thinking about strategy.
Weekly CalendarBroad approaches to business strategy, strategies for multi-business organisations, managing a portfolio of businesses, strategic alliances and cooperation, international strategy, not-for-profit organisations, managing change, exploring views of practitioners.
BibliographyJohnson G., Scholes, K., and Whittington, R. (2008) Exploring Corporate Strategy. London:Financial Times/ Prentice Hall
AssessmentIndividual Report 100%

Computer Science

Semester 1

CC4001-40 Computing 1

DepartmentComputer Science
Module TitleComputing 1
Module CodeCC4001-40SemesterOne
Study Hours44 contact/60 independentCredits20
Module DescriptionThe module aims to provide a solid grounding in creative computing, looking at hardware, software and communications, and situating these in a social, legal and ethical context. It also provides an introduction to Java programming. Topics are as follows: Social and ethical issues (moral philosophy, metaethics, metaphysical, psychological and linguistic issues, deontological and consequentialist theories of normative ethics); Applied ethics (personal identity, digital citizenship, copyright and intellectual property, cyber security, net behaviour, ethical hacking); History of computing (theoretical foundations: computer hardware: operating system fundamentals; essentials of networking).
The module then goes on to provide all students with a solid basis in Java programming, beginning with a Short Course (4-8 weeks) introducing the programming languages HTML, JavaScript, MySQL, and PHP; simple text editors such as EditPlus and an interactive development environment such as NetBeans; programming with Python and working with APIs; followed by a course in Java Programming.
Weekly CalendarTBC
Bibliography"Berners-­‐Lee, T. (2010). ‘Long Live the Web: A Call for Continued Open Standards and Neutrality’, Scientific American http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=long-­‐live-­‐the-­‐web
Carsten-­‐Stahl, B. (2006). Issues and Trends in Technology and Human Interaction, IGI.  Ceruzzi, P. (2012). Computing: A Concise History, MIT Press.  Forouzan, B.A. (2011). Data Communications and Networking, McGraw Hill.  Lanier, J. (2011). You Are Not a Gadget, Penguin.  Patterson, D and Hennessy, J. (2012). Computer Organization and Design: The Hardware/Software Interface, Revised 4th Edition Ed., Waltham, MA : Morgan Kaufmann.  Schildt, H. (2011). Java: A Beginner’s Guide, McGraw-­‐Hill.  Stallings, W. (2008). Operating Systems Internals and Design Principles, Prentice Hall.  Stallings, W. (2012). Computer Organisation and Architecture, Prentice Hall.
Assessment3 x open book tests (10% each); 1 x closed book test (35%); 1 x research project (35%)

CC4003-20 Digital Practice

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DepartmentComputer Science
Module TitleDigital Practice
Module CodeCC4003-20SemesterOne
Study Hours22 contact/30 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionThis module introduces students to the production of a variety of digital media. This ‘media’ includes text, still images, video, audio, sound and animation. The module will provide an introduction to types of media, situating this within cultural and societal contexts with a historical perspective. Students will also be exposed to a series of digital practice, which will mean making an artefact. However, this module aims to ensure that context and relevant historical perspectives inform production. This means students will be expected to ensure their ideas are appropriately informed by theory, among other aspects.
This module will also introduce the students to creativity and how digital media are and can be used in practical and creative pursuits.
This module will provide grounding in digital media processes and techniques, with the aim of ensuring students are well placed to work on digital media projects and understand core basics of the medium. These include both theory, development and application. It is expected the student will work on practical projects producing artefacts and portfolios working both individually (summative assignments) and in small groups (formative assignments).
Weekly CalendarTBC
BibliographyRoberts-Breslin, J. (2011). Making Media: Foundations of Sound and Image Production, London: Taylor & Francis.  Chapman, N. P. & Chapman, J. (2009). Digital Multimedia (Vol. 4), Chicago: Wiley.  Couldry, N. (2012). Media, Society, World: Social Theory and Digital Media Practice, London: Polity.  Creeber, G., & Martin, R. (Eds.). (2009). Digital Culture: Understanding New Media, Columbus OH: McGraw-Hill International.
AssessmentProject (35%); Portfolio (35%); Essay (30%

CC5001-40 Computing 2

Available from 2016/17 only

DepartmentComputer Science
Module TitleComputing 2
Module CodeCC5001-40SemesterOne
Study Hours33 contact/142 independentCredits20
Module DescriptionThis module focuses on helping you gain a good knowledge of advanced programming techniques and learn how to write good quality software. This will be taught following a problem solving, case-­‐study based approach to learning programming skills. There will be an emphasis on the use of integrated programming environments to develop programs with a graphic user interface to be used in the context of distributed systems.  You will make use of object-­‐oriented (OO) programming languages and build on basic programming skills and a fundamental understanding of OO languages, to cover: the issues of software re-­‐use, software quality, an architecture-­‐based approach to software construction within the context of a managed process.
This module introduces you to the C family of programming language, in particular C++, including issues arising from the various extensions of C that have been developed. The module assumes some familiarity with programming in Java, and it will emphasise the differences between C-­‐style languages and Java. It also introduces programming for apps, databases and web development programming, especially with reference to open data and C languages.
Weekly CalendarTBC
BibliographyKing, D. and Turban, E. (2012). Electronic Commerce, Pearson.  Schneider, G. P. (2008). Electronic Commerce: Concepts, Methodologies, Tools and Applications, Information Science Reference.  Blanchette, J., & Summerfield, M. (2008). C++ GUI Programming With Qt 4 (Prentice Hall Open Source Software Development Series).  Bennett, S., McRobb, S., & Farmer, R. (2005). Object-­‐oriented Systems Analysis and Design using UML, McGraw Hill Higher Education.  Thorn, A. (2007). Introduction to Game Programming with C++, BPB Publications.  Gaddis, T. (2013). Starting Out with Games and Graphics in C++ (International Version), Pearson.
Dawson, M. (2011). Beginning C++ Through Game Programming, Delmar Cengage Learning: 3rd Revised edition.  Kochan, S. (2010). Programming in Objective-­‐C, Addison Wesley.
AssessmentSystem development experiment (25%); Blog article (25%); Project (50%)

CC5005-20 Digital Social Innovation and Enterprise

Available from 2016/17 only

DepartmentComputer Science
Module TitleDigital Social Innovation and Enterprise
Module CodeCC5005-20SemesterOne
Study Hours39 contact/52 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionThis module is for those who want to make a difference, those who want to develop and use their skills and experience to work with purpose at a global, national and/or local level. There are many ways in which people can create new and effective answers to the biggest challenges of our times, for example: how to cut our carbon footprint; how to keep people healthy; and how to increase access to education. The 21st century brings new ways of working often facilitated by digital technology: connected communities from local to global; collaborative multi-disciplinary, cross-sector working (e.g. across across public, private and non-profit sectors); creativity and technology; nimble organisations; working at a high level with energy, a generosity of spirit, passion and purpose – to get results.
This module gives offers an introduction to the field of social innovation, enterprise, and entrepreneurship, which has become increasingly important in the last decade as we face ever-more challenging problems requiring ever-more innovative solutions. It is about combining creative thinking and digital innovation with the application of business-based models and practices to create sustainable organisations and activities.
Weekly CalendarTBC
BibliographyBornstein, David and Davis, Susan, Social Entrepreneurship: What Everyone Needs to Know (OUP 2010).  Murray, Robin et. al. The Open Book of Social Innovation (NESTA, 2010) – available as free download
http://www.nesta.org.uk/publications/open-book-social-innovation.  Heffernan, Margaret, A Bigger Prize: Why Competition Isn't Everything and How We Do Better (Simon & Schuster, 2014).
Osterwalder and Pigneur, Business Model Generation (Wiley, 2010).  Pink, Daniel, Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us (Canongate, 2011).  Ries, Eric, The Lean Startup: How Constant Innovation Creates Radically Successful Businesses (Penguin, 2011) and see the title website: http://theleanstartup.com/  Robinson, Ken, Finding Your Element: How to Discover Your Talents and Passions and Transform Your Life (Allen Lane, 2013).
AssessmentWeb page (20%); Portfolio (80%)

Semester 2

CC4002-40 Interface Design

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DepartmentComputer Science
Module TitleInterface Design
Module CodeCC4002-40SemesterTwo
Study Hours44 contact/60 independentCredits20
Module DescriptionThe module will introduce you to design principles that will enable to understand the fundamentals of interface design.
Interface design crosses graphic design and user experience, and the module will give you an overview of the important factors to consider when creating an interface.
By analysing and evaluating a variety of existing interfaces (physical and screen-based) you will develop an understanding of the key opportunities for engagement with users (audience). You will explore different methods of narrative sequence, and become aware of the importance of symbols and icons. Through observation and reflection you will understand the relationship between the user and the interface, user experience, the impact the environment (context) has upon the development of an effective interface, and be able to understand how the context for interfaces affects the experience.
Weekly CalendarTBC
BibliographyAllanwoord, Gavin and Beare, Peter, User Experience Design (Bloomsbury 2014). Ambrose, Gavin, The Fundamentals of Creative Design (AVA Academia, 2011). Carter, Rob, Digital Colour and Type (Rotovision, 2002)
Gordon, Bob and Maggie, eds. Complete Guide to Digital Graphic Design (Thames & Hudson 2002). Kane, John, A Type Primer (Laurence King, 2002). Norman, Donald A., The Design of Future Things (2007).
Norman, Donald A., The Design of Everyday Things (2013). Roberts, Lucienne (intro), Grids Creative Solutions for Graphic Designers (Rotovision, 2007). Wood, Dave, Interface Design (Bloomsbury, 2014)
AssessmentDesign fundamentals portfolio (50%); Interface design portfolio (50%)

CC5002-40 Digital Animation

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DepartmentComputer Science
Module TitleDigital Animation
Module CodeCC5002-40SemesterTwo
Study Hours42 contact/180 independentCredits20
Module DescriptionAnimation is all around us: from stunning short and feature-length animated films to simulating the interaction of a physical book through animating the turning of ‘pages’ on an iPad and and photorealistic digital special effects such as The Matrix, Visual Effects (VFX) and computer games.  This module will look at the ways in which you can make and use animation in imaginative, experimental and innovative ways.
You will develop your creative and technical skills by experimenting with a variety of animation and image-making techniques during practical workshops.
The workshops will include: generating images from interesting sources and materials, technical demonstrations of software, demonstrations of image-making techniques, character design, scene design, storyboards and experimental sound.  The module will also include an overview of animation in a historical, cultural and industry based contexts.
Weekly CalendarTBC
Bibliography

Pilling, Jayne, Ed., A Reader in Animation Studies (John Libbey Cinema & Animation, 1999).  Shaw, Susannah, Stop Motion: Craft Skills for Model Animation (Focal Press, 2012).  Wyatt, Andy, The Complete Digital Animation Course: The Principles, Practice and Techniques of Successful Digital Animation (2010).  Wells, Paul, Understanding Animation (Routledge, Oxon, 1998)

AssessmentPortfolio (50%); Film (50%)

CC5003-40 Games Design

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DepartmentComputer Science
Module TitleGames Design
Module CodeCC5003-40SemesterTwo
Study Hours42 contact/180 independentCredits20
Module DescriptionA Game Designer develops a game’s content and how it plays (the rules etc.)– and communicates this to others in the team who will create the assets and code that enables the game to be played. The content will include the game’s setting, structure, rules, narrative, characters, and interface design.  This module provides an introduction to games design and to the games industry; it also outlines the key elements of games development.
Students will learn how to respond to a variety of creative briefs imaginatively and manage small-scale projects methodically. The production pipeline is mapped out with prototypes and proof-of-concept gameplay milestones being built and tested, using tools such as TWINE, Game Maker, Unity, and Unreal Engine.  A series of lectures and independent research tasks will provide students with contextual knowledge of the games industry (past and present; UK and international), different genres, technology and tools, and roles, good practice, and current challenges of games design and development. The wider influence of games within contemporary culture and business will be considered, specifically the application of ludic design principles in other creative sectors (e.g. ‘gamification’).
Weekly CalendarTBC
BibliographyAdams, E., Fundamentals of Game Design, (Berkeley, CA, New Riders, 2009).  Anthropy , Anna and Clark,, Naomi, A Game Design Vocabulary: Exploring the Foundational Principles for Good Game Design (Addison Wesley, 2014).  Chandler, Heather, The Game Production Handbook, 3rd edn., (Jones and Bartlett, 2013)
AssessmentPortfolio (60%); Demo (40%)

CC5004-40 Web and Mobile Application Development

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DepartmentComputer Science
Module TitleWeb and Mobile Application Development
Module CodeCC5004-40SemesterTwo
Study Hours42 contact/180 independentCredits20
Module DescriptionThis module provides a firm technical foundation of how a web application uses various Internet protocols so that a user's browser can be a client to the application's web server, which in turn acts as client to the database server which holds the assets being accessed.
Structured data, held in relational databases, accessed via SQL, supports a substantial proportion of modern web-applications. What is to be learnt includes how to design the structure of data within a relational database, how to interact with data within the database, and how to protect the data within the database.
Sitting atop, the TCP/IP/Ethernet stack are the application layer protocols that make the Web what it is. Particularly significant in this category are DNS, HTTP and HTTPS. Key features of these protocols alongside key protocols relating to email, how servers that deliver some of these protocols are configured, Markup languages that control structure and appearance of web content (XML, HTML and CSS) will be studied.
Modern web applications typically make heavy use of scripting both at the server and also in the client browser. A server-side scripting language that has achieved prominence over recent years has been PHP. This pragmatic language is used to great effect by some web developers and with catastrophic naivety by others. On the client side, JavaScript has similar prominence and similar problems.
Weekly CalendarTBC
BibliographyConnolly T., Begg C., Strachan A, (2005). Database Systems: A Practical Approach to Design, Implementation and Management, 3rd ed., Addison-Wesley.
AssessmentDatabase (30%); Protocols (30%); Scripting (40%)

Creative Writing

Semester 1

CS4001-40 Writer's Workshop 1

DepartmentCreative Writing
Module TitleWriter's Workshop 1
Module CodeCS4001-40SemesterOne
Study Hours44 contact/130 independentCredits20
Module DescriptionThis module will offer students practice and help with different genres of writing, experimentation and workshopping of student writing, as well as requiring attendance at lectures and plenary events. The
students also work on a group project of their choice and present the results in lectures or seminars.
Weekly CalendarWeek One: Introduction. Week Two: Workshopping. Week Three: Discuss creative project. Week Four: The Short Story 1. Week Five: The Dreaded Cliché Week Six: Short Story 2. Week Seven: Writing for Young People 1. Week Eight: Finding Your Creativity. Week Nine: Writing for Young People 2 Week Ten: Revising Fiction. Week Eleven: Art of Reading Aloud
BibliographyNew Hart's Rules
AssessmentPortfolio of student writing, report on events attended

CS4002-20 Explorations in Prose Fiction

DepartmentCreative Writing
Module TitleExplorations in Prose Fiction
Module CodeCS4002-20SemesterOne
Study Hours22 contact/63 independentCredits20
Module DescriptionThis module aims to make students confident and versatile writers and readers prose fiction. It will concentrate on both the technical/grammatical elements of prose, ensuring that students have a sound understanding of its constituent parts, alongside an awareness of the wide ranging genres and styles that writers have used.
Weekly CalendarWeek One: Introduction to Prose Fiction. Week Two: William Styron: Case Study. Week Three: Tristram Shandy. Week Four: Holes. Week Five: The Talented Mr Ripley. Week Six: Black Water. Week Seven: The Martian Chronicles. Week Eight: Speak, Memory. Week Nine: Red Dragon. Week Ten: Elephant. Week Eleven: The Shipping News.
BibliographyA selection of the following texts will be used: Proulx, A. (2009) The Shipping News; Vladimir Nabokov. New York: Scribner. Fire, P., Burgess, A. (2000) A Clockwork Orange. London: Penguin. Sterne, L. Shandy, T. (2011) The Book of Revelation. London: Canongate Books. Beckett, S., Cummings E.E (2002) The Enormous Room. New York: Dover Publications. Calvino, I. (1998) If on a Winters Night a Traveller. New York: Harcourt Brace International. Camus, A. (2008) The Plague. London: Vintage International. Almond, D. (2013) Skellig. London: Hodder Children's Books. Gaiman, N. (2009) The Graveyard Book. London: Bloomsbury Publishing PLC. Sachar, L. (2000) Holes. London: Bloomsbury Publishing PLC. Charles, R. (2007) Spin. Berlin: Tor Books. Ballard, JG. (2014) Concrete Island. London: Fourth Estate. Hoban, R. (2012) Ridley Walker. London: Bloomsbury Paperbacks. Le Guin, U. (1993) The Earthsea Quartet. Penguin: London. Simmons, D. (2005) Hyperion. New York: Gollancz. Harries, T. (2009) Red Dragon. London: Arrow. Stoker, B. (1993) Dracula. London: Wordsworth Editions. Ligotti, T. (2008) Teatro Grottesco. London: Virgin Books. Auster, P. (2011) The New York Trilogy. London: Faber & Faber. Elroy, J. (1994) LA Confidential. London: Arrow. Deighton, L. (2009) The Ipcress File. London: Harper. Highsmith, P. (2008) The Talented Mr Ripley. London: W. W. Norton & Company. Eyre, J., Bronte C. and Euginedes, J. (2009) The Virgin Suicides. New York: Picador. Updike, J. (1996) Couples. New York: Random House Trade Paperbacks. Rhys, J. (1999) Good Morning, Midnight. W. W. London: Norton & Company. Kafka, F. (2000) Metamorphosis and Other Stories. New York: Dover Publications Inc. O’Connor, F. (1982) Collected Stories. New York: Vintage. Carver, R. (2009) Collected Stories. New York: Library of America. Bradbury, R .(2008) The Martian Chronicles. London: Harper Voyager. Crace, J.(2010) Being Dead. New York: Picador. Perec, G. (1996) Life, A User’s Manual. London: Vintage. Johnson, B.S. (1999) The Unfortunates. New York: Picador. O’Brien, F. (2000) At Swim-Two-Birds. London: Penguin Classics. Students will also study short sample texts from non-fictional genres – such as advertising copy, legal documents, academic essays, instruction manuals, blogs and other new media.
Assessment2,500 word sample(s) of prose fiction (50%) 2,500 word study of a key text (or texts) in relation to the student’s own work (50%)

CS4003-20 Reading to Write Poetry

DepartmentCreative Writing
Module TitleCS4003-20
Module CodeCS4003-20SemesterOne
Study Hours22 contact/63 independentCredits20
Module DescriptionThis module is designed to teach students the fundamental importance of reading to the writing of poetry. They will be taught that the progression of the writing will not be possible without a capacity to read poetry intelligently.
Weekly CalendarIntroduction; the line and stanza; visualization; the music of words; analysing poems and individual poem analysis paper; lyric and narrative; poetry and influence; poetry and the personal; other poetries; poetry and surprise; revision; performance and publication.
BibliographyAstley, N. (2002) Staying Alive: Real Poems for Unreal Times. New York: Bloodaxe Books Ltd. Padel, R. (2004) Fifty Two Ways of Looking at a Poem. London: Vintage. Herbert, W. and Hollis, M. (2000) Strong Words. New York: Bloodaxe Books Ltd. Pollen, W. 1995. Essays on Poetry. London:Faber & Faber. Ted Hughes, Faber and Faber. Websites [Online] www.uk.poetryinternationalweb.org www.poetrymagazines.org.uk www.poetrysociety.org.uk www.poetryarchive.org
AssessmentCreative Folder of Poems (8-10 poems, or number agreed at tutor’s discretion – 1500 words or equivalent) – 50% Analysis of Individual Poem (1000 words or equivalent) – 5% Reading Paper (2500 words plus appendices to include review of Poetry series reading and any other support material) – 45%

CS4004-20 Introduction to Scriptwriting

DepartmentCreative Writing
Module TitleIntroduction to Scriptwriting
Module CodeCS4004-20SemesterOne
Study Hours22 contact/63 independentCredits10
AbstractThe module will introduce students to the craft of scriptwriting. All kinds of scripts will be covered and compared, so that the basic generic differences between (say) theatre and radio scriptwriting are established. The module will also deal with the varying routes and processes by which scripts get into performance.
Weekly CalendarSoap: brainstorming and premise; basic dramatic structure; layout and formatting; scene analysis and creation; examining a stage play; examining a screenplay;examining a radio play; creating dialogue; the business of scriptwriting; reading, viewing and listening to script; student readings and performances of their work.
BibliographyCarter, D. (1999) Teach Yourself How to Write a Play. New York: NTC Publishing Group. Field, S. (2003) The Definitive Guide to Screenwriting. London: Ebury Press. McKee, R. (1999) Story: Substance, Structure, Style and the Principles of Screenwriting, New York: ReganBooks. MacLoughlin, S. (2008) Writing for Radio. London: Soundplay. Smethurst, W. (2009) Writing for Television,. London: How To Books.
Assessment1. The Creative Folder (3000 words maximum) will contain selected pieces of creative work written for the module. – 50% 2. The Context Folder (2000 words maximum) – 40% 3. Class Participation – 10%

CS5002-20 Short Stories

DepartmentCreative Writing
Module TitleShort Stories
Module CodeCS5002-20SemesterOne
Study Hours22 contact/63 independentCredits20
Module DescriptionThis module has two aims: 1) To introduce the student to the short story form and to enable them to understand how writers across all the genres of short story-writing achieve their goals, and 2) To use the short story form as the basis upon which the student can explore further and in more detail the elements of narrative fiction. The student will be expected to complete a number of short stories for their final submission.
Weekly Calendar1 Introduction; 1-page stories in preparation for sharing the following week/ 2 a: Miniature Narratives: Chekhov, Kafka, Williams, Schulz, Rhys b: workshopping 1-page stories/ 3 a: Miniature Narratives: Moravia, Borowski, Calvino, Gordimer, Padgett, Carey b: workshopping 1-page stories/ 4 a: Miniature Narratives/Dramatic Monologues: Dybek, Lightman, Oates, Martinb: workshopping 1-page stories/ 5 a: Early Stories: Kafka, Hemingway, Cheever, Updike b: workshopping 2-page stories/ 6 a: Narratives in Other Modes: Hawthorne, Thoreau, Woolf, Borges, Updike, b: workshopping 2-page stories/ 7 a: Narratives in Other Modes/Poems That Tell Stories: Kingston, Frost, Gilmore b: workshopping 2-page stories/ 8 a: Classics and Contemporaries: Lawrence, Carver, Atwood b: workshopping 2-page stories/ 9 a: Classics and Contemporaries: Heyen, Boyle, Frazier, Banks, Oatesb: workshopping 2-page stories/ 10 TUTORIAL FEEDBACK ON COURSEWORK DRAFTS/ 11 Workshopping of remaining or extra submissions
BibliographyOates, C. (1998) Telling Stories: An Anthology for Writers. New York: Norton.
Assessment2,500 word author study -- 50% 2,500 word folder of short stories -- 50%

CS5003-20 Form and Listening in Poetry

DepartmentCreative Writing
Module TitleForm and Listening in Poetry
Module CodeCS5003-20SemesterOne
Study Hours22 contact/63 independentCredits20
Module DescriptionYou will be encouraged to explore two important poetry issues: firstly, what forms are available to a poet wishing to expand his/her poetics; and secondly, who is it that is being addressed when a poem is written? You will tackle all the traditional forms available: sonnet, villanelle, sestina, pantoum, blank verse, free verse, and so forth. The object of this is to show you how form will assist in the control and focusing of poems. At the same time, having studied an individual form, you will be actively encouraged to subvert the form as much as possible: to make a form your own.
Weekly CalendarOne: Why form? What are its' advantages? What are its' challenges?/ Two: What is meant by the subversion of form? What is meant by the contemporising of form? How do you make a form your own, how do you befriend form? How can form sharpen writing?/ Three: How to read/write a sonnet/ Four: How to read/write a villanelle/ Five: How to read/write quatrains and tercets./ Six: How to read/write blank verse./ Seven: What is free verse? What is blank verse? Why are the most prevalent forms currently prevailing in modern poetry?/ Eight: Who is Listening? How to imagine a listener?/ Nine: Is there such a thing as an ideal reader?/ Ten: Who was Wordsworth, Hughes, and Eliot writing to?/ Eleven: Having started writing in form, what happens if from now on I abandon it?
BibliographyPadel, R. (2002 ) 52 Ways of Looking at a Poem: Or How Reading Modern Poetry Can Change Your Life. London: Chatto and Windus.
AssessmentCreative Folder of Poems (8-10 poems, or number agreed at tutor’s discretion – 1500 words or equivalent) -- 50% Mini paper (1000 words or equivalent) -- 10% Reading Paper (2500 words plus appendices to include review of Poetry series reading and any other support material) -- 40%

CS5004-20 Writing for Theatre

DepartmentCreative Writing
Module TitleWriting for Theatre
Module CodeCS5004-20SemesterOne
Study Hours22 contact/63 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionThis module combines a historical study of the developing relations between theatre space and dramatic language with the writing of students' own plays designed for a particular theatre. The first project for this module is to identify two modern plays that inspire you and write a 3,000 word essay on the components that go to make those plays successful - comparing and contrasting their various elements. In the second part of the module each of you will write a ‘short form’ play. This is basically a 20 minute script. It is not the first 20 minutes of a play, but a play where the entire story takes 20 minutes to show on stage.
Weekly CalendarOverview: the changing relations of theatre space to world-view; how language operates in theatre; physical aspects of performance independent of language; sessions devoted to writing student plays designed for a particular kind of theatre; workshop on essay; individual tutorial preparing for submission;student performances; feedback session
BibliographyKing, D. (2011) Foxfinder. Nick Hern Books
AssessmentAn analysis of two contrasting plays and their staging – 50% A script for a complete short play lasting no longer than 15 minutes, including a description of the intended theatre -- 50%

CS5005-20 Lifewriting

DepartmentCreative Writing
Module TitleLifewriting
Module CodeCS5005-20SemesterOne
Study Hours22 contact/63 independentCredits20
Module DescriptionIn this module you learn to write nonfiction for a general reader. This is not academic writing, and it is not like an essay. Instead, you use the same methods you already know for creative writing. You tell a story, about other people, with characters, and a beginning, a middle and an end. You pick a topic you want to write about. You can write about the night shift in A and E, a vet who helps a lot of homeless people with their dogs, your grandfather's military service, the fortunes of a local band, an anti-fracking camp, teaching sky diving, disused mines near Bath, the threatened extinction of frogs, trading futures in the oil market, badgers – anything.
Weekly CalendarResearch methods; telling a story in nonfiction; writing a scene in nonfiction using dialogue, action and description. How do I keep someone else's voice whilst writing in my own? Specific incident or whole decade? Choosing an interviewee or an historical subject to write about; developing an ear for speech: voice, vocabulary, gesture. How to edit the 'what' of your story. This is finding what your story is really about. How to use detail to carry a big message. Looking at life from someone else's perspective. Context. (Life doesn't happen in a vacuum.)
BibliographyA reading list might include: Junger, S (2006) The Perfect Storm. London: Harper Perennial. Fuller, A. (2003) Don't Let's Go to the Dogs Tonight: An African Childhood. London: Picador. MacMasters, A. (2006) Stuart: A Life Lived Backwards. London: Fourth Estate. Rodriguez, D. (2014) The Kabul Beauty School. London: Sphere. Simon, D. (2009) Homicide: A Year on the Killing Streets. New York: Canongate Books.
AssessmentPaper analysing two writers, 1,500 words – 30% Research methods report, 1,000 words – 20% Creative Lifewriting folder, 2,500 words – 50%

CS5021-20 Sudden Prose

DepartmentCreative Writing
Module TitleSudden Prose
Module CodeCS5021-20SemesterOne
Study Hours22 contact/63 independentCredits20
Module DescriptionThis module introduces students to the prose poem and short- short story, partly through the forms themselves and partly through comparing them with lineated poetry and the short story, respectively. Thus the module not only teaches students these “sudden prose” genres but also strengthens their understanding of lineated poetry and short fiction more generally.
Weekly CalendarProse Poetry or Short-Short Fiction? Introduction to the two different forms. Prose poetry: Introduction to the form. Some important practitioners. Humour and the surreal in prose poetry. Revision techniques. Prose poetry in the literary marketplace. Short-short fiction: Introduction to the form. Some important practitioners. Humour and the surreal in the short-short story. Revision techniques. Short-short fiction in the literary marketplace.
BibliographyWild, P. (2007) The Flash: A Flash Fiction Anthology. London: Social Disease. Gonzalez, R. (2003) No Boundaries: Prose Poems by 24 American Poets. New York: Tupelo Press. The library subscribes to Quick Fiction and Sentence: A Journal of Prose Poetics and has the following titles: Andrews, N. (2007) Sleeping with Houdini. New York: BOA Editions. Andrews, N.(2008) The Book of Orgasms. Cleveland: Cleveland State University Poetry Center. Atwood, M. (2000) Murder in the Dark: Short Fictions and Prose Poems. London: Virago Press. Black, L. (2008) Inventory. Shearsman Books. London: Shearsman Books. Clary, K. (1996) Prose poetry by an English poet. New York: Oberlin College Press. Clary, K.(1990) Who Whispered Near Me. London: Farrar, Straus and Giroux. Crossley-Holland, K. (1998) Short! A Book of Very Short Stories. Oxford: OUP. Edson, R. (1994) The Tunnel: Selected Poems. New York: Oberlin College Press.
AssessmentPortfolio of writing-- 50% Author study -- 25% Market study -- 25%

CS5031-20 Genre Fiction

DepartmentCreative Writing
Module TitleGenre Fiction
Module CodeCS5031-20SemesterOne
Study Hours22 contact/63 independentCredits20
Module DescriptionThis module will examine four of the most popular types of genre fiction: Horror writing, Fantasy, Sci Fi, Romance, and Crime, and we will begin to understand how a reader’s expectations can dictate a writer’s choice of character, plot and language. By using contemporary fiction as examples we can also see how some writers are expanding or indeed subverting genres and that genre fiction writers are as passionate and committed to their craft as the winners of the Booker Prize. Central to the module is the way that all writing changes depending on the assumptions of both the reader and writer.
Weekly CalendarClasses 1 and 2: Romance – Rebecca (1938) by Daphne du Maurier and Welcome to Rosie Hopkins’ Sweetshop of Dreams (2013) by Jenny Colgan/ Classes 3 and 4: Horror – The Turn of the Screw (1898) by Henry James and Fight Club (1991) by Chuck Palahniuk/ Classes 5 and 6: Portfolio Tutorials / Classes 7 and 8: Dystopian Fantasy – Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep (1962) by Philip K Dick and Zoo City (2010) by Lauren Beukes/ Classes 9 and 10: Crime: The Postman Always Rings Twice (1934) by James M Cain and Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn (2012) /Class 11: Science Fiction: Solaris (1966) by Stanislaw Lem.
BibliographyWriting Horror Fiction, Paul Mills Writing Horror Fiction, Guy. N. Smithy Writing Romantic Fiction, Daphne Clair Write Your Own Fantasy, Pie Corbett Worlds of Wonder, How to Write Sci Fi and Fantasy, Gerrold David Writing Crime Fiction, Lesley Grant Adamson Writing Crime Fiction, H.R.F Keating On Writing, Stephen King
AssessmentA selection of work from the portfolio (2000 words or equivalent) -- 40% An analysis of four texts studied (2000 words or equivalent) -- 40% A case study of one contemporary genre writer (1000 words or equivalent) – 20%

CS5041-20 Feature Journalism

DepartmentCreative Writing
Module TitleFeature Journalism
Module CodeCS5041-20SemesterOne
Study Hours22 contact/63 independentCredits20
Module DescriptionThis module gives students the skills needed to begin writing features, articles and reviews for newspapers and magazines. Practical, step by step exercises are given in seminars, supported by special workshop sessions of intensive one-on-one examination of student writing by a tutor and/or peers.
Weekly CalendarWeek 1 – Introducing the module: What is feature journalism and its audience? What is “pitching” for publication? What should you expect from this module – and what it expects from you…
Week 2 to Week 10 – developing your feature writing skills and pitching work to editors of publications. Weekly sessions will generally include two strands – journalism skills, which will enable you to produce a high quality portfolio of journalism work for the first part of the assessment, and pitching your work, which will assist you in selling your feature ideas to editors of publications.
BibliographyCambridge, D. (2006) How to Write for Magazines in One Weekend. New York: Canal Street Publishing Ltd . Sova, D. (2007) How to Write Articles of Newspapers and Magazines. New York: Peterson's Guides,U.S. Jones, L. (2007) The Greatest Feelance Writing Tips in the World. London: The Greatest in the World Limited. Richardson, P. and Taylor, G. (2008) A Guide to the UK Publishing Industry. London: Publishers Association.
AssessmentA folder of 2,500 words of the student’s written work in journalism, containing at least three different articles, reviews or features and associated queries or correspondence – 50% Four, timed, on-line quizzes using the VLE. Quizzes will cover key issues in writing for the popular press and current events – 20% A journal of student submissions to publications, including student rationale for submission – 30%

CS6002-40 Researching and Writing a Novel

DepartmentCreative Writing
Module TitleResearching and Writing a Novel
Module CodeCS6002-40SemesterOne
Study Hours25 contact/127 independentCredits20
Module Description

This module will show you that writing a novel is not just a question of stretching a story to fill a bigger space, or padding out an idea until it fills a book. Thinking novelistically means extending your imaginative reach to new levels, deepening your understanding of your characters until they are indistinguishable from real people, and creating a world that a reader can live in for the days and weeks they might spend reading your novel. In this module, you will spend a significant amount of time learning about and discussing the importance of 'research' in writing extended prose fiction.

Weekly CalendarWeek 1 Memory, Imagination and Experience, starting points in fiction
Week 2 Inventing People, the importance of characters
Week 3 Things Happen - an exploration of plot
Week 4 Making it real – how to use research to convince your readers
Week 5 Which Person ? experiments with viewpoint.
Week 6 Where Things Happen – the importance of setting
Week 7 Learning to Talk - investigations into dialogue
Week 8 Characters have feelings too - writing about emotion
Week 9 Putting it all Together – structure, form, pacing
Week 10 Exercises in Style
Week 11 Combing Your Hair – the art of rewriting
BibliographyNicholson Baker – The Mezzanine Julian Barnes – (Arthur and George Arthur C Clarke – Rendezvous with Rama Mo Hayder –The Treatment Ian McEwan – Saturday Magnus Mills, Three to see the King Audrey Niffenegger, The Time Traveller’s Wife Dorothy Porter – The Monkey’s Mask W.G.Sebald – Austerlitz or The Rings of Saturn Carol Shields – Larry’s Party Ali Smith – The Accidental Elizabeth Taylor Angel BOOKS ABOUT WRITING A. Alvarez – The Writers’ Voice. Christopher Booker – The Seven Basic Plots Janet Burroway Writing Fiction: A Guide to Narrative Craft Anne Hoffmann – Research for Writers. John Gardner - On Becoming a Novelist Maura Dooley – How Novelists Work Steven Roger Fischer – A History of Reading Peter Brooks – Reading for the Plot Frank Kermode – The Sense of an Ending, Baker, N. (1998) The Mezzanine. New York: Granta Books. Mills, M. (2011) Three to see the King Audrey Niffenegger London: Bloomsbury Paperbacks.
AssessmentNovel Synopsis = 20% Creative Piece (1,500 – 2,000 words) = 40% Research Folder= 40%

CS6006-40 Planning and Writing a Novel for Young People

DepartmentCreative Writing
Module TitlePlanning and Writing a Novel for Young People
Module CodeCS6006-40SemesterOne
Study Hours30 contact/150 independentCredits20
AbstractThe Advanced Writing for Young People module is an opportunity to pursue a piece of writing in depth and at length. It is designed to give students the chance to develop their ideas, build scenes and make decisions about the structure of their work through exploration of character and plot. You will be encouraged to read as a writer, analysing the work of other writers and making notes of lessons you have drawn from their work. We will also be looking at examples in class. During this time you will work on developing your planning folder, where you will reflect upon, and show evidence of, the process of planning your novel. You will also start to experiment with writing possible scenes from your novel and, as it begins to take shape, focus particularly on writing a strong opening chapter.
Weekly CalendarWeekly sessions will contain a mixture of short talks given by your tutor on a particular topic, writing exercises, and workshops. Students will spend a certain amount of time in small groups discussing each other’s work. There will also be the opportunity to discuss your work with your tutor on a one-to-one basis.
BibliographyKing, S. (2000) On Writing. London: Hodder & Stoughton. Blake, C. (1999) From Pitch to Publication. London: Macmillan. Children’s Writers & Artists' Yearbook. London: AC & Black. Other key texts will vary depending on the individual project. Students are expected to compile their own reading list and produce an annotated bibliography.
AssessmentPlanning Folder = 40% Opening Chapter = 50% Participation = 10%

CS6022-20 Professional Writing

DepartmentCreative Writing
Module TitleProfessional Writing
Module CodeCS6022-20SemesterOne
Study Hours17 contact/68 independentCredits20
Module DescriptionThis module teaches students how to handle text professionally and focuses on key skills and their application in a variety of industry contexts. Skills taught include: copywriting, text editing, web content management, and presentation skills (written and spoken).
Weekly CalendarCopywriting: Writing concisely; Writing accurately; Audience; Working with text and image; Industry writing standards. Text editing: Different types of editing: appropriateness of tone, level, content; word length (i.e. cutting); structure. Following a stylesheet; Proof reading. Web content: Blogging; Social network marketing. Professional Presentation skills: Research and planning; Structure; Prioritisation of content audience; Powerpoint. Project management: Managing your time, and organising your portfolio professionally.
BibliographyForsyth, P. (2013) How to Write Reports and Proposals: Creating Success. Croydon: Kogan Page Ltd. Baverstock, A. (2008) How to Market Books: The Essential Guide to Maximizing Profit and Exploiting All Channels to Market. India: Kogan Page Ltd. Fisk, P. (2006) Marketing. Genius. Chichester: Capstone. Baverstock, A., Carey, S. and Bowen, S. 2008 How to Get a Job in Publishing: A Really Practical Guide to Careers in Books and Magazines. London: A & C Black Publishers Ltd. Robert, W. ( 2007) The Copywriter's Handbook: A Step-by-step Guide to Writing Copy That Sells. New York: Owl Books. Moor, L. ( 2007) The Rise of Brands. London: Bloomsbury Academic. Ritter, R. M., Stevenson, A., and Brown, L. (2005) The New Oxford Dictionary for Writers and Editors. Oxford: OUP. Truss, L. (2009) Eats, Shoots, and Leaves. London: Fourth Estate. Trask, R. (2004) The Penguin Guide to Punctuation. London: Penguin Reference Books . Trask, R. (2005) The Penguin Dictionary of English Grammar. London: Penguin Reference Books. The Bookseller magazine is available in the print edition and online at Newton Park Library and in the Publishing Lab. Text editing Harris, Nicola, Basic Editing (London: Publishing Training Centre, 1991). Ritter, R., Stevenson, A. and Brown, L. (2005) The New Oxford Dictionary for Writers and Editors. Oxford: OUP. Butcher, J., Drake, C. and Leach, M. (2006) Butcher's Copy- editing: The Cambridge Handbook for Editors, Copy-editors and Proofreaders. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Oxford University Press. Style Manual. (2004) Oxford: OUP. Marsh, D. ( 2007) Guardian Style. London: Guardian Books. Quinn, S. (2004) Digital Sub-editing and Design. London: Focal Press.
AssessmentPresentation/report = 20% Portfolio of professional writing samples = 80%

CS6025-20 Teaching Writing

DepartmentCreative Writing
Module TitleTeaching Writing
Module CodeCS6025-20SemesterOne
Study Hours17 contact/68 independentCredits10
AbstractThis module aims to introduce participants to the theory and practice of teaching writing to individuals and groups. It gives students practical teaching experience, as well as an understanding of the relevant pedagogy necessary to develop a professional teaching practice.
Weekly CalendarIntroduction to the module; Career pathways and Learning Contracts; Teaching Pedagogy; Creative Writing Pedagogy; Reflective Practice; Planning Workshops and Seminars; Writing Lesson Plans 1:1. Tutoring; Professional Practice/Teaching Observations; Teaching Practice – 10 minute micro-sessions and observations; Preparing Your Portfolio – CVs and CPD.
BibliographyCowley, S. (2004) Getting the Buggers to Write 2. London: Continuum. Greetham, B. (2008) How to Write Better Essays 2nd Ed. Basingstoke: Palgrave. Peck, J. and Coyle, M. (2005) Write it Right. Basingstoke: Palgrave. Petty, G. (2009) Teaching Today: a practical guide. 4th Ed. London: NelsonThornes. Race, P. and Pickford, R. (2007) Making Teaching Work. London: Sage. Ryan, L. and Zimmerelli, L. (2006) The Bedford Guide for Writing Tutors. 4th Ed. Boston: Bedford Books. Martin’s. Coffin, C. et al. (2003) Teaching Academic Writing. London: Routledge.
AssessmentLearning Contract = Pass/Fail Learning and Practice Journal = Pass/Fail Summative: Critical Essay (2,500 words) = 50% Professional portfolio (Reflective Essay, CPD plan, CV, lesson plans, teaching observations) (2,500 words approx.) = 50%

Semester 2

CS4001-40 Writer's Workshop 1

DepartmentCreative Writing
Module TitleWriter's Workshop 1
Module CodeCS4001-40SemesterTwo
Study Hours56 contact/166 independentCredits20
Module Description"This module will offer students practice and help with different genres of writing, experimentation and workshopping of student writing, as well as requiring attendance at lectures and plenary events. The
students also work on a group project of their choice and present the results in lectures or seminars.
Weekly CalendarWeek One: Nonfiction/Autobiography Week Two: Performance Poetry. Week Three: Poetry on the Page. Week Four: Poetry 2: Line Breaks and Punctuation. Week Five: Creative Group Work. Week Six: Introduction to the Creative Project Report. Week Seven: Project Work and Performances. Week Eight: Project Work and Performances. Week Nine: Scriptwriting 1. Week Ten: Scriptwriting 2. Week Eleven: Revising Script, Poetry and Nonfiction. Week Twelve: Revision 2. Week Thirteen: Student Readings.
BibliographyNew Hart's Rules
AssessmentPortfolio of student work, group project, report on events attended

CS4002-20 Explorations in Prose Fiction

DepartmentCreative Writing
Module TitleExplorations in Prose Fiction
Module CodeCS4002-20SemesterTBC
Study Hours28 contact/80 independentCredits20
Module DescriptionSemesterised module (full credit for students just attending one half of academic year) This module aims to make students confident and versatile writers and readers prose fiction. It will concentrate on both the technical/grammatical elements of prose, ensuring that students have a sound understanding of its constituent parts, alongside an awareness of the wide ranging genres and styles that writers have used.
Weekly CalendarWeek One: Introduction to Prose Fiction. Week Two: William Styron: Case Study. Week Three: Tristram Shandy. Week Four: Holes. Week Five: The Talented Mr Ripley. Week Six: Black Water. Week Seven: The Martian Chronicles. Week Eight: Speak, Memory. Week Nine: Red Dragon. Week Ten: Elephant. Week Eleven: The Shipping News. Week Twelve: Feedback Tutorials Week Thirteen: Feedback Tutorials.
BibliographyA selection of the following texts will be used: Proulx, A. (2009) The Shipping News; Vladimir Nabokov. New York: Scribner. Fire, P., Burgess, A. (2000) A Clockwork Orange. London: Penguin. Sterne, L. Shandy, T. (2011) The Book of Revelation. London: Canongate Books. Beckett, S., Cummings E.E (2002) The Enormous Room. New York: Dover Publications. Calvino, I. (1998) If on a Winters Night a Traveller. New York: Harcourt Brace International. Camus, A. (2008) The Plague. London: Vintage International. Almond, D. (2013) Skellig. London: Hodder Children's Books. Gaiman, N. (2009) The Graveyard Book. London: Bloomsbury Publishing PLC. Sachar, L. (2000) Holes. London: Bloomsbury Publishing PLC. Charles, R. (2007) Spin. Berlin:Tor Books. Ballard, JG.(2014) Concrete Island. London: Fourth Estate. Hoban, R. (2012) Ridley Walker. London: Bloomsbury Paperbacks. Le Guin, U. (1993) The Earthsea Quartet. Penguin: London. Simmons, D. (2005) Hyperion. New York: Gollancz. Harries, T. (2009) Red Dragon. London: Arrow. Stoker, B. (1993) Dracula. London: Wordsworth Editions. Ligotti, T. (2008) Teatro Grottesco. London: Virgin Books. Auster, P. (2011) The New York Trilogy. London: Faber & Faber. Elroy, J. (1994) LA Confidential. London: Arrow. Deighton, L. (2009) The Ipcress File. London: Harper. Highsmith, P. (2008) the Talented Mr Ripley. London: W. W. Norton & Company. Eyre, J., Bronte C. and Euginedes, J. (2009) The Virgin Suicides. New York: Picador. Updike, J. (1996) Couples. New York: Random House Trade Paperbacks. Rhys, J. (1999) Good Morning, Midnight. W. W. London: Norton & Company. Kafka, F. (2000) Metamorphosis and Other Stories. New York: Dover Publications Inc. O’Connor, F. (1982) Collected Stories. New York: Vintage. Carver, R. (2009) Collected Stories. New York: Library of America. Bradbury, R .(2008) The Martian Chronicles. London: Harper Voyager. Crace, J.(2010) Being Dead. New York: Picador. Perec, G. (1996) Life, A User’s Manual. London: Vintage. Johnson, B.S. (1999) The Unfortunates. New York: Picador. O’Brien, F. (2000) At Swim-Two-Birds. London: Penguin Classics. Students will also study short sample texts from non-fictional genres – such as advertising copy, legal documents, academic essays, instruction manuals, blogs and other new media.
Assessment2,500 word sample(s) of prose fiction (50%) 2,500 word study of a key text (or texts) in relation to the student’s own work (50%)

CS4003-20 Reading to Write Poetry

DepartmentCreative Writing
Module TitleReading to Write Poetry
Module CodeCS4003-20SemesterTwo
Study Hours28 contact/80 independentCredits20
AbstractThis module is designed to teach students the fundamental importance of reading to the writing of poetry. They will be taught that the progression of the writing will not be possible without a capacity to read poetry intelligently.
Weekly CalendarIntroduction; the line and stanza; visualization; the music of words; analysing poems and individual poem analysis paper; lyric and narrative; poetry and influence; poetry and the personal; other poetries; poetry and surprise; revision; performance and publication.
BibliographyAstley, N. (2002) Staying Alive: Real Poems for Unreal Times. New York: Bloodaxe Books Ltd. Padel, R. (2004) Fifty Two Ways of Looking at a Poem. London: Vintage. Herbert, W. and Hollis, M. (2000) Strong Words. New York: Bloodaxe Books Ltd. Pollen, W. 1995. Essays on Poetry. London: Faber & Faber. Ted Hughes, Faber and Faber. Websites [Online] www.uk.poetryinternationalweb.org www.poetrymagazines.org.uk www.poetrysociety.org.uk www.poetryarchive.org
AssessmentCreative Folder of Poems (8-10 poems, or number agreed at tutor’s discretion – 1500 words or equivalent) – 50% Analysis of Individual Poem (1000 words or equivalent) – 5% Reading Paper (2500 words plus appendices to include review of Poetry series reading and any other support material) – 45%

CS4004-20 Introduction to Scriptwriting

DepartmentCreative Writing
Module TitleIntroduction to Scriptwriting
Module CodeCS4004-20SemesterTwo
Study Hours28 contact/80 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionThe module will introduce students to the craft of scriptwriting. All kinds of scripts will be covered and compared, so that the basic generic differences between (say) theatre and radio scriptwriting are established. The module will also deal with the varying routes and processes by which scripts get into performance.
Weekly CalendarSoap: brainstorming and premise; basic dramatic structure; layout and formatting; scene analysis and creation; examining a stage play; examining a screenplay;examining a radio play; creating dialogue; the business of scriptwriting; reading, viewing and listening to script; student readings and performances of their work.
BibliographyCarter, D. (1999) Teach Yourself How to Write a Play. New York: NTC Publishing Group. Field, S. (2003) The Definitive Guide to Screenwriting. London: Ebury Press. McKee, R. (1999) Story: Substance, Structure, Style and the Principles of Screenwriting, New York: ReganBooks. MacLoughlin, S. (2008) Writing for Radio. London: Soundplay. Smethurst, W. (2009) Writing for Television,. London: How To Books.
Assessment1. The Creative Folder (3000 words maximum) will contain selected pieces of creative work written for the module. – 50% 2. The Context Folder (2000 words maximum) – 40% 3. Class Participation – 10%

CS5002-20 Short Stories

DepartmentCreative Writing
Module TitleShort Stories
Module CodeCS5002-20SemesterTwo
Study Hours28 contact/80 independentCredits20
Module DescriptionThis module has two aims: 1) To introduce the student to the short story form and to enable them to understand how writers across all the genres of short story-writing achieve their goals, and 2) To use the short story form as the basis upon which the student can explore further and in more detail the elements of narrative fiction. The student will be expected to complete a number of short stories for their final submission.
Weekly Calendar1 Introduction; 1-page stories in preparation for sharing the following week/ 2 a: Miniature Narratives: Chekhov, Kafka, Williams, Schulz, Rhys b: workshopping 1-page stories/ 3 a: Miniature Narratives: Moravia, Borowski, Calvino, Gordimer, Padgett, Carey b: workshopping 1-page stories/ 4 a: Miniature Narratives/Dramatic Monologues: Dybek, Lightman, Oates, Martinb: workshopping 1-page stories/ 5 a: Early Stories: Kafka, Hemingway, Cheever, Updike b: workshopping 2-page stories/ 6 a: Narratives in Other Modes: Hawthorne, Thoreau, Woolf, Borges, Updike, b: workshopping 2-page stories/ 7 a: Narratives in Other Modes/Poems That Tell Stories: Kingston, Frost, Gilmore b: workshopping 2-page stories/ 8 a: Classics and Contemporaries: Lawrence, Carver, Atwood b: workshopping 2-page stories/ 9 a: Classics and Contemporaries: Heyen, Boyle, Frazier, Banks, Oatesb: workshopping 2-page stories/ 10 TUTORIAL FEEDBACK ON COURSEWORK DRAFTS/ 11 Workshopping of remaining or extra submissions
BibliographyOates, C. (1998) Telling Stories: An Anthology for Writers. New York: Norton.
Assessment2,500 word author study -- 50% 2,500 word folder of short stories -- 50%

CS5003-20 Form and Listening in Poetry

DepartmentCreative Writing
Module TitleForm and Listening in Poetry
Module CodeCS5003-20SemesterTwo
Study Hours28 contact/80 independentCredits20
Module DescriptionYou will be encouraged to explore two important poetry issues: firstly, what forms are available to a poet wishing to expand his/her poetics; and secondly, who is it that is being addressed when a poem is written? You will tackle all the traditional forms available: sonnet, villanelle, sestina, pantoum, blank verse, free verse, and so forth. The object of this is to show you how form will assist in the control and focusing of poems. At the same time, having studied an individual form, you will be actively encouraged to subvert the form as much as possible: to make a form your own.
Weekly Calendar1 Introduction; 1-page stories in preparation for sharing the following week/ 2 a: Miniature Narratives: Chekhov, Kafka, Williams, Schulz, Rhys b: workshopping 1-page stories/ 3 a: Miniature Narratives: Moravia, Borowski, Calvino, Gordimer, Padgett, Carey b: workshopping 1-page stories/ 4 a: Miniature Narratives/Dramatic Monologues: Dybek, Lightman, Oates, Martinb: workshopping 1-page stories/ 5 a: Early Stories: Kafka, Hemingway, Cheever, Updikeb: workshopping 2-page stories/ 6 a: Narratives in Other Modes: Hawthorne, Thoreau, Woolf, Borges, Updike, b: workshopping 2-page stories/ 7 a: Narratives in Other Modes/Poems That Tell Stories: Kingston, Frost, Gilmore b: workshopping 2-page stories/ 8 a: Classics and Contemporaries: Lawrence, Carver, Atwood b: workshopping 2-page stories/ 9 a: Classics and Contemporaries: Heyen, Boyle, Frazier, Banks, Oatesb: workshopping 2-page stories/ 10 TUTORIAL FEEDBACK ON COURSEWORK DRAFTS/ 11 Workshopping of remaining or extra submissions
BibliographyPadel, R. (2002 ) 52 Ways of Looking at a Poem: Or How Reading Modern Poetry Can Change Your Life. London: Chatto and Windus.
AssessmentCreative Folder of Poems (8-10 poems, or number agreed at tutor’s discretion – 1500 words or equivalent) -- 50% Mini paper (1000 words or equivalent) -- 10% Reading Paper (2500 words plus appendices to include review of Poetry series reading and any other support material) -- 40%

CS5004-20 Writing for Theatre

DepartmentCreative Writing
Module TitleWriting for Theatre
Module CodeCS5004-20SemesterTwo
Study Hours28 contact/80 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionThis module combines a historical study of the developing relations between theatre space and dramatic language with the writing of students' own plays designed for a particular theatre. The first project for this module is to identify two modern plays that inspire you and write a 3,000 word essay on the components that go to make those plays successful - comparing and contrasting their various elements. In the second part of the module each of you will write a ‘short form’ play. This is basically a 20 minute script. It is not the first 20 minutes of a play, but a play where the entire story takes 20 minutes to show on stage.
Weekly CalendarOverview: the changing relations of theatre space to world-view; how language operates in theatre; physical aspects of performance independent of language; sessions devoted to writing student plays designed for a particular kind of theatre; workshop on essay; individual tutorial preparing for submission;student performances; feedback session
BibliographyKing, D. (2011) Foxfinder. Nick Hern Books
AssessmentAn analysis of two contrasting plays and their staging – 50% A script for a complete short play lasting no longer than 15 minutes, including a description of the intended theatre -- 50%

CS5005-20 Lifewriting

DepartmentCreative Writing
Module TitleLifewriting
Module CodeCS5005-20SemesterTwo
Study Hours28 contact/80 independentCredits20
Module DescriptionIn this module you learn to write nonfiction for a general reader. This is not academic writing, and it is not like an essay. Instead, you use the same methods you already know for creative writing. You tell a story, about other people, with characters, and a beginning, a middle and an end. You pick a topic you want to write about. You can write about the night shift in A and E, a vet who helps a lot of homeless people with their dogs, your grandfather's military service, the fortunes of a local band, an anti-fracking camp, teaching sky diving, disused mines near Bath, the threatened extinction of frogs, trading futures in the oil market, badgers – anything.
Weekly CalendarResearch methods; telling a story in nonfiction; writing a scene in nonfiction using dialogue, action and description. How do I keep someone else's voice whilst writing in my own? Specific incident or whole decade? Choosing an interviewee or an historical subject to write about; developing an ear for speech: voice, vocabulary, gesture. How to edit the 'what' of your story. This is finding what your story is really about. How to use detail to carry a big message. Looking at life from someone else's perspective. Context. (Life doesn't happen in a vacuum.)
BibliographyA reading list might include: A reading list might include: Junger, S (2006) The Perfect Storm. London: Harper Perennial. Fuller, A. (2003) Don't Let's Go to the Dogs Tonight: An African Childhood. London: Picador. MacMasters, A. (2006) Stuart: A Life Lived Backwards. London: Fourth Estate. Rodriguez, D. (2014) The Kabul Beauty School. London: Sphere. Simon, D. (2009) Homicide: A Year on the Killing Streets. New York: Canongate Books.
AssessmentPaper analysing two writers, 1,500 words – 30% Research methods report, 1,000 words – 20% Creative Lifewriting folder, 2,500 words – 50%

CS5007-20 Writing for New Media

DepartmentCreative Writing
Module TitleWriting for New Media
Module CodeCS5007-20SemesterTwo
Study Hours28 contact/80 independentCredits20
Module DescriptionThis module takes you through the various possibilities of writing for new media. New technologies challenge us to redefine the writing process, the "texts" we produce, and their reception by audiences. New media is both the creation of texts through the use of new technologies and the new use of older technologies and forms of media.
Weekly CalendarMaking a ""digital audit"" of your own writing; blogging; digital fiction; writing for social media; digital non-fiction; literary apps; electronic literature; copyright issues; online reviewing; ebooks; commercial opportunities in new media; website copy; writing for mobile devices, writing for games, in-class help/preparation/discussion of e-portfolios.
BibliographyHirst, M. (2006) Communication and New Media: From Broadcast to Narrowcast. Oxford: OUP. Bonime, A. and Pohlmann, K. (1998) Writing for New Media: The Essential Guide to Writing for Interactive Media. Canada: Wiley & Sons. Inc. CD-ROMs, and the Web.
AssessmentPortfolio of writing – 50% Reflective essay – 50%

CS5021-20 Sudden Prose

DepartmentCreative Writing
Module TitleSudden Prose
Module CodeCS5021-20SemesterTwo
Study Hours28 contact/80 independentCredits20
Module DescriptionThis module introduces students to the prose poem and short- short story, partly through the forms themselves and partly through comparing them with lineated poetry and the short story, respectively. Thus the module not only teaches students these “sudden prose” genres but also strengthens their understanding of lineated poetry and short fiction more generally.
Weekly CalendarProse Poetry or Short-Short Fiction? Introduction to the two different forms. Prose poetry: Introduction to the form. Some important practitioners. Humour and the surreal in prose poetry. Revision techniques. Prose poetry in the literary marketplace. Short-short fiction: Introduction to the form. Some important practitioners. Humour and the surreal in the short-short story. Revision techniques. Short-short fiction in the literary marketplace.
BibliographyWild, P. (2007) The Flash: A Flash Fiction Anthology. London: Social Disease. Gonzalez, R. (2003) No Boundaries: Prose Poems by 24 American Poets. New York: Tupelo Press. The library subscribes to Quick Fiction and Sentence: A Journal of Prose Poetics and has the following titles: Andrews, N. (2007) Sleeping with Houdini. New York: BOA Editions. Andrews, N.(2008) The Book of Orgasms. Cleveland: Cleveland State University Poetry Center. Atwood, M. (2000) Murder in the Dark: Short Fictions and Prose Poems. London: Virago Press. Black, L. (2008) Inventory. Shearsman Books. London: Shearsman Books. Clary, K. (1996) Prose poetry by an English poet. New York: Oberlin College Press. Clary, K.(1990) Who Whispered Near Me. London: Farrar, Straus and Giroux. Crossley-Holland, K. (1998) Short! A Book of Very Short Stories. Oxford: OUP. Edson, R. (1994) The Tunnel: Selected Poems. New York: Oberlin College Press.
AssessmentPortfolio of writing-- 50% Author study -- 25% Market study -- 25%

CS5031-20 Genre Fiction

DepartmentCreative Writing
Module TitleGenre Fiction
Module CodeCS5031-20SemesterTwo
Study Hours28 contact/80 independentCredits20
Module DescriptionThis module will examine four of the most popular types of genre fiction: Horror writing, Fantasy, Sci Fi, Romance, and Crime, and we will begin to understand how a reader’s expectations can dictate a writer’s choice of character, plot and language. By using contemporary fiction as examples we can also see how some writers are expanding or indeed subverting genres and that genre fiction writers are as passionate and committed to their craft as the winners of the Booker Prize. Central to the module is the way that all writing changes depending on the assumptions of both the reader and writer.
Weekly CalendarClasses 1 and 2: Romance – Rebecca (1938) by Daphne du Maurier and Welcome to Rosie Hopkins’ Sweetshop of Dreams (2013) by Jenny Colgan/ Classes 3 and 4: Horror – The Turn of the Screw (1898) by Henry James and Fight Club (1991) by Chuck Palahniuk/ Classes 5 and 6: Portfolio Tutorial / Classes 7 and 8: Dystopian Fantasy – Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep (1962) by Philip K Dick and Zoo City (2010) by Lauren Beukes/ Classes 9 and 10: Crime: The Postman Always Rings Twice (1934) by James M Cain and Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn (2012)/ Classes 11 and 12: Science Fiction: Solaris (1966) by Stanislaw Lem and A Conspiracy of Alchemists (2012) by Liesel Schwarz/ Class 13 will be devoted to coursework tutorials.
BibliographyWriting Horror Fiction, Paul Mills Writing Horror Fiction, Guy. N. Smithy Writing Romantic Fiction, Daphne Clair Write Your Own Fantasy, Pie Corbett Worlds of Wonder, How to Write Sci Fi and Fantasy, Gerrold David Writing Crime Fiction, Lesley Grant Adamson Writing Crime Fiction, H.R.F Keating On Writing, Stephen King
AssessmentA selection of work from the portfolio (2000 words or equivalent) -- 40% An analysis of four texts studied (2000 words or equivalent) -- 40% A case study of one contemporary genre writer (1000 words or equivalent) – 20%

CS5041-20 Feature Journalism

DepartmentCreative Writing
Module TitleFeature Journalism
Module CodeCS5041-20SemesterTwo
Study Hours28 contact/80 independentCredits20
Module DescriptionThis module gives students the skills needed to begin writing features, articles and reviews for newspapers and magazines. Practical, step by step exercises are given in seminars, supported by special workshop sessions of intensive one-on-one examination of student writing by a tutor and/or peers.
Weekly CalendarWeek 1 – Introducing the module: What is feature journalism and its audience? What is “pitching” for publication? What should you expect from this module – and what it expects from you…
Week 2 to Week 10 – developing your feature writing skills and pitching work to editors of publications. Weekly sessions will generally include two strands – journalism skills, which will enable you to produce a high quality portfolio of journalism work for the first part of the assessment, and pitching your work, which will assist you in selling your feature ideas to editors of publications.
BibliographyCambridge, D. (2006) How to Write for Magazines in One Weekend. New York: Canal Street Publishing Ltd . Sova, D. (2007) How to Write Articles of Newspapers and Magazines. New York: Peterson's Guides,U.S. Jones, L. (2007) The Greatest Feelance Writing Tips in the World. London: The Greatest in the World Limited. Richardson, P. and Taylor, G. (2008) A Guide to the UK Publishing Industry. London: Publishers Association.
AssessmentA folder of 2,500 words of the student’s written work in journalism, containing at least three different articles, reviews or features and associated queries or correspondence – 50% Four, timed, on-line quizzes using the VLE. Quizzes will cover key issues in writing for the popular press and current events – 20% A journal of student submissions to publications, including student rationale for submission – 30%

CS6022-20 Professional Writing

DepartmentCreative Writing
Module TitleProfessional Writing
Module CodeCS6022-20SemesterTwo
Study Hours21 contact/87 independentCredits20
Module DescriptionThis module teaches students how to handle text professionally and focuses on key skills and their application in a variety of industry contexts. Skills taught include: copywriting, text editing, web content management, and presentation skills (written and spoken).
Weekly CalendarCopywriting: Writing concisely; Writing accurately; Audience; Working with text and image; Industry writing standards. Text editing: Different types of editing: appropriateness of tone, level, content; word length (i.e. cutting); structure. Following a stylesheet; Proof reading. Web content: Blogging; Social network marketing. Professional Presentation skills: Research and planning; Structure; Prioritisation of content audience; Powerpoint. Project management: Managing your time, and organising your portfolio professionally.
BibliographyForsyth, P. (2013) How to Write Reports and Proposals: Creating Success. Croydon: Kogan Page Ltd. Baverstock, A. (2008) How to Market Books: The Essential Guide to Maximizing Profit and Exploiting All Channels to Market. India: Kogan Page Ltd. Fisk, P. (2006) Marketing. Genius. Chichester: Capstone. Baverstock, A., Carey, S. and Bowen, S. 2008 How to Get a Job in Publishing: A Really Practical Guide to Careers in Books and Magazines. London: A & C Black Publishers Ltd. Robert, W. ( 2007) The Copywriter's Handbook: A Step-by-step Guide to Writing Copy That Sells. New York: Owl Books. Moor, L. ( 2007) The Rise of Brands. London: Bloomsbury Academic. Ritter, R. M., Stevenson, A., and Brown, L. (2005) The New Oxford Dictionary for Writers and Editors. Oxford: OUP. Truss, L. (2009) Eats, Shoots, and Leaves. London: Fourth Estate. Trask, R. (2004) The Penguin Guide to Punctuation. London: Penguin Reference Books . Trask, R. (2005) The Penguin Dictionary of English Grammar. London: Penguin Reference Books. The Bookseller magazine is available in the print edition and online at Newton Park Library and in the Publishing Lab. Text editing Harris, Nicola, Basic Editing (London: Publishing Training Centre, 1991). Ritter, R., Stevenson, A. and Brown, L. (2005) The New Oxford Dictionary for Writers and Editors. Oxford: OUP. Butcher, J., Drake, C. and Leach, M. (2006) Butcher's Copy- editing: The Cambridge Handbook for Editors, Copy-editors and Proofreaders. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Oxford University Press. Style Manual. (2004) Oxford: OUP. Marsh, D. ( 2007) Guardian Style. London: Guardian Books. Quinn, S. (2004) Digital Sub-editing and Design. London: Focal Press.
AssessmentPresentation/report = 20% Portfolio of professional writing samples = 80%

CS6025-20 Teaching Writing

DepartmentCreative Writing
Module TitleTeaching Writing
Module CodeCS6025-20SemesterTwo
Study Hours21 contact/87 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionThis module aims to introduce participants to the theory and practice of teaching writing to individuals and groups. It gives students practical teaching experience, as well as an understanding of the relevant pedagogy necessary to develop a professional teaching practice.
Weekly CalendarIntroduction to the module; Career pathways and Learning Contracts; Teaching Pedagogy; Creative Writing Pedagogy; Reflective Practice; Planning Workshops and Seminars; Writing Lesson Plans 1:1. Tutoring; Professional Practice/Teaching Observations; Teaching Practice – 10 minute micro-sessions and observations; Preparing Your Portfolio – CVs and CPD.
BibliographyCowley, S. (2004) Getting the Buggers to Write 2. London: Continuum. Greetham, B. (2008) How to Write Better Essays 2nd Ed. Basingstoke: Palgrave. Peck, J. and Coyle, M. (2005) Write it Right. Basingstoke: Palgrave. Petty, G. (2009) Teaching Today: a practical guide. 4th Ed. London: NelsonThornes. Race, P. and Pickford, R. (2007) Making Teaching Work. London: Sage. Ryan, L. and Zimmerelli, L. (2006) The Bedford Guide for Writing Tutors. 4th Ed. Boston: Bedford Books. Martin’s. Coffin, C. et al. (2003) Teaching Academic Writing. London: Routledge.
AssessmentLearning Contract = Pass/Fail Learning and Practice Journal = Pass/Fail Summative: Critical Essay (2,500 words) = 50% Professional portfolio (Reflective Essay, CPD plan, CV, lesson plans, teaching observations) (2,500 words approx.) = 50%

Dance

Semester 1

DA4011-40 - Creative Dance Practice 1

DepartmentDance
Module TitleCreative Dance Practice 1
Module CodeDA4011-40SemesterOne
Study Hours44 contact/130 independentCredits20
Module DescriptionThis module aims to provide you with the skills and confidence you need to engage in a range of creative dance practices. You will be introduced to a series of choreographic methodologies through practical studio based tasks and explorations, and through the investigation and analysis of your own work and the work of key practitioners. In addition, the module will develop your understanding of the historical, cultural and social context in which we dance and view dance and how this might inform the construction of choreography. This module is only suitable for students with previous dance experience.
Weekly CalendarTBC
BibliographyAdshead, J. (1988) Dance Analysis. London: Dance Books. Anderson, J. (1997) Art Without Boundaries. London: Dance Books. Banes, S. (1987) Terpsichore in Sneakers. 4th Ed. Hanover, NH: Wesleyan University Press. Blom, L. A. & Chaplin, L. (1979) The Intimate Act of Choreography. London: Dance Books. Blom, L.A. & Chaplin, L. (1979) The Moment of Movement. London: Dance Books. Brown, M.J. and Mindin, N. & Woodford, C. H. (1998) The Vision of Modern Dance. London: Dance Books. Butterworth, J. and Wildschut, L. (2009) Contemporary Choreography: A Critical 30 Reader. Oxon: Routledge. Carter, A. (1998) The Routledge Dance Studies Reader. 2nd Ed. London: The Routledge Dance Studies Reader. Cohen, S.J. (1992) Dance as a Theatre Art. 2nd Ed. Pennington. New Jersey: Princetown Book Company. Mackrell, J. (1992) Out of Line : The story of British New Dance. London: Dance Books. Mackrell, J. (1997) Reading Dance. London: Michael Joseph Ltd. Minton, S.C. (1997) Choreography: a basic approach using improvisation. Leeds: Human Kinetics. Preston-Dunlop, V. and Sanchez, C.(2002) A Dance and the Performative: A Choreological Perspective. London: Yale University Press. Sofras, P.A (2006) New Haven and London: Craft. London: Human Kinetics Europe Ltd.
Assessment1) Choreographic Project 2) Written Essay of 2000 words

DA4012-20 - Dance and Performance Technique 1: Codified Technique (Level 1)

DepartmentDance
Module TitleDance and Performance Technique 1: Codified Technique (Level 1)
Module CodeDA4012-20SemesterOne
Study Hours22 contact/63 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionThe aim of this module is to develop your skills and understanding of the body as an expressive and physical instrument. This class specifically addresses issues related to body awareness, physical dynamics and the development of flexibility, strength and stamina. You will become increasingly confident in your physical capabilities and potential through the investigation of codified movement vocabulary. You will be introduced to the principles of good working practice that will provide the basis for future learning and progress. The techniques of Cunningham, Limon, Graham and Release are incorporated into this class.
Weekly CalendarTBC
BibliographyCaldwell, C. (2001) Dance and Dancers Injuries. London: Dance Books. Cunningham Dance Technique: 1 Elementary Level. (1985) DVD. Cunningham, M. and Caplan, E. New York, NY: Cunningham Dance Foundation. Howse, J. (2000). Dance Technique and Injury Prevention. London: A & C Black. Legg, J. (2011). Introduction to modern dance techniques : Cunningham, Dunham, Graham, Hawkins, Horton, Humphrey, Limón, Nikolais/Louis, Taylor. NJ: Princeton.
AssessmentPractical Assessment week 11

DA4013-20 - Somatic Improvisation

DepartmentDance
Module TitleSomatic Improvisation
Module CodeDA4013-20SemesterOne
Study Hours22 contact/63 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionThis module aims to introduce students to a more holistic perception of the body through the study of somatic practices that teach the art of listening and encourage a deeper awareness and understanding of the self. The module focuses on exploring the body in terms of its form, structure and function, and lived experience of the world, through an anatomical, physiological and kinesthetic approach. The study of recognised somatic techniques will be combined with a study of the neuro-muscular- skeletal systems and their application to human movement. The intention is to enhance body knowledge, sensitivity and awareness, develop improvisation skills and performance presence and promote creativity.
Weekly CalendarTBC
BibliographyBales, M. & Nettl-Fiol, R. (2008) The Body Eclectic: Evolving Practices in Dance Training. Urbana & Chicago: University of Illinois Press. Bernard, A. (1997) Ideokinesis and Creative Body Alignment. Contact Quarterly: Summer/Fall. Brodie, J. and Lobel, E. (2012) Dance and Somatics: Mind-Body Principles of Teaching and Performance. Jefferson, North Carolina: McFarland & Company, Inc. Publishers. Calais-Germain, B. (1993) Anatomy of Movement, Great Britain: Eastland Press. Calais-Germain, B. (2006) Anatomy of Breathing, USA: Eastland Press Ltd. Fraleigh, S. (2009) Land to Water Yoga: Shin Somatics Moving Way. USA: Global Authors Publishers. Johnson, D.H. (1995) Bone, Breath and Gesture: Practices of Embodiment. Berkeley: North Atlantic Books. Olsen, A. (1997) Bodystories: A Guide to Experiential Anatomy. New York: Statin Hill Press. Park, G (1997) The Art of Changing: A New Approach to Alexander Technique. Bath : Ashgrove Press Ltd. Sweigard, Lulu E. (1988) Human Movement Potential: Its Ideokinetic Facilitation. New York Harper & Row. Publishers. Todd, M (1997) The Thinking Body. London: Dance Books. Journals: Stark-Smith, N. (Ed) Contact Quarterly. Northampton, USA. S. Whatley (Ed) Journal of Dance & Somatic Practices. Coventry: Intellect books.
AssessmentFormative Assessments 1. Presentation of class exercises 2. Reflective journal submissions Summative Assessments 1. Continual Practical Presentations 60% 2. Essay (2000 words) 40%

DA4014-20 - Digital Performance Practice 1

DepartmentDance
Module TitleDigital Performance Practice 1
Module CodeDA4014-20SemesterOne
Study Hours22 contact/63 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionThis module is an introductory investigation into the performance potential of digital media. It provides practical understanding of how to explore a range of digital medium such as, for example, video and sound. You will be required to apply the skills you develop to create pre-recorded and real-time performance work.
Weekly CalendarTBC
BibliographyDixon, S. (2007) Digital Performance: A History of New Media in Theatre, Dance, Performance Art and Installation. Cambridge: The MIT Press Dodds, S. (2004) Dance on Screen. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan. Giannachi, G. (2004) Virtual Theatres, Routledge Hill, L. (2001), Guerrilla Performance and Multimedia. London: Continuum International Publishing. Group Kaye, N. (2006) Multi-media: Video - Installation - Performance. Oxon: Routledge McPherson, K. (2006) Making Video Dance, A Step-by-Step Guide to Creating Dance for the Screen. Oxon: Routledge Mirzoeff, N. (1999) Visual Culture. London and New York: Routledge Mitoma, J. (2002) Envisioning Dance on Film and Video. London and New York: Routledge
AssessmentRequirement: you are asked to construct a screen based performance work. It should be in the region of two minutes, Work should be uploaded to You Tube (or similar) and posted onto the Facebook page ‘Dance and the Looking Glass’.

DA4015-20 - Performance Project 1

DepartmentDance
Module TitlePerformance Project 1
Module CodeDA4015-20SemesterOne
Study Hours22 contact/63 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionThis module provides you with an opportunity to develop your physical and interpretative skills in dance performance. A rigorous exploration into approaches to creative processes and performance will be a significant part of the module. In addition, the challenges of working collaboratively will be addressed. This module is only suitable for students with previous dance experience.
Weekly CalendarWeek 1: Introduction to Performance Skills 1/ Week 2: Introduction to Performance Skills 2/ Week 3: Introduction to Performance Skills 3/ Week 4 Introduction to Performance Skills 4/ Week 5: Introduction to Performance Skills 5/ Week 6: Performance Presentations: The Brief/ Week 7: Preparations for Performance Presentations/ Week 8 Preparations for Performance Presentations/Week 9: Preparations for Performance Presentations Week/10: Performance Presentations/ Week 11: Tutorials
BibliographyBannerman, C., Sofaer, J. & Watt, J. (2006) Navigating the Unknown. London: Middlesex University Press. Bial, H. 2004 The Performance Studies Reader. Oxon: Routledge. Contemporary Choreography: A Critical Reader. Oxon: Routledge pp.177-194. Butterworth, J. & Wildschut, L. (2009) Contemporary Choreography: A Critical Reader. Oxon: Routledge. Carter, A. (1998) The Routledge Dance Studies Reader. London, New York: Routledge. Campbell, P. (1996) Analysing Performance: A Critical Reader. Manchester: Manchester University Press. Counsell, C. and Wolf, L. (2001) Performance Analysis: An Introductory Coursebook. London: Routledge. Huxley, M. & Witts, N. 1996 The Twentieth Century Performance Reader. London: Routledge. Pavis, P. (2003) Analysing Performance: Theatre, Dance and Film. Michigan: Michigan University Press. Preston-Dunlop, V. (1998) Looking at Dances. London: Verve Publishing. Preston-Dunlop, V. and Sanchez-Colberg, A., (2002) Dance and the Performative. London: Verve Publishing. Schechner, R. (1988) Performance Theory. New York: Routledge. Schechner, R. (2006) Performance Studies: An Introduction. Oxon: Routledge. 41 Tufnell, M. & Crickmay, C. (2004). A Widening Field. Dance Books. London.
AssessmentFormative Assessment: Practical Work Review. Formative Assessment: Continual Practical Assessment

DA5011-40 - Creative Dance Practice 2

DepartmentDance
Module TitleCreative Dance Practice 2
Module CodeDA5011-40SemesterOne
Study Hours33 contact/142 independentCredits20
Module DescriptionThis module is concerned with explorations into the self as a conscious site for both choreography and performance. The transformation of ideas and the representation of experiences will be investigated through the exploration of a range of choreographic methodologies.
Weekly CalendarStrand A Introduction: What is Creativity? Imagination v Creation: Sofaer’s Little Books. Who, Where, How? Exploring Creative Characteristics and Conditions. Introduction to the Essay Titles. Just Do It! Exploring Gladwell’s Blink Theory. Seeds and Stepping Stones in the Transformation Process. Visiting Professional Artist. Earthfall Intensive. Creativity and Memory Group Task. RISE Workshop. Group Performances.
BibliographyBannerman, C., Sofaer, J. and Watt, J. (2006) Navigating the Unknown: The Creative Process in Contemporary Performing Arts. London: Middlesex University Press. Pointe, Vol.14 (Issue 2) Boden, M. (2004) 2nd ed The Creative Mind: Myths and Mechanisms. London: Routledge. Campbell, P. (1996) ed. Analysing Performance: A Critical Reader. Manchester. Manchester University Press. Climenhaga, R. (2008). Pina Bausch. London: Routledge. Climenhaga, R. (2012). The Pina Bausch Sourcebook: The making of Tanztheater. London: Routledge. Csikszentmihalyl, M. (1996) Creativity: Flow and The Psychology of Discovery and Invention. Harper Perennial: New York. European Dance Theater (Tanztheater); DVD. Partsch-Bergsohn, I. Hightstown, NJ: Princeton Book Co. Fernandes, C. (2002). Pina Bausch and the Wuppertal Theater: The aesthetics of repetition and transformation. Oxford: Peter Lang. Foster, S. (2011) Choreographing Empathy: Kinesthesia in Performance. Oxon: Routledge Jowitt, D. (2011) The Center of The World. In: Film Comment. Vol. 47 (Issue 6) Pope, R. (2005) Creativity: Theory, History, Practice. Oxon: Routledge. Richards, T. ( 1995). At work with Grotowski on physical actions. London: Routledge. Robinson, K. (2001) In: Robinson, K. Out of Our Minds: Learning to Be Creative. Chichester: Capstone. Roose-Evans, J. (1989). Experimental Theatre: from Stanislavsky to Peter Brook. London: Routledge. Runco, M. (2006) Creativity. Theories and Themes: Research, Development and Practice. London: Academic. Servos, N. (2008) Pina Bausch: Dance Theatre. Munich: K. Kieser. Schechner, R. (2002) Performance Studies: An Introduction. UK:Routledge. Servos, Norbert. (2008) Pina Bausch : Dance Theatre. K. Kieser and Tharp, T. (2003) The Creative Habit. New York: Simon and Schuster. Understanding Pina: The Legacy of Pina Bausch. (2010). DVD. Sullivan, K., Silver, H. New York, NY: Insight Media. Zaporah, R. (1995). Action Theatre: The improvisation of presence. Berkeley, CA: North Atlantic Books.
AssessmentFormative Assessment: Practical Work Review and Draft Essay Submission. Formative Assessment: Choreographic Task and Essay of 2000 words.

DA5012-20 - Dance and Performance Technique 2: Codified Technique (Level 2)

DepartmentDance
Module TitleDance and Performance Technique 2: Codified Technique (Level 2)
Module CodeDA5012-20SemesterOne
Study Hours22 contact/63 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionThis module focuses on the development of your codified practice to enable you to gain a more rigorous understanding of movement material. The module is concerned with the exploration of your body as a physical and thinking instrument. Your understanding of qualitative and dynamic content alongside the development of flexibility, strength and stamina is challenged through a focus on momentum and inertia as aspects of physical competence. The module will develop your ability to engage in a reflective approach to your working practice.
Weekly CalendarExplore the relationship between gravity and force. Develop the understanding of inherent body weight and its relation with muscular activity in space. Analyse the relationship between alignment of the spine, carriage of the head and length through the floor. Week 6: Mock Assessment: In this class you will get the first assessment which will be the source of your initial written feedback. Week 8: Written Feedback. (via Minerva) and Tutorial (if requested) November/December: Explore the nature and concept of skeletal release. Increase the pace of class to develop stamina. Analyse safe practice on elevation. Amalgamate a section of exercises to develop core strength. Week 11: Assessment
BibliographyFranklin, E. (1996) Dance Imagery for Technique and Performance. USA: Human Kinetics. Rowett, H.G.Q. (1990) Basic Anatomy & Physiology, England: Hazell Books. West, C. (1997) The Energy Source, London: Prion Books. Cunningham Dance Technique: 2 Intermediate Level. (1987) DVD. Cunningham, M., Caplan, E. New York, NY: Cunningham Dance Foundation. Emslie, M. (2009).
AssessmentPractical Assessment Week 11

DA5015-20 - Digital Performance Practice 2

DepartmentDance
Module TitleDigital Performance Practice 2
Module CodeDA5015-20SemesterOne
Study Hours22 contact/63 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionThis module is designed to investigate the possibilities of digital performance practice, with a particular emphasis on making performance work for the single screen. You will explore digital video as a medium for creative dance practice and will consider issues around the viewing of the body on screen in a historical and contemporary context. The creative element of this module will be supported by critical, contextual and analytical studies in order to help you develop as a reflective and analytical individual.
Weekly CalendarWEEK 1. Theory: Introduction to the module and its learning outcomes. Review of past work (including greenscreen). Discussion: ‘What’s a dance film anyway?’ A look back at early dance films and the relationship between Hollywood and dance. Practice: Generate motif for greenscreen training in week 2. Document with phones/cameras/tablets etc. Task for week 3: Film background material for Chroma key. WEEK 2. Practical/theory: Greenscreen training in TV studio A WEEK 3. Theory: Greenscreen editing with Premier Pro, Rich Wood. Part 1 of ‘A Different Way of Looking’. Composition – What’s in, and what’s not in, the frame. Practice: ‘Open, Close’, A Different Way of Looking workshop 1. Task: For week 5. Green screen edit. WEEK 4. Practice: A Different Way of Looking workshop 2. Stills project, Meet at Green Park station at 9.45am. WEEK 5. Theory: Review stills from week 4 and green screen edits. Practice: A Different Way of Looking workshop 3. The Looking Boxes. Task: For week 6. Edit material from workshop 3. WEEK 6. Theory: Review and critique short films from workshop 3. Setting of Practical Project 1. Risk assessments. Story Boarding. Examples of film proposal. Screening: Action sequences in mainstream cinema as choreographic practice. WEEK 7. Intensive week with Earthfall Dance Co. Performance Theo Clinkard ‘Chalk of Land and Tongue’ Venue WEEK 8. Theory: Formative assessment: proposals for Creative Project. Practice: Filming for practical Project 1. Performance: Alexander Whitley performance. University Theatre. Post show talk. WEEK 9. Practice: Filming for Creative Project. WEEK 10. Practice and Theory: Dancer as author. Re-balancing the dancer/camera operator relationship. WEEK 11. Practice: Edit and review of rough cuts for Creative Project.
BibliographyRosenberg, D. (2012) Key Texts Screendance : inscribing the ephemeral image [electronic resource] Oxford: OUP. Carroll, N. (1996) Theorizing The Moving Image. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Mitoma, J. (2003) Envisioning Dance on Film and Video. London: Routledge. McPherson, K. (2006) Making Dance Video. London: Routledge. McPherson, K. (2006) [Online] Available from: www.makingvideodance.com. Porter, J (2010) Dance with Camera. USA: University of Pennsylvania.
AssessmentA short screendance work between one and a half and two and a half minutes long.

DA6012-20 - Dance and Performance Technique 3: Codified Technique (Level 3)

DepartmentDance
Module TitleDance and Performance Technique 3: Codified Technique (Level 3)
Module CodeDA6012-20SemesterOne
Study Hours17 contact/68 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionThis module aims to prepare you for the expectations of the professional performance arena and for postgraduate study. It demands a refined, rigorous and personal investigation into movement material. The intention is for you to perform with increasing physical skill that is guided and informed by reflective analytical clarity and forethought. It will demand that you reflect on the sourcing of multiple and concurrent impulses prior to, and within, a movement or movement sequence. This class looks at the techniques of Cunningham, Limon, Graham and Release.
Weekly CalendarOctober/November Explore the relationship between gravity and force. Develop the understanding of inherent body weight and its relation with muscular activity in space. Analyse the relationship between alignment of the spine, carriage of the head and length through the floor. Week 6: Mock Assessment Class Week 8: Written Feedback. (via Minerva) and Tutorial (if requested) November/December Develop the nature and concept of skeletal release Increase the pace of class to develop stamina. Analyse safe practice on elevation. Amalgamate a section of exercises to develop core strength. Week 11: Assessment.
BibliographyBuckroyd, J. (2000) The Student Dancer: Emotional Aspects of the Teaching and Learning of Dance. London: Dancebooks. Caldwell, C. (2001) Dance and Dancers Injuries. London: Dance Books. Nettl-Fiol, R. (2011) Dance and the Alexander Technique: exploring the missing link. Urbana, [Ill.] : University of Illinois Press.
AssessmentPractical Assessment Week 11

DA6013-20 - Somatic Research

DepartmentDance
Module TitleSomatic Research
Module CodeDA6013-20SemesterOne
Study Hours17 contact/68 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionThis module is concerned with a critical investigation into somatic practices as a basis for body knowledge, skills and creativity. The course aims to promote a greater awareness of the body as a living, moving, creative entity. Development of the intelligence of the body, through the study of Eastern & Western somatic techniques will facilitate focus, freedom and ease of movement, promoting an increased anatomical and kinaesthetic understanding of the moving body, as well as tapping into new dimensions of creativity and performance.
Weekly CalendarWeek 1: Course Introduction. Somatic Education and dance. Developing Awareness: Thinking in direction./ Week 2: Whole Body Consciousness: Self Perception: developing proprioceptive, kinaesthetic & interoceptive sensitivity. Journal Writing./ Week 3: Body & Place: Inner & outer perceptions: Experiencing body & place through sensory receptors./ Week 4: Devising a question for somatic investigation. Explorations in core movement patterning & movement integration. Environmental Dances./ Week 5/6: Ways of Seeing: Investigating Dualistic and Phenomenological approaches to the body: body as object, body as subject. Body-mind integration - improvisations./ Week 7: Embodying Self-Awareness: Form & Flow: Explorations in core movement patterning, extending sensory perception & connection through touch & improvisation./ Week 8: Continual Practice Tutorials 1. An optional Shin Somatic weekend workshop in dance, bodywork and imagination./ Week 9: Internal and external perspectives on Presence. Self and others: being present and holding presence./ Week 10: Intensive. (No Somatic Class)/ Week 11: Presentation of essay title. Sharing of research questions, basic plan for discussion and key readings. Shin Somatics Bodywork & Contact Unwinding.
BibliographyAdler, J. (2002) Offering from the Conscious Body : The discipline of Authentic Movement. Rochester, Vermont: Inner Traditions. Cooper-Albright, Ann & Gere, David (Ed) (2003) Taken By Surprise : A dance improvisation reader. USA: Wesleyan University Press. Damasio, A. (2000) The Feeling of What Happens: body, emotion & the making of consciousness. London: Vintage Books. Fogel, Alan. (2013) Body Sense: The Science and Practice of Embodied Self-Awareness. New York, London: W.W. Norton & Company, Inc. Fraleigh, S. (2010) Butoh: Metamorphic Dance & Global Alchemy. US: University of Illinois Press. Gallagher, S. and Zahavi, D. (2008) The Phenomenological Mind: An introduction to philosophy of mind and cognitive science. London & New York: Routledge. Hartley, L. (2004) Somatic Psychology: Body, Mind and Meaning. London & Philadelphia: Whurr Publishers. Horton Fraleigh, S. (1996) 2nd Ed. Dance and the Lived Body: A Descriptive Aesthetic. USA: University of Pittsburgh Press. Johnson, D.H. (1995) Bone, Breath and Gesture, Practices of Embodiment. Berkeley: North Atlantic Books. Reeve, S. (2011) Nine Ways of Seeing a Body. UK: Triarchy Press. Journals: Contact Quarterly. Stark-Smith, N. (Ed). Northampton, USA. Journal of Dance & Somatic Practices. S.Whatley (Ed). Coventry: Intellect books. Performance Research. UK: Taylor & Francis Ltd. Routledge. Research in Dance Education. UK: Taylor & Francis Ltd. Routledge.
AssessmentFormative Assessments: 1. Practical Presentations 2. Reflective journal submissions Summative Assessments 1. Continual Practical Presentations 40% 2. Essay (2000 words) 40% 3. Written Reflection (1000 words) 20%

DA6015-20 Performance Project 3

DepartmentDance
Module TitlePerformance Project 3
Module CodeDA6015-20SemesterOne
Study Hours17 contact/68 independentCredits10
Module Description"This module provides you with the opportunity to work as part of a proto- professional dance company. It is designed to assist you in your transition from the university to a number of careers in the dance industry including performer, choreographer and teacher. The intention is for you to develop and refine your creative and performance skills and to accustom yourself to the demands and protocols of a professional working environment. This module is only suitable for experienced dancers."
Weekly Calendar https://docs.google.com/a/bathspa.ac.uk/document/d/1siDQyWAJwTUBt8aNEUxxiagHqUcyTSTxtG2jb2qjBu4/edit#heading=h.a4vgxl8dtard
BibliographyMeyer-Dinkgräfe, D. (2007) Consciousness, theatre, literature and the Arts. Newcastle upon Tyne : Cambridge Scholars. Shacklock, K. (2010) Dance Consciousness: An Investigation into the Nature and Development of Dance Consciousness in Choreography and Performance. Germany: Lambert Academic Publishing. Aggiss, L. and Cowie, B. ( 2006) Going Beyond into the Jars of Consciousness: A proposal for new practice. Please Additional reading/viewing . Anarchic Dance. London. Routledge Davies, S. 2004. Bird Song. [DVD] Davies, S. (2004) In Plain Clothes. [DVD] Forsythe, W. 2007. From a Classical Position. [DVD] Euphoria Films. Motionhouse. 2005. Perfect [DVD] London, Opus Arte/Royal Opera House. Vardimon, J. 2007.Justitia . (2009) [DVD] Kylian, J. (1995) Black and White Ballets [DVD] Germany, Arthaus. Netherlands Dance Theatre celebrates Jiri Kylian. 2004. [DVD] Germany, Arthaus Music. Rosas Shorts. 2007 [DVD] Editions a Voir. Rosas Fase. (2002) [DVD] Editions a Voir. Rosas. Rosas Danst Rosas. 1995 [DVD] Editions a Voir. Weightless (2007) Film. Dir; Erika Janunger.
Assessment1) Continual Practical Assessment 2) Performance Assessment

Semester 2

DA4012-20 - Dance and Performance Technique 1: Codified Technique (Level 1)

DepartmentDance
Module TitleDance and Performance Technique 1: Codified Technique (Level 1)
Module CodeDA4012-20SemesterTwo
Study Hours28 contact/80 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionThe aim of this module is to develop your skills and understanding of the body as an expressive and physical instrument. This class specifically addresses issues related to body awareness, physical dynamics and the development of flexibility, strength and stamina. You will become increasingly confident in your physical capabilities and potential through the investigation of codified movement vocabulary. You will be introduced to the principles of good working practice that will provide the basis for future learning and progress. The techniques of Cunningham, Limon, Graham and Release are incorporated into this class.
Weekly CalendarTBC
BibliographyBuckroyd, J. (2000) The Student Dancer: Emotional Aspects of the Teaching and Learning of Dance. London: Dancebooks. Stanton, E. (2011) Doing, re-doing and undoing: practice, repetition and critical evaluation as mechanisms for learning in a dance technique class laboratory. Theatre, Dance & Performance Training. Vol.2, (Issue 1): p86-98. [Online] http://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=weightless+erika+janunger&search_type=&aq=f
AssessmentPractical Assessment Week 23; Practical Assessment Week 28

DA5011-40 - Creative Dance Practice 2

DepartmentDance
Module TitleCreative Dance Practice 2
Module CodeDA5011-40SemesterTwo
Study Hours42 contact/180 independentCredits20
Module DescriptionIn Body as Site you will be encouraged to draw on personal experience and text as a source for making solo performance. The module will focus particularly on ‘self’ as, and within, process and performance, and the significance of the body as a site for the making and interpretation of autobiographical material (experience). Issues related to performance location and environment will be addressed through the relationship between you as creator and performer, the devising and performance of content, and spectator(s).
Weekly CalendarWeek 12: Text as Source/ Week 13: Text as Source/ Week 14: Choreographic De-construction/ Week 15: Choreographic De-construction/ Week 16: Breath as Source/ Week 17: Essay Lecture/ Week 18: READING WEEK/ Week 19: Practical Assessment/ Week 20: Stories/ Week 21:Stories/ Week 22:Breath as Source / Week 23: Essay Submission/ Week 24: Solos - Critique/ Week 25: Solos - Critique/ Week 26: Lighting and Staging / Solos - Critique/ Week 27:Lighting and Staging / Solos - Critique/ Week 28: Solo Assessment
BibliographyBrandt, A. (2013) Can You Learn Stage Presence? Pointe, Vol.14 (Issue 2): p62- 65. Climenhaga, R. (2008) Pina Bausch. London: Routledge. Climenhaga, R. (2012) The Pina Bausch Sourcebook: The making of Tanztheater. London: Routledge. European Dance Theater (Tanztheater): An overview of its past and present. (1997). DVD. Partsch-Bergsohn, I. Hightstown, NJ: Princeton Book Co. Fernandes, C. (2002). Pina Bausch and the Wuppertal Theater: The aesthetics of repetition and transformation. Oxford: Peter Lang. Richards, T. ( 1995) At work with Grotowski on physical actions. London: Routledge. Roose-Evans, J. (1989) Experimental Theatre: from Stanislavsky to Peter Brook. London: Routledge. Servos, N. (2008) Pina Bausch: Dance Theatre. Munich:K Kieser Verlag. Schechner, R. (2002) Performance Studies: An Introduction. UK: Routledge. Servos, N. (2008) Pina Bausch : Dance Theatre. Munich:K Kieser Verlag. K. Kieser Understanding Pina: The Legacy of Pina Bausch. (2010) [DVD]. Sullivan, K., Silver, H. (1995) NY: Insight Media. Zaporah, R. (1995) Action Theatre: The improvisation of presence. Berkeley. CA: North Atlantic Books.
AssessmentPractical Assessment 1; Essay; Practical Assessment 2

DA5012-20 - Dance and Performance Technique 2: Codified Technique (Level 2)

DepartmentDance
Module TitleDance and Performance Technique 2: Codified Technique (Level 2)
Module CodeDA5012-20SemesterTwo
Study Hours28 contact/80 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionThis module focuses on the development of your codified practice to enable you to gain a more rigorous understanding of movement material. The module is concerned with the exploration of your body as a physical and thinking instrument. Your understanding of qualitative and dynamic content alongside the development of flexibility, strength and stamina is challenged through a focus on momentum and inertia as aspects of physical competence. The module will develop your ability to engage in a reflective approach to your working practice.
Weekly CalendarJanuary / February Re-visit alignment as a source of healthy practice. Develop the understanding of momentum and inertia as an aspect of efficient movement practice. Raise the difficulty of the exercises to develop the student’s ability to quickly learn movement phrasing. Explore the balance between breath and stylistic performance. Develop fluidity of action. Week 17: Mock Assessment Week 18: Reading Week March/April: Introduce more complex falls. Introduce sequences of greater difficulty. Begin to develop the process of turning class- work into the structured presentation. Refine the assessment presentation with particular emphasis on precision, commitment and fluidity. Week 23: Assessment/ Easter Break: Written Feedback (via Minerva) In this term it is anticipated that you will be taught by a guest tutor and your final assessment will be based on the presentation of a sequence set rather than all aspects of the classwork. Week 28: Assessment Week 29: Written Feedback (via Minerva) and Tutorial (if requested).
BibliographySkinner Releasing Technique: Dancing From Within’. Journal of Dance & Somatic Practices. Vol.1 (Issue 2): p169-175. Howse, J. & McCormack, M. (2009). Anatomy, Dance Technique & Injury Prevention. London: Methuen Drama. [Online] Available from: http://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=weightless+erika+janunger&search_type=&aq=f
AssessmentPractical Assessment Week 23 & Practical Assessment Week 28

DA6012-20 - Dance and Performance Technique 3: Codified Technique (Level 3)

DepartmentDance
Module TitleDance and Performance Technique 3: Codified Technique (Level 3)
Module CodeDA6012-20SemesterTwo
Study Hours21 contact/87 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionThis module aims to prepare you for the expectations of the professional performance arena and for postgraduate study. It demands a refined, rigorous and personal investigation into movement material. The intention is for you to perform with increasing physical skill that is guided and informed by reflective analytical clarity and forethought. It will demand that you reflect on the sourcing of multiple and concurrent impulses prior to, and within, a movement or movement sequence. This class looks at the techniques of Cunningham, Limon, Graham and Release.
Weekly CalendarOctober/November Explore the relationship between gravity and force. Develop the understanding of inherent body weight and its relation with muscular activity in space. Analyse the relationship between alignment of the spine, carriage of the head and length through the floor. Week 6: Mock Assessment Class Week 8: Written Feedback. (via Minerva) and Tutorial (if requested) November/December Develop the nature and concept of skeletal release Increase the pace of class to develop stamina. Analyse safe practice on elevation. Amalgamate a section of exercises to develop core strength. Week 11: Assessment.
BibliographyBuckroyd, J. (2000) The Student Dancer: Emotional Aspects of the Teaching and Learning of Dance. London: Dancebooks. Caldwell, C. (2001) Dance and Dancers Injuries. London: Dance Books. Nettl-Fiol, R. (2011) Dance and the Alexander Technique: exploring the missing link. Urbana, [Ill.] : University of Illinois Press.
AssessmentPractical Assessment Week 11

Drama

Semester 1

DR4202-20 - Theatre History 1

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DepartmentDrama
Module TitleTheatre History 1
Module CodeDR4202-20SemesterOne
Study Hours22 contact/63 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionThis module surveys the history of the theatre and its allied industries. Simultaneously, it introduces students to undergraduate research techniques. Students establish an overview of the development of the traditions and movements that have shaped theatre and develop processes of investigation in preparation for later study.
Weekly CalendarIn the autumn term students look at Oedipus by Sophocles, Medea by Euripides, Greek old comedy and Roman comedy and medieval theatre.
BibliographyZarrilli, P. et al. (2010) Theatre Histories: An Introduction. 2nd Ed.. London: Routledge. Also selected play texts
AssessmentWritten Assignment/s (1500 words); Portfolio (group presentation + reflective journal)

DR6010-20 - Modern American Drama

DepartmentDrama
Module TitleModern American Drama
Module CodeDR6010-20SemesterOne
Study Hours17 contact/68 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionThis module explores some of the key milestones in twentieth century American drama and the way in which playwrights have explored the central questions of what it means to be an American. With a strong focus on plays and playwrights, the module will look at how leading playwrights have explored, challenged and celebrated the evolving debates around society, race, personal choice and cultural identity in America.
Weekly CalendarIn the autumn term students look at work by Odets, Hellman, Williams, Miller, Albee, Shepard, Mamet, Norman, Hansberry, Hwang and others as well as the American musical.
BibliographyBigsby, C. (2000) Modern American Drama. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Bigsby, C. ed. (1997) The Cambridge Companion to Arthur Miller. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Roudané, M.C. ed. (1997) The Cambridge Companion to Tennessee Williams. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Bottoms, S. ed.(2005) The Cambridge Companion to Edward Albee. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Lundskaer-Nielsen, M. (2007) Directors and the New Musical Drama. New York, London: Palgrave Macmillan. Savran, D. (1999) The Playwright’s Voice: American Dramatists on memory, Writing and the Politics of Culture. New York: Theatre Communications Group.
AssessmentWritten Assignment (1500 words); Portfolio (research and performance)

Semester 2

DR4202-20 - Theatre History

DepartmentDrama
Module TitleTheatre History 2
Module CodeDR4202-20SemesterOne
Study Hours22 contact/63 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionThis module surveys the history of the theatre and its allied industries. Simultaneously, it introduces students to undergraduate research techniques. Students establish an overview of the development of the traditions and movements that have shaped theatre and develop processes of investigation in preparation for later study.
Weekly CalendarIn the autumn term students look at Oedipus by Sophocles, Medea by Euripides, Greek old comedy and Roman comedy and medieval theatre.
BibliographyZarrilli, P. et al. (2010) Theatre Histories: An Introduction. 2nd Ed.. London: Routledge. Also selected play texts
AssessmentWritten Assignment/s (1500 words); Portfolio (group presentation + reflective journal)

Education

Semester 1

ED4001-40 - Education For Change

DepartmentEducation
Module TitleEducation for Change
Module CodeED4001-40SemesterOne
Study Hours44 contact/130 independentCredits20
Module DescriptionThis module provides an introduction to Education Studies, with a focus on the ways that education changes individuals and society. We all think we know about schools and education, perhaps because we have been through it, but how much do we really know and how far is our knowledge affected for better or worse by our personal experiences? By the end of this module you will have gained some knowledge of the diversity of in the UK education system and begun to understand some of the issues and challenges that educators need to grapple with. You will have also addressed such questions as ‘How do we learn?’, ‘How reliable is the knowledge we are learning?’, ‘What alternative visions do people have for education?’, ‘What does it mean to be an educated person?’
Weekly Calendar1. What is education for? 2. Education and change 3. Why what you know is wrong! Problematising education 4. Who are we teaching? Contested notions of childhood 5. What and where are we teaching? Contested notions of classroom and curricula 6. Directed study week 7. How do we learn? An introduction to theories of learning 8. Learning and teaching in the early years 9. Adult Learning 10. An 'ecological' view of learning 11. Assignment work
BibliographyThere is no single set textbook for this module. Set texts will be supplied electronically, with secondary reading listed and available either electronically or through the library.
Assessment1. Essay on a change in education, 50% 2. Essay on a research paper, 50%

ED4005-20 - Childhood Narratives

DepartmentEducation
Module TitleChildhood Narratives
Module CodeED4005-20SemesterOne
Study Hours22 contact/63 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionThis modules uses international examples of biographies and autobiographies as the basis for exploring notions of childhood. Students are required to review texts as well as engage in autobiographical writing.
Weekly Calendar1. Introduction to Narratives; 2. Film: frameworks for review; 3. Telling Stories; 4. Film: Innocent Voices; 5. Critical Reflection on Film; 5. Independent group review task; 7. Presentations; 8. Film: Rabbit Proof Fence; 9. Personal Critical Reflections; 10. Educating through film; 11. Short Film Discussion Forum
BibliographyBold, C. (2012) Using Narrative in Research. London: Sage. Aitken, S. (2009) Global Childhoods: Globalisation Development and Young People. London: Routledge. Andrews, M. (2008) Doing Narrative Research. London; Sage. Bathmaker, A. and Harnett, P eds. (2010) Exploring Learning, Identity and Power through Life History and Narrative Research, London: Routledge.
AssessmentAssignment 1: Autobiographical Writing (1,000 words) 40%; Assignment 2: Critical Reflection (1,500 words) 60%

ED4006-20 - Philosophy and Thinking in Schools

DepartmentEducation
Module TitlePhilosophy and Thinking in Schools
Module CodeED4006-20SemesterOne
Study Hours28 contact/ 72 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionPedagogy is a weekly Philosophy for Children session and is strongly interactive
Weekly Calendar1. Thursday 12-2/td>
BibliographyBoyum, S., 2004. Philosophical Experience in Childhood. Thinking, 17(3), pp.4–12. Brenifer, O., 2003. How to Avoid Children’s Questions. Thinking, 16(4), pp.29–32. Buenaseda-Saludo, M., 2003. Cultivating Social Imagination in the Community of Inquiry. Thinking, 16(3), pp.36–41. Butnor, A., 2004. Bringing P4C Into the Undergraduate Classroom. Thinking, 17(1/2), pp.65–68. Cane, M., 2003. Group Roles in Community of Inquiry. Thinking, 16(3), pp.12–16. Carter, F.-C., 2006. Developing Communities of Inquiry in the Secondary School Creative Arts Classroom. Thinking, 18(1), pp.40–46. Cassidy, C., 2004. Children: Animals or Persons? Thinking, 17(3), pp.13–16. Colbeck, J., 2003. Children Under Power: Philosophers as Children. Thinking, 16(4), pp.22–28. Collins, L., 2001. Philosophy for Children and Feminist Philosophy. Thinking, 15(4), pp.20–30. Coppens, S., 1999. Some Ideological Biases of the Philosophy for Children Curriculum: An Analysis of Mark and Social Inquiry. Thinking, 14(3), pp.25–32. Curren, R., 1996. In Their Best Interest? Thinking, 12(4), pp.44–45. Dunne, J., 1998. To Begin in Wonder: Children and Philosophy. Thinking, 14(2), pp.9–17. Fresquet, A. & Maciel, D., 1999. Some Reflections on Philosophy for Children from a Co-constructivist Perspective. Thinking, 14(3), pp.11–19. Friquegnon, M.-L.L., 1997. What is a child? Thinking, 13(1), pp.12–16. Garcia-moriyon, F., Rebollo, I. & Colom, R., 2003. Evaluating Philosophy for Children : A Meta-Analysis. Thinking, 17(4), pp.14–22. Gazzard, A., 1996. Philosophy for Children and the Discipline of Philosophy. Thinking, 12(4), pp.9–16. Gregory, M., 2002. Are Philosophy and Children Good for Each Other? Thinking, 16(2), pp.9–11. Guin, P., 2004. The Political & Social Ends of Philosophy. Thinking, 17(3), pp.41–47. Havas, K.G. & Hayas, K.G., 1997. Children and Philosophy. Thinking, 13(3), p.26. Hurtado, A. & Adam, A.H., 2006. Philosophy for Children in Teaching. Thinking, 18(2), pp.8–12. JO, S.-H., 2002. Imagination in Community of Inquiry. Thinking, 16(2), pp.39–43. John Niklasson, Ragnar Ohlsson, M.R. et al., 1996. Evaluating Philosophy for Children. Thinking, 12(4), pp.17–23. Junjie, L. (tr. A.C.A.J.Y., 2004. America’s Philosophy for Children Teaching Method and the Development of Children’s Character. Thinking, 17(1/2), pp.40–42. Juuso, H., 1999. Ancient Paideia and Philosophy for Children. Thinking, 14(4), pp.9–20 %! Anent Pade. Kennedy, D., 1998. Reconstructing Childhood. Thinking, 14(1), pp.29–37. Available at: http://www.jstor.org/stable/816470?origin=crossref. Kodrat’Ev, I.A., 1998. Philosophy and Philosophy for Children. Thinking, 13(4), pp.20–22. Kohan, W., 2002. Education, Philosophy And Childhood: The Need To Think An Encounter. Thinking, 16(1), pp.4–11. Kohan, W., 2004. Is it Possible to Think? A Response to Phillip Guin. Thinking, 17(3), pp.47–51. Kohan, W., 1999. What Can Philosophy and Children Offer Each Other? Thinking, 14(4). Laverty, M., 2002. Philosophy for Children and The Consolation of Philosophy? Thinking, 16(2), pp.14–17. Lee, J.-A.A., 2003. The Triadic Relationship in Thinking For Oneself. Thinking, 16(4), pp.13–21. Lipman, M., 1998. On Children’s Philosophical Style. Thinking, 14(2), pp.2–7. Lipman, M., 2002. Where To P4C? Thinking, 16(2), pp.12–13. Lukey, B., 2004. Rethinking Dialogue: Reflections on P4C with Autistic Children. Thinking, 17(1/2), pp.24–29. Lushyn, P. & Kennedy, D., 2000. The Psychodynamics of Community of Inquiry and Educational Reform: a Cross-Cultural Perspective. Thinking, 15(3), pp.9–16. Maktsuoka, C., 2004. Mindful habits & P4C: Cultivating Thinking & Problem-Solving in Children. Thinking, 17(1/2), pp.54–55. Margolis, A.A., 1998. The Philosophy for Children Program. Thinking, 13(4), pp.2–4. McRae, J., 2004. Scratching Beneath the Phenomena P4C as the Practice of Comparative Philosophy. Thinking, 17(1/2), pp.30–36. Murris, K., 2000. The Role of the Facilitator in Philosophical Inquiry. Thinking, 15(2), pp.40–46. Power, N.P., 1999. Meno Stottlemeier: Linking Socratic Methods with Socratic Contents. Thinking, 14(3), pp.20–23. Reed, R., 1998. Philosophy and Children: A Perspective on the UNESCO Meeting. Thinking, 14(1), pp.38–45. Reznitskaya, A., 2005. Empirical Research in Philosophy for Children: Limitations and New Directions. Thinking, 17(4), pp.4–13. Ronhuis, T. & Rondhuis, T., 2007. Philosophical Quality of Children’s Thinking Patterns. Thinking, 18(3), pp.16–22. RORTY, A.O., 2002. Socrates and Sophia Perform the Philosophic Turn. Thinking, 16(2), pp.18–24. Saenz, C.L. & Carmen Lopez Saenz, 2000. The Child, the School, and Philosophy: A Phenomenological Reflection. Thinking, 15(2), pp.34–39. Schertz, M., 2006. Empathy, Intersubjectivity, and the creation of the Relational Subject. Thinking, 18(1), pp.22–30. Scolnicov, S., 2000. The Problematic Community of Inquiry: The Socrates and Kant of Lipman and Dewey(FN1). Thinking, 15(3), pp.41–45. Shapiro, T., 2001. What is a Child? Thinking, 15(4), pp.4–15. SIGURDARDoTTIR, B., 2002. Imagination. Thinking, 16(2), pp.34–38. Trickey, S. & Topping, K.J., 2007. Collaborative Philosophical Enquiry for School Children: Participant Evaluation at Eleven Years. Thinking, 18(3), pp.23–34. Turgeon, W.C., 1998. Metaphysical Horizons of Philosophy for Children: A Survey of Recent Discussions Within the Philosophy for Children Community. Thinking, 14(2), pp.18–22. Velasco A., M. & Velasco, M., 2006. Some Challenges in Building a Community of Inquiry. Thinking, 18(2), pp.24–25. Wartenberg, T., 2007. Review: The Well of Being: Childhood Subjectivity and Education. Thinking, 18(3), pp.1–3. Yulina, N.S., 1998. Teaching People How to Reason: The Philosophical Strategy of Philosophy for Children. Thinking, 13(4), pp.8–19.
Assessment1. 2500 word seminar report on how experience has shaped understanding

ED4012-20 - Adolescence in a Changing World

DepartmentEducation
Module TitleAdolescence in a Changing World
Module CodeED4012-20SemesterOne
Study Hours28 contact/28 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionThe module will focus on adolescence as a phase of development and will include a cross-cultural element. Different attitudes and issues surrounding adolescence will be considered from around the world. The central aim of this module will be to develop an awareness of the biological, intellectual, social and emotional changes that occur during adolescence and how these changes affect behaviour. It will focus on three areas: developmental changes, inter-relationships such as peer pressure and parenting styles and school-based issues such as truanting and bullying. Transitions to adulthood will be considered from a cross-culture perspective. Theoretical underpinning related to each area will be an essential part of this module and you will be expected to relate theory to practice. In order to achieve this you will be expected to, either: a. arrange ​a​​ placement in an adolescent setting eg. Youth group, after-school club, sports club etc. with a view to investigating the theoretical aspects in relation to a practical situation or b​. Reflect upon your own adolescence and relate your experiences to theoretical models.
Weekly CalendarWeek 1: What is adolescence? 2. Biological changes; puberty 3. Stereotypes of adolescence; Assignment planning 4. Transitions from primary to secondary school 5. Adolescent learning; Cognitive development 6. Directed learning 7. Adolescent learning - dimensions of learning 8. Social and emotional development 9. Parenting 10. Peer pressure 11. Teaching adolescents 12. Bullying 13. Adolescent health 14. Stress & Anxiety
BibliographyHowe A. & Richards V. (eds) (2011) Bridging the Transition from primary to secondary school Abingdon: Routledge.; Santrock, J. (2010) Adolescence 13th ed. New York: McGraw-Hill.
AssessmentTimed essay 40% (2000 words)Presentation 60% (equivalent 3000 words)

ED5001-40 - Issues in Education

DepartmentEducation
Module TitleIssues in Education
Module CodeED5001-40SemesterOne
Study Hours33 contact/142 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionThis is the core module for Education Studies at level 5. The module will focus on developing your understanding of the nature of education introduced The key themes of the context of Education policy, aspects of inequality and policy problems and responses will form the context in which you will critically explore the role of government in education, the influence of globalisation on policy and the concept of power in relation to education.
Weekly CalendarIntroduction to the module: Policy and political pressure in education. Schooling in England: a changing landscape. The political economy of education: marketization and education as a commodity. Participation of young people in education post 16: NEETS and EETS. Theme 2: Aspects of inequality Issues of inequality: an introduction. Directed study week: Library workshops. Gender and sexual orientation. Diversity – ‘race’ and religion. Social class and classrooms. Theme 3: Policy problems and responses. Inclusion – how policy can respond to problems of inequality in education? Urban schools: engines of social mobility?
BibliographyCurtis, W. and Pettigrew, A. (2009) Learning in Contemporary Culture. London: Learning Matters.
AssessmentAssessment 2 Essay 2500 words

ED5002-20 - Values, Philosophy and Education

DepartmentEducation
Module TitleValues, Philosophy and Education
Module CodeED5002-20SemesterOne
Study Hours28 contact/80 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionThis module provides an introduction to key debates in philosophy of education with a particular focus on personal and institutional value systems in educational contexts. The module introduces a coherent framework enabling students to understand how philosophy differs from psychology. The module will enable you to actively develop your debating and arguing skills and apply them to topics of contemporary relevance in education today.
Weekly Calendar1-3. Debate workshops 4.Educational research 5. Educational research 6.What counts and what matters 7. Analytical Philosophy of Education 8. American pragmatism and education 9. Continental philosophy and education
BibliographyBailey, R. ( 2010) The philosophy of education : an introduction. London : Continuum. Bailey, R. (2010) The SAGE: handbook of philosophy of education. Los Angeles, Calif. ; London : SAGE. Blake, N. (2003) The Blackwell guide to the philosophy of education [electronic resource] Oxford : Blackwell. Pring, R. (2005) Philosophy of education : aims, theory, common sense and research [electronic resource] Richard Pring: London : Continuum.
AssessmentPresentation 2,500 words 

ED5003-20 - Understanding Classrooms

DepartmentEducation
Module TitleUnderstanding Classrooms
Module CodeED5003-20SemesterOne
Study Hours22 contact/63 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionThe module will ask you to examine a number ways of understanding schools and classrooms by examining the research about how teachers manage their classrooms and support learning and what influences them in making these choices. The module will also introduce you to a range of pedagogical skills that are needed by teachers and trainers. We examine the ways classrooms and schools have changed over time as well as how our understanding of them has developed through research.
Weekly Calendar1.Introduction to module/ 2. Theoretical influences on classroom layout / 3. Organising an inclusive classroom/ 4. Policy and practice in the use of the outdoor classroom/ 5. Curriculum historical development and definitions/ 6. Directed study week/ 7. Curriculum: Subjects and themes; knowledge and pupil experience/ 8. Curriculum and pedagogy; teachers roles/ 9. Historical overview of pupil identity and voice/ 10. Teenage voices/ 11. Current initiatives and policy on pupil voice.
BibliographyAlexander, R. ed. (2010) Children, Their World, Their Education. London: Routledge. Alexander, R. ed. (2010) The Cambridge Primary Review Research Surveys London: Routledge. Wyse, D. et al. (2013) Creating the Curriculum London: Routledge
AssessmentSeminar report

ED5014-20 - Supporting Learners with Additional Support Needs in School

DepartmentEducation
Module TitleSupporting Learners with Additional Support Needs in School
Module CodeED5014-20SemesterOne
Study HoursTBCCredits10
Module DescriptionThis module focuses on the inclusion of learners with additional educational needs in a range of education settings. Recent guidance and legislation suggests that more children and students with additional educational needs will be learning within mainstream education. As a result education professionals need to know more about organizing learning environments and working in teams. They also need to be familiar with the range of needs they might encounter in their professional practice, and the best ways to support learners with additional educational needs
Weekly Calendar22/63
BibliographyFrederickson N & Cline C (2009) Special Educational Needs Inclusion and Diversity, 2nd edition, Buckingham OUP, Nind M, Sheehy K, & Simmons K (2003) Inclusive Education: Learners and Learning Contexts, London Fulton
AssessmentAn essay reviewing the semester's programme

ED5017-20 - Sociology of Education

DepartmentEducation
Module TitleSociology of Education
Module CodeED5017-20SemesterOne
Study Hours22 contact/63 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionThis module will use a broadly sociological framework to address issues such as: the purpose of education, how decisions are made and how fair these arrangements are. In doing so, it will examine what is constituted as knowledge and how knowledge affects (and is affected by) society. It will explore the relationship between politics, economy and education and the often dissonant relationships that exist between different social groups and the education system. We will focus upon the link between politics and education policy, exploring how different political perspectives have affected education in different ways, such as the role of neoliberalism in changing the educational landscape. By critically examining these issues we can ensure that we act knowingly to create a system that is both reasonable and effective.
Weekly CalendarIntroduction to module; Axioms; Sociology; Social theory; Social justice; Power; Learning to Labour: class, gender and morality; Learning to Labour: overview of text Paul Willis and Marxism; Social shifts 1: From working class to precariat; Social shifts 2: Bourdieu and post structural society; Social shifts 3: Class and morality.
BibliographyHalsey, A. H. (1997) Education: Culture, Economy and Society. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Lauder, H. (2006) Education, Globalisation and Social Change. Oxford: Oxford University Press. McKenzie, J. (2001) Changing Education: a Sociology of Education Since 1944. London: Prentice Halls. Meighan, R. and Harber, C. (2007) A Sociology of Educating. 5th Ed. Continuum Ward, S. ed. (2004) Education Studies. London: Routledge.
AssessmentEssay: 2,500 words

ED6004-20 - International Perspectives of Early Years

DepartmentEducation
Module TitleInternational Perspectives of Early Years
Module CodeED6004-20SemesterOne
Study Hours17 contact/68 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionIn this module you will be introduced to a number of international early childhood pedagogies including Te Whariki, Reggio Emilia, and Nordic approaches amongst others, which have influenced practice in early childhood education and care. During the module you will identify and analyse similarities and distinctive qualities and their influences on current early years practice in England. In particular, you will examine the contested nature of childhood, and scrutinise political influences on Early Childhood policy and practice, including issues of citizenship and democracy in early education. Early Childhood Education globally will be explored from a socio-cultural and cultural-historical perspective.
Weekly CalendarHistorical, political, social and theoretical influences that underpin and inform approaches to the care and education of young people. Constructions of childhood. The Reggio Emilia experience. Nordic approaches. Emerging themes and tensions.
BibliographyBrooker, L. (2007) Changing the Landscape of early childhood. London: University of London. Moyles, J. (ed) (2007) Early Years Foundations: Meeting the Challenge. London: McGraw-Hill Education. Maidenhead. Cameron, C., Moss, P. (2011) ed. Social Pedagogy and Working with Children and Young People . London: Jessica Kingsley Publishers. Carr, M. (2001) Assessment in Early Childhood Settings. London: Learning Stories. Chapman, P., Clark, A and Moss, P. (2001) Listening to Young Children. The Mosaic approach. London: NCB and Joseph Rowntree Foundation. Dahlberg, G., Moss, P. (2005) Ethics and Politics in Early Childhood: Education. Abindon, Routledge and Falmer Dahlberg, G., Moss, P and Pence, A. (2007) (2nd edn) Beyond Quality in Early Education and Care. Oxon, Routledge Edwards, D., Gandini, L. and Forman, G. (1998) (2nd Edition) The Hundred Languages of Children. London: Ablex Publishing corporation. Einarsdottir, J. and Wagner, J. T (2006) Nordic Childhoods and Early Education: Philosophy, Research, Policy and Practice in Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden. Connecticut: Information Age Publishing. Jones, P. (2009) Rethinking Childhoods: Attitudes in contemporary society. London: Continuum. Nuttall, J. (2003) Weaving. Te Whariki: Aotearoa. New Zealand’s Early Childhood Curriculum Document in Theory and Practice. Wellington, New Zealand Council for Educational research. Pugh, G. and Duffy, B. (2009) Contemporary Issues in the Early Years 5th Ed. London:Sage. Pramling, S. I and Sheridan, S. (2004) Recent issues in Swedish Early Childhood Education International Journal of Early Childhood Vol 36, 1, 7-23 Rinaldi, C. In Dialogue with Reggio Emilia. Oxon: Routledge. Siegfriedsen, W. (2012) Understanding the Danish Forest School Approach .Abingdon: Fulton .
Assessment100% Critical analysis

ED6015-20 - Creativity, Learning and Information Technology

DepartmentEducation
Module TitleCreativity, Learning and Information Technology
Module CodeED6015-20SemesterOne
Study Hours17 contact/68 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionThis module will to enable you to investigate, both academically and practically, how new technologies can be used in learning and teaching in a wide variety of educational contexts from home to university. The second aim is to explore critically the concept of ‘creativity in education’ in relation to new technologies. The aims are brought together is an exploration of the potential for new technologies to be used both in enabling creativity and creative teaching. The first part of the module will focus on research and debates that connect ICT, creativity and learning.
Weekly CalendarTo be confirmed. The course will consist of 1hr lectures introducing issues and debates followed by a two hour workshop where digital technologies and pedagogies will be examined.
BibliographyBanaji, S. and Burn, A. (2010) The Rhetorics of Creativity: a Literature Review. 2nd Ed. Newcastle upon Tyne: Creativity Culture & Education. Buckingham, D. (2007) Beyond Technology: Children’s Learning in the Age of Digital Culture. London: Polity Press. Craft, A. (2011) Creativity and Educational Futures: Learning in a Digital Age. Stoke on Trent: Trentham. Lankshear, C. and Knobel, M. (2011) New Literacies: Everyday Practices and Social Learning. Third Ed. Maidenhead: OUP. Loveless, A. and Williamson, B. (2013) Learning Identities in a Digital Age: Rethinking Creativity, Education and Technology. London: Routledge. Robinson, K. (1999) All Our Futures: Creativity, Culture and Education. Sudbury: DfEE [Online] Available from: http://sirkenrobinson.com/pdf/allourfutures.pdf . Thomas, M. (Ed) Deconstructing Digital Natives. London: Routledge Ltd.
AssessmentYou are required to contribute to, and engage with, an on-line discussion on the topics of creativity and new technologies during phase the module You are required to make a number of thoughtful, critical and constructive contributions to the forum on at least five occasions to achieve a minimum pass. You are then required to submit a 1500 word summary of a chosen topic or thread that draws together your understanding of the relevant arguments, perspectives and evidence that has been developed within the forum discussion. The summary will demonstrate your ability to critique and evaluate the arguments that have been posted.

ED6028-20 - The Subject of Education

DepartmentEducation
Module TitleThe Subject of Education
Module CodeED6028-20SemesterOne
Study Hours28 contact/ 82 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionPhilosophy of education pedagogy exploring concepts of subjectivity, subjection and subjects.
Weekly Calendar1 & 2: Aristotle; 3. Kant; 4. Dewey 5. Independent study / 1-2-1 tutorial 6. MacIntyre 7. Foucault 8. Nietzsche 9. Rorty 10. Irigaray/Braidotti
BibliographyTBC
Assessment2500 word seminar report / term paper exploring philosophical issue in education

ED6117-20 - Leadership and Teamwork in Early Childhood

DepartmentEducation
Module TitleLeadership and Teamwork in Early Childhood
Module CodeED6117-20SemesterOne
Study Hours17 contact/68 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionThis module will involve students in identifying and understanding principles and theories of leadership as they apply to Early Childhood settings. Students will look at effective ways of leading a pedagogical team. There will be an emphasis on appropriate communication strategies, collaborative and reflective leadership, developing effective communities of learning and working with parents/carers, families and communities.
Weekly Calendar1. Qualities and skill of leaders of pedagogy 2. Ethical Leadership 3. Leadership styles 4. Teams 5. Developing others 6. Leading Change
BibliographyAubrey, C. (2011) Leading and Managing in the Early Years. 2nd Ed. London. London: Sage Publications. Bush,T. and Middlewood, D. (2005) Leading & Managing People in Education. London: Sage Publications. Dahlberg, G., Moss, P. and Pence, A. (2007) Beyond Quality in Early Childhood Education and Care: Languages of evaluation. 2nd Ed. London: Falmer Press. Dahlberg, G. Moss, P. and Pence, A. (2005) Ethics and Politics in Early Childhood Education. London: Routledge. Falmer, E. and Waniganayake, M. (2003) Early Childhood Professionals: Leading today and tomorrow. Elsevier: MacLennan & Petty. Goleman, B. (2002) Primal Leadership: Learning to Lead with Emotional Intelligence. Harvard: Harvard Business School Press. Hirst, K & and Nutbrown, C. (2005) Perspectives in Early Childhood Education: Contemporary Research. Stoke on Trent: Trentham Books. Pugh, G., Duffy, B, (2009) Contemporary Issues in the Early Years. 5th Ed. London: Sage. Rodd, J. (2013) Leadership in Early Childhood, Maidenhead: Oxford University Press.
Assessment100% Presentation

Semester 2

ED4001-40 - Education for Change

DepartmentEducation
Module TitleEducation for Change
Module CodeED4001-40SemesterTwo
Study Hours56 contact/166 independentCredits20
Module DescriptionThis module offers an introduction to Education Studies. In particular, you will focus on the role of education in society and its ability to challenge inequalities and promote social change. You will also explore education from an international perspective and will begin to develop skills as an educational researcher.
Weekly Calendar1. Inequality and social mobility 2. How is gender relevant to education? 3. How is ethnicity relevant to education? 4. Education and globalisation 5. Is education a force for peace or conflict? 6. Sustainability and citizenship 7. Presentation work 8. Presentation work 9. Introduction to education research 10. Aspiration, identity and education 11. Research ethics 12. Data analysis and writing up research
BibliographyThere is no single set textbook for this module. Set texts will be supplied electronically, with secondary reading listed and available either electronically or through the library.
Assessment1. Group presentation, 50% 2. Research report, 50%

ED4005-20 - Childhood Narratives 2

DepartmentEducation
Module TitleChildhood Narratives
Module CodeED4005-20SemesterTwo
Study Hours22 contact/63 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionThis modules uses international examples of biographies and autobiographies as the basis for exploring notions of childhood. Students are required to review texts as well as engage in autobiographical writing.
Weekly Calendar1. Introduction to Narratives; 2. Film: frameworks for review; 3. Telling Stories; 4. Film: Innocent Voices; 5. Critical Reflection on Film; 5. Independent group review task; 7. Presentations; 8. Film: Rabbit Proof Fence; 9. Personal Critical Reflections; 10. Educating through film; 11. Short Film Discussion Forum
BibliographyBold, C. (2012) Using Narrative in Research. London: Sage. Aitken, S. (2009) Global Childhoods: Globalisation Development and Young People. London: Routledge. Andrews, M. (2008) Doing Narrative Research. London; Sage. Bathmaker, A. and Harnett, P eds. (2010) Exploring Learning, Identity and Power through Life History and Narrative Research, London: Routledge.
AssessmentAssignment 1: Autobiographical Writing (1,000 words) 40%; Assignment 2: Critical Reflection (1,500 words) 60%

ED4006-20 - Philosophy and Thinking in Schools

DepartmentEducation
Module TitlePhilosophy and Thinking in Schools
Module CodeED4006-20SemesterTwo
Study Hours28 contact/80 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionThis module is about philosophy and critical thinking and how this type of thinking is analysed and evaluated. The community of inquiry is central to the process of inquiry and learning and it is together as a community that you will assess the quality of your and your peers’ work.
Weekly CalendarPhilosophical inquiry into educational concepts using Philosophy for Children pedagogy
BibliographyBoyum, S., 2004. Philosophical Experience in Childhood. Thinking, 17(3), pp.4–12. Brenifer, O., 2003. How to Avoid Children’s Questions. Thinking, 16(4), pp.29–32. Buenaseda-Saludo, M., 2003. Cultivating Social Imagination in the Community of Inquiry. Thinking, 16(3), pp.36–41. Butnor, A., 2004. Bringing P4C Into the Undergraduate Classroom. Thinking, 17(1/2), pp.65–68. Cane, M., 2003. Group Roles in Community of Inquiry. Thinking, 16(3), pp.12–16. Carter, F.-C., 2006. Developing Communities of Inquiry in the Secondary School Creative Arts Classroom. Thinking, 18(1), pp.40–46. Cassidy, C., 2004. Children: Animals or Persons? Thinking, 17(3), pp.13–16. Colbeck, J., 2003. Children Under Power: Philosophers as Children. Thinking, 16(4), pp.22–28. Collins, L., 2001. Philosophy for Children and Feminist Philosophy. Thinking, 15(4), pp.20–30. Coppens, S., 1999. Some Ideological Biases of the Philosophy for Children Curriculum: An Analysis of Mark and Social Inquiry. Thinking, 14(3), pp.25–32. Curren, R., 1996. In Their Best Interest? Thinking, 12(4), pp.44–45. Dunne, J., 1998. To Begin in Wonder: Children and Philosophy. Thinking, 14(2), pp.9–17. Fresquet, A. & Maciel, D., 1999. Some Reflections on Philosophy for Children from a Co-constructivist Perspective. Thinking, 14(3), pp.11–19. Friquegnon, M.-L.L., 1997. What is a child? Thinking, 13(1), pp.12–16. Garcia-moriyon, F., Rebollo, I. & Colom, R., 2003. Evaluating Philosophy for Children : A Meta-Analysis. Thinking, 17(4), pp.14–22. Gazzard, A., 1996. Philosophy for Children and the Discipline of Philosophy. Thinking, 12(4), pp.9–16. Gregory, M., 2002. Are Philosophy and Children Good for Each Other? Thinking, 16(2), pp.9–11. Guin, P., 2004. The Political & Social Ends of Philosophy. Thinking, 17(3), pp.41–47. Havas, K.G. & Hayas, K.G., 1997. Children and Philosophy. Thinking, 13(3), p.26. Hurtado, A. & Adam, A.H., 2006. Philosophy for Children in Teaching. Thinking, 18(2), pp.8–12. JO, S.-H., 2002. Imagination in Community of Inquiry. Thinking, 16(2), pp.39–43. John Niklasson, Ragnar Ohlsson, M.R. et al., 1996. Evaluating Philosophy for Children. Thinking, 12(4), pp.17–23. Junjie, L. (tr. A.C.A.J.Y., 2004. America’s Philosophy for Children Teaching Method and the Development of Children’s Character. Thinking, 17(1/2), pp.40–42. Juuso, H., 1999. Ancient Paideia and Philosophy for Children. Thinking, 14(4), pp.9–20 %! Anent Pade. Kennedy, D., 1998. Reconstructing Childhood. Thinking, 14(1), pp.29–37. Available at: http://www.jstor.org/stable/816470?origin=crossref. Kodrat’Ev, I.A., 1998. Philosophy and Philosophy for Children. Thinking, 13(4), pp.20–22. Kohan, W., 2002. Education, Philosophy And Childhood: The Need To Think An Encounter. Thinking, 16(1), pp.4–11. Kohan, W., 2004. Is it Possible to Think? A Response to Phillip Guin. Thinking, 17(3), pp.47–51. Kohan, W., 1999. What Can Philosophy and Children Offer Each Other? Thinking, 14(4). Laverty, M., 2002. Philosophy for Children and The Consolation of Philosophy? Thinking, 16(2), pp.14–17. Lee, J.-A.A., 2003. The Triadic Relationship in Thinking For Oneself. Thinking, 16(4), pp.13–21. Lipman, M., 1998. On Children’s Philosophical Style. Thinking, 14(2), pp.2–7. Lipman, M., 2002. Where To P4C? Thinking, 16(2), pp.12–13. Lukey, B., 2004. Rethinking Dialogue: Reflections on P4C with Autistic Children. Thinking, 17(1/2), pp.24–29. Lushyn, P. & Kennedy, D., 2000. The Psychodynamics of Community of Inquiry and Educational Reform: a Cross-Cultural Perspective. Thinking, 15(3), pp.9–16. Maktsuoka, C., 2004. Mindful habits & P4C: Cultivating Thinking & Problem-Solving in Children. Thinking, 17(1/2), pp.54–55. Margolis, A.A., 1998. The Philosophy for Children Program. Thinking, 13(4), pp.2–4. McRae, J., 2004. Scratching Beneath the Phenomena P4C as the Practice of Comparative Philosophy. Thinking, 17(1/2), pp.30–36. Murris, K., 2000. The Role of the Facilitator in Philosophical Inquiry. Thinking, 15(2), pp.40–46. Power, N.P., 1999. Meno Stottlemeier: Linking Socratic Methods with Socratic Contents. Thinking, 14(3), pp.20–23. Reed, R., 1998. Philosophy and Children: A Perspective on the UNESCO Meeting. Thinking, 14(1), pp.38–45. Reznitskaya, A., 2005. Empirical Research in Philosophy for Children: Limitations and New Directions. Thinking, 17(4), pp.4–13. Ronhuis, T. & Rondhuis, T., 2007. Philosophical Quality of Children’s Thinking Patterns. Thinking, 18(3), pp.16–22. RORTY, A.O., 2002. Socrates and Sophia Perform the Philosophic Turn. Thinking, 16(2), pp.18–24. Saenz, C.L. & Carmen Lopez Saenz, 2000. The Child, the School, and Philosophy: A Phenomenological Reflection. Thinking, 15(2), pp.34–39. Schertz, M., 2006. Empathy, Intersubjectivity, and the creation of the Relational Subject. Thinking, 18(1), pp.22–30. Scolnicov, S., 2000. The Problematic Community of Inquiry: The Socrates and Kant of Lipman and Dewey(FN1). Thinking, 15(3), pp.41–45. Shapiro, T., 2001. What is a Child? Thinking, 15(4), pp.4–15. SIGURDARDoTTIR, B., 2002. Imagination. Thinking, 16(2), pp.34–38. Trickey, S. & Topping, K.J., 2007. Collaborative Philosophical Enquiry for School Children: Participant Evaluation at Eleven Years. Thinking, 18(3), pp.23–34. Turgeon, W.C., 1998. Metaphysical Horizons of Philosophy for Children: A Survey of Recent Discussions Within the Philosophy for Children Community. Thinking, 14(2), pp.18–22. Velasco A., M. & Velasco, M., 2006. Some Challenges in Building a Community of Inquiry. Thinking, 18(2), pp.24–25. Wartenberg, T., 2007. Review: The Well of Being: Childhood Subjectivity and Education. Thinking, 18(3), pp.1–3. Yulina, N.S., 1998. Teaching People How to Reason: The Philosophical Strategy of Philosophy for Children. Thinking, 13(4), pp.8–19.
Assessment100% Seminar report on understanding of P4C, learning and wider education

ED5002-20 - Values, Philosophy and Education

DepartmentEducation
Module TitleValues, Philosophy and Education
Module CodeED5002-20SemesterTwo
Study Hours28 contact/80 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionThis module provides an introduction to key debates in philosophy of education with a particular focus on personal and institutional value systems in educational contexts. The module introduces a coherent framework enabling students to understand how philosophy differs from psychology. The module will enable you to actively develop your debating and arguing skills and apply them to topics of contemporary relevance in education today.
Weekly Calendar1-3. Debate workshops 4.Educational research 5. Educational research 6.What counts and what matters 7. Analytical Philosophy of Education 8. American pragmatism and education 9. Continental philosophy and education
BibliographyBailey, R. ( 2010) The philosophy of education : an introduction. London : Continuum. Bailey, R. (2010) The SAGE: handbook of philosophy of education. Los Angeles, Calif. ; London : SAGE. Blake, N. (2003) The Blackwell guide to the philosophy of education [electronic resource] Oxford : Blackwell. Pring, R. (2005) Philosophy of education : aims, theory, common sense and research [electronic resource] Richard Pring: London : Continuum.
AssessmentTBC

ED5027-20 - Growing Up and Living in Communities

DepartmentEducation
Module TitleGrowing Up and Living in Communities
Module CodeED5027-20SemesterTwo
Study Hours28 contact/80 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionIn this module students will learn about the various issues associated with young people's transitions to adulthood and how this is impacted by government policies, local services and political priorities. Students will also learn the ways in which organisations working with young people can develop citizenship, participation and empowerment.
Weekly Calendar1. Youth Transitions; 2. Housing; 3. Family Life; 4. Health; 5. Law & Order; 6. Presentations, 7. Reading Week; 8. Presentations; 9.Citizenship; 10. Participation; 11. Voice; 12. Representation; 13. Writing Funding Applications; 14. Tutorials
BibliographyRoche, J., Tucker, S.,Thomson, R. and Flynn, R. eds. (2004) Youth in Society. London: Sage. Twelvetrees, A. (2001) Community Work. 3rd Ed. London: Palgrave. Delanty, G. (2003) Community. Oxon: Routledge. Fitzsimmons, A., Hope, M., Cooper, C. and Russell, K. (2011) Empowerment & Participation in Youth Work. Exeter: Learning Matters
AssessmentCommunity Project Funding Application (2,500 words) 100%

English Literature

Semester 1

EN4003-20 - Scandal And Sobriety: From The Enlightenment to Victorianism, 1750-1890

DepartmentEnglish Literature
Module TitleScandal And Sobriety: From The Enlightenment to Victorianism, 1750-1890
Module CodeEN4003-20SemesterOne
Study Hours22 contact/63 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionThis module covers a range of important works by some well-known and less well-known writers from the mid- to late-18th century. Students will begin with the introductory unit ‘Enlightenment Expectations and Victorian Values’, and will complete also the eighteenth-century unit ‘A Scandalous Age?’ They will read in detail extracts from the poetry anthology, Sheridan’s The School for Scandal and Wollstonecraft’s Letters.
Weekly CalendarWe will focus on each set text in blocks of 3-4 weeks: Week 1 - Introduction; Weeks 2-4 - poetry anthology; Weeks 5-8 - Sheridan; Weeks 9-11 - Wollstonecraft.
BibliographyRichard Brinsley, R. (2008) The School for Scandal and Other Plays. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Lonsdale, R. ed. (1990) Eighteenth-Century Women Poets: An Oxford Anthology. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Wollstonecraft, M. (2009) Letters written in Sweden, Norway, and Denmark. Oxford: Oxford University Press,
Assessment1. Formative essay plan to be submitted at least THREE weeks in advance of the due date for summative assessment; 2. Essay (100% of mark) - 2500 word essay on a set topic.

EN4004-20 - From Decadence to the Naughties: 1890 -1958

DepartmentEnglish Literature
Module TitleFrom Decadence to the Naughties: 1890 -1958
Module CodeEN4004-20SemesterOne
Study Hours22 contact/63 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionThis module will introduce you to literature and criticism spanning the period 1890 to the 1930s with an emphasis on practical criticism and close reading. The module sets the texts within their historical context and examines in particular the issues of censorship and taboo.
Weekly CalendarWeeks 1-4: The Picture of Dorian Gray; weeks 5-7, The Waste Land; weeks 8-11, Poetry of the 1930s
BibliographyWilde, O. (2008)The Picture of Dorian Gray. Oxford: Oxford World's Classics. Eliot, T.S. (2002) The Waste Land and Other Poems, London: Faber and Faber. Skelton, R. ed. Poetry of the Thirties, London: Penguin.
AssessmentA comparative close reading essay of 2500 words total focussing on two different extracts from two different texts. You may choose extracts from Dorian Gray, The Waste Land or Poetry of the Thirties (1 extract = approx. 1 page of prose from Dorian Gray; approx. 30 lines of The Waste Land or an entire poem if under 50 lines from Poetry of the Thirties).Semester 2

EN5004-20 - Gothic Origins and Innovations

DepartmentEnglish Literature
Module TitleGothic Origins and Innovations
Module CodeEN5004-20SemesterOne
Study Hours22 contact/63 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionThis module explores the British Gothic tradition from its origins in eighteenth-century Graveyard Poetry to Mary Shelley's Frankenstein. Rather than attempt an historical survey, the module is divided thematically according to some of the central preoccupations of academic criticism of the genre. The topics covered in this term are: 'Origins of Gothic' and 'Female Gothic and its Detractors'.
Weekly CalendarStudents will begin with the introductory unit ‘Gothic Origins’ and will complete also Unit 2, ‘Female Gothic and its Detractors’. Students in Semester 1 will read three short works (the Graveyard Poetry, The Castle of Otranto and Vathek) and two longer pieces (The Italian and Frankenstein). They will be guided to one exemplar section of The Woman in White in Unit Two. The poetry, The Castle of Otranto and Vathek will be studied in weeks 1-4; The Italian, Frankenstein and the excerpt from The Woman in White will be studied between weeks 5 and 11.
BibliographyParisot, E. (2013) Graveyard Poetry. Newark: Ashgate; Walpole, H. (2014) The Castle of Otranto. Oxford UP; Radcliffe, A. (2008) The Italian. Oxford UP. Shelley, M. (2011) Frankenstein. Norton.
Assessment1. Formative essay plan to be submitted at least THREE weeks in advance of the due date for summative assessment; 2. Essay (100% of mark) - students will complete one 2500-word essay, using the questions from a list provided.

EN6002-20 - Shakespeare

DepartmentEnglish Literature
Module TitleShakespeare
Module CodeEN6002-20SemesterOne
Study Hours17 contact/68 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionThis module will engage with the most powerful literary phenomenon of the English-speaking world through an exploration of a range of Shakespearean plays from a variety of critical, historical and thematic angles. This section will cover Titus Andronicus, Richard III and Twelfth Night.
Weekly CalendarWeek 1: Lecture: Introducing Shakespeare/Seminar: Introduction Week 2: Seminar: Titus Andronicus Week 3: Lecture: Titus Andronicus/Seminar: Titus Andronicus Week 4: Seminar: Titus Andronicus Week 5: Lecture: Titus Andronicus/Seminar: Titus Andronicus Week 6: Independent Study week (work on web-based essays) Week 7: Lecture: Richard III/Seminar: Richard III Week 8: Seminar: Richard III Week 9: Lecture: Richard III/Seminar: Richard III Week 10: Seminar: Twelfth Night Week 11:Lecture: Twelfth Night/Seminar: Twelfth Night
BibliographyGreenblatt, Stephen et al ed. The Norton Shakespeare, 2nd edn. New York: W. W. Norton, 2008. Adamson, Sylvia et al ed. Reading Shakespeare’s Dramatic Language: A Guide. London: A & C Black, 2001.
Assessment1. Essay plan (formative assessment) - students will have the opportunity to discuss their work with their tutor during research essay tutorials in advance of the submission date; 2. Research Essay (100% of mark) - your essay must make detailed analysis of two of the plays studied. Essays should be 2,500 words in length and word-processed or type-written.

EN6020-20 - Twentieth Century European Literature

DepartmentEnglish Literature
Module TitleTwentieth Century European Literature
Module CodeEN6020-20SemesterOne
Study Hours17 contact/68 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionThis module covers the period immediately before the outbreak of the First World War to just before the beginning of the Second. The three texts are all shorter forms (short stories or novellas) analysed both in terms of the range of literary experiments and the shared cultural, political and philosophical themes of Modernism.
Weekly Calendar1: Introduction - 2: Workshop on translation - 3-5: Death in Venice - 6: Reading week - 7-9: Kafka short stories - 10-11: 'The Street of Crocodiles'
BibliographyMann, T., Death in Venice; Kafka, F. The Judgment; Kafka, F., The Metamorphosis. Schulz, B., The Street of Crocodiles
Assessment1. Essay plan (formative assessment) Students are required to submit a plan with evidence of further research on selected essay question, with tutorial in Week 9; 2. Essay (2,500 words; 100% of mark) Individual essay chosen from range of three questions on each set text, with option of designing own question in consultation with tutor.

Semester 2

EN4003-20 - Scandal And Sobriety: From The Enlightenment to Victorianism, 1750-1890

DepartmentEnglish Literature
Module TitleScandal And Sobriety: From The Enlightenment to Victorianism, 1750-1890
Module CodeEN4003-20SemesterTwo
Study Hours28 contact/80 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionThis module covers a range of important works by some well-known and less well-known writers from the 19th century. Students will study novels by Jane Austen and Thomas Hardy, and a satirical society play by Oscar Wilde. A number of important issues and developments in the period will be considered by students: these will include the role of women in society, the cult of the gentleman, the influence of the clergy, the relative positions of poor relations, servants and children, and the representation of urban and rural environments.
Weekly CalendarWe will focus on each set text in blocks of 3-4 weeks: Week 1 - Introduction; Weeks 2-4 - Austen; Weeks 5-8 - Hardy; Weeks 9-11 - Wilde.
BibliographyAusten, J. (2003) Mansfield Park. London: Penguin. Thomas Hardy, Tess of the d'Urbervilles. Oxford: Oxford World’s Classics, 2008. Oscar Wilde, The Importance of Being Earnest. London: Penguin, 1995.
Assessment1. Formative essay plan to be submitted at least THREE weeks in advance of the due date for summative assessment; 2. Essay (100% of mark) - 2500 word essay on a set topic.

EN4004-20 - From Decadence to the Naughties: 1959- the Present

DepartmentEnglish Literature
Module TitleFrom Decadence to the Naughties: 1959- the Present
Module CodeEN4004-20SemesterTwo
Study Hours28 contact/80 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionThis module will introduce you to literature and criticism spanning the period 1959 to 2009 with an emphasis on practical criticism and close reading. The module sets the texts within their historical context and examines in particular the issues of censorship and taboo.
Weekly CalendarWeeks 1-5: Rhinoceros and absurdism; weeks 6-8, The Passion of New Eve; weeks 9-11, England People Very Nice
BibliographyIonesco, E. (2000) Rhinoceros in Rhinoceros, The Chairs, The Lesson. London: Penguin. Carter, A. (1992) The Passion of New Eve. London: Virago. Bean, R. (2009) England People Very Nice, London: Oberon Books Ltd.
AssessmentYou will write a 2500 word essay on a question/title from a list provided. You must write about two of the texts.

EN5004-20 - Gothic Origins and Innovations

DepartmentEnglish Literature
Module TitleGothic Origins and Innovations
Module CodeEN5004-20SemesterTwo
Study Hours28 contact/80 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionThis module explores the British Gothic tradition from Wilkie Collins' The Woman in White to Stoker’s Dracula at the close of the nineteenth century. In this semester the two main topics are ‘Gothic, Religion and Secularity’ and ‘Gothic and Medicine’.
Weekly CalendarAn excerpt from Frankenstein will be studied in week 12. The Private Memoirs will be studied in weeks 15 and 16; The Woman in White will be studied between weeks 17 and 19, and In a Glass Darkly and Dracula between weeks 19 and 23.
BibliographyLe Fanu, J. (2007) In a Glass Darkly. Hertfordshire: Wordsworth Editions. Hogg, J. (1997)The Private Memoirs and Confessions of a Justified Sinner. Hertfordshire: Wordsworth Editions. Collins, W. (2011) The Woman in White. London: Penguin Classics. Stoker, B. (1993) Dracula. London: Wordsworth Editions.
Assessment1. Formative essay plan to be submitted at least THREE weeks in advance of the due date for summative assessment; 2. Essay (100% of mark) - students will complete one 2500-word essay, using the questions from a list provided.

EN6002-20 - Shakespeare

DepartmentEnglish Literature
Module TitleShakespeare
Module CodeEN6002-20SemesterTwo
Study Hours21 contact/87 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionThis module will engage with the most powerful literary phenomenon of the English-speaking world through an exploration of a range of Shakespearean plays from a variety of critical, historical and thematic angles. This section will cover Twelfth Night, Othello and The Tempest.
Weekly CalendarWeek 12: Seminar: Twelfth Night Week 13: Assessment Week 14: Independent Study Week 15: Lecture: Othello/Seminar: Othello Week 16: Seminar: Othello Week 17: Lecture: Othello/Seminar: Othello Week 18: Web-essay tutorials Week 19: Independent Study Week Week 20: Seminar: Othello Week 21: Lecture: The Tempest/Seminar: The Tempest Week 22: Seminar: The Tempest Week 23: Lecture: The Tempest/Seminar: The Tempest Week 24: Seminar: The Tempest Week 25: Research essay tutorials Week 26: Assessment Week 27: Assessment Week 28: Feedback tutorials
BibliographyGreenblatt, Stephen et al ed. The Norton Shakespeare, 2nd edn. New York: W. W. Norton, 2008. Adamson, Sylvia et al ed. Reading Shakespeare’s Dramatic Language: A Guide. London: A & C Black, 2001.
Assessment1. Essay plan (formative assessment) - students will have the opportunity to discuss their work with their tutor during research essay tutorials in advance of the submission date; 2. Research Essay (100% of mark) - your essay must make detailed analysis of two of the plays studied. Essays should be 2,500 words in length and word-processed or type-written.

EN6020-20 - Twentieth Century European Literature

DepartmentEnglish Literature
Module TitleTwentieth Century European Literature
Module CodeEN6020-20SemesterTwo
Study Hours21 contact/87 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionThis term focuses on three novels written and published after 1945. We will give particular attention to the ways in which these writers responded to the issues of memory, responsibility, guilt and silence in the context of deep ideological divisions between East and West by exploring the limits of language and the ambiguities of the first person narrative voice.
Weekly Calendar1: Introduction to post-war Europe - 2-4: The Unnamable - 5: IT training for assessment - 6: University reading week - 7-9: The Quest for Christa T. - 10-12: Too Loud a Solitude
BibliographyBeckett, S. The Unnamable; Wolf,C. The Quest for Christa T.; Hrabal, B. Too Loud a Solitude.
Assessment1. Web-based project plan (formative assessment) - students must submit a research proposal with evidence of preliminary secondary research, which will form focus of planning tutorials in Week 8; 2. Web-based project (2,500 words or equivalent, 100% of mark) - Students create a wiki project on one of the three authors studied, with the brief to introduce that writer to a new audience through the relevant novel studied on the module.

Film Studies

Semester 1

FL4001-40 - Introduction to Film

DepartmentFilm Studies
Module TitleIntroduction to Film
Module CodeFL4001-40SemesterOne
Study Hours44 contact/130 independentCredits20
Module DescriptionThis module encourages students to go beyond the ‘appreciation’ of film, introducing film studies as an academic discipline. It will enable students to consider how the medium can be understood through the
application of a wide range of critical/theoretical approaches. These approaches will include historical, film form and textual analysis, genre theory, gender studies, psychoanalytic models and more. The course also contains a range of 'study skills' sessions, which will help students acclimatise to film studies as an academic discipline. It is an ideas module, enabling students to study and enrich their understanding of
'film' in its broadest sense by engaging with a variety of critical perspectives.
Weekly CalendarThe approaches which students will engage with, apply, and critically evaluate will typically include: historical approaches; film form and textual analysis; genre theory; gender studies; psychoanalytic models; audience and reception studies; stardom; auteur theory; structuralism and semiotics; technologies; ‘national’ cinemas and globalisation.
BibliographyNelmes, J. ed. (2012) An Introduction to Film Studies. 5th Edition. London: Routledge.
AssessmentReviewing Film (a. Analysis of published review(s); b. Writing an original review. (2,500 words) 50% Textual Analysis Exercise (2,500 words) 50%

FL5001-40 - Film Theory and Criticism: Understanding Hollywood

DepartmentFilm Studies
Module TitleFilm Theory and Criticism: Understanding Hollywood
Module CodeFL5001-40SemesterOne
Study Hours33 contact/142 independentCredits20
Module DescriptionIn this semester, the module covers the history of Hollywood film from the Silent era to the Post-Classical period. It uses a combinations of formalist, structuralist, post structuralist and psychoanalytical approaches to the study of Hollywood films.
Weekly CalendarSilent Film; Classical Hollywood Film; Film Noir; Post Classical Hollywood; Psychoanalysis and Feminism.
BibliographyMaltby R. (2003), 2nd Edition, Hollywood Cinema. Oxford and New York: Blackwells
AssessmentResearch Essay (5000 words)

FL5014-20 - Key Movements in World Cinema

DepartmentFilm Studies
Module TitleKey Movements in World Cinema
Module CodeFL5014-20SemesterOne
Study Hours22 contact/63 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionThis module takes a detailed look at some of the key movements in international mainstream and art-house film outside Europe and the USA. The module will offer students an opportunity to study some of the most culturally significant and influential works of World Cinema.
Weekly CalendarJapanese cinema; Cinemas of China and Hong Kong; and Indian Cinema.
BibliographyCardullo, Bert. Out of Asia: the Films of Akira Kurosawa, Satyajit Ray, Abbas Kiarostami, and Zhang Yimou: Essays and Interviews, Cambridge Scholars, 2008
AssessmentEssay

Semester 2

FL4001-40 - Introduction to Film

DepartmentFilm Studies
Module TitleIntroduction to Film
Module CodeFL4001‐40SemesterTBC
Study Hours56 contact/166 independentCreditsTBC
Module DescriptionThis module encourages students to go beyond the ‘appreciation’ of film, introducing film studies as an academic discipline. It will enable students to consider how the medium can be understood through the application of a wide range of critical/theoretical approaches. These approaches will include historical, film form and textual analysis, genre theory, gender studies, psychoanalytic models and more. The course also contains a range of 'study skills' sessions, which will help students acclimatise to film studies as an academic discipline. It is an ideas module, enabling students to study and enrich their understanding of 'film' in its broadest sense by engaging with a variety of critical perspectives.
Weekly CalendarStudents will engage with and critically evaluate films using historical approaches; film form and textual analysis; genre theory; gender studies; psychoanalytic models; audience and reception studies; stardom; auteur theory; structuralism and semiotics.
BibliographyNelmes, J. ed. (2007) An Introduction to Film Studies. 4th Edition. London: Routledge
AssessmentReviewing Film, Textual Analysis

Food & Nutrition

Semester 1

BY4505-20 - Global Food Issues

DepartmentFood and Nutrition
Module TitleGlobal Food Issues
Module CodeBY4505-20SemesterOne
Study Hours22 contact/63 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionThe need for food is fundamental and its availability and provision is of paramount importance. The central theme of the module is the food supply chain – primary production, manufacturing, retail and consumption. The role of the consumer is particularly important, but so too are impacts of food production on natural and social environments, and the relationships between food and health. The module focuses on investigating animal and crop production; ethical, environmental and health concerns are discussed.
Weekly CalendarGlobal food demand; Socio-economic trends, Assignment briefing; Global food production 1 – Plant foods; Global food production 2 – Animal derived foods; Animal welfare; Food sustainability; Global food production; Food Security; Food production and the environment; Food Waste.
BibliographyOosterveer, P. and Sonnenfeld, D.A. (2012) Food, Globalization and Sustainability. London: Earthscan.
AssessmentReport Plan (20%), Report - negotiated topic on the effect of a current food issue on consumers (80%).

BY4506-20 - Food, Nutrition and Health

DepartmentFood and Nutrition
Module TitleFood, Nutrition and Health
Module CodeBY4506-20SemesterOne
Study Hours22 contact/63 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionThe module provides an introduction to food, nutrition and health. It includes an overview of the basic food constituents and their importance in a healthy diet. The module will deliver an introduction to the role of diet in a number of Western diseases alongside public health strategies to try and reduce their incidence.
Weekly CalendarMeasuring food intake; Psychology of food choice; History of Public Health; Public Health Nutrition Cycle; Public Health Nutrition Strategies; Nutrition policy; DRVs (include hydration); Carbohydrates; the Eatwell plate; Food portion sizes; Fats; Dietary Analysis (Netwisp); Proteins - Spectrophotometry and Biuret test; Vitamins and Minerals; Energy balance; Basic body composition measurements.
BibliographyAspden, W., Caple, F., Reed, R., Jones, A., Weyers, J. (2011) Practical Skills in Food Science, Nutrition and Dietetics. Harlow: Pearson. Campbell-Platt, G. (2009) Food Science and Technology. Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell. Hogg, S. (2013) Essential Microbiology. Chichester: John Wiley and Sons
AssessmentAssessment tutorial with tutor to discuss dietary analysis plan (20%) Dietary analysis (food diary) (80%)

Semester 2

BY4505-20 - Global Food Issues

DepartmentFood and Nutrition
Module TitleGlobal Food Issues
Module CodeBY4505-20SemesterTwo
Study Hours28 contact/80 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionThe need for food is fundamental and its availability and provision is of paramount importance. The central theme of the module is the food supply chain – primary production, manufacturing, retail and consumption. The role of the consumer is particularly important, but so too are impacts of food production on natural and social environments, and the relationships between food and health. The module focuses on the various processes that transform and transport raw materials into the variety of food products available in supermarkets today. Ethical, environmental and health concerns are also discussed.
Weekly CalendarFood production and the dilemma of genetic modification; Multinational food brands and corporations; Supermarkets and food retail; Food Safety and Food Law; Manufacture, added value and NPD; Food packaging; Food labelling; Assessment tutorials; Healthy eating campaigns; Global food and nutrition; trends; Food Aid; Future Food System.
BibliographyOosterveer, P. and Sonnenfeld, D.A. (2012) Food, Globalization and Sustainability. London: Earthscan
AssessmentEssay plan based on examination style question, to be reviewed in personal tutorial with module leader (20%). Seen Examination paper (80%)

BY4506-20 - Food, Nutrition and Health

DepartmentFood and Nutrition
Module TitleFood, Nutrition and Health
Module CodeBY4506-20SemesterTwo
Study Hours28 contact/80 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionThe module provides an introduction to food, nutrition and health. The module will familiarise you with the practical methods of food processing, food development and sensory analysis. The module also introduces you to the world of microorganisms in particular those related to food spoilage and the methods of prevention. You will gain practical experience of growing and observing these organisms and learn how man can manipulate bacterial growth for our own purposes. You will also develop a food product and test it for nutritional content, safety and consumer acceptability.
Weekly CalendarThe Food Supply Chain: An Overview; Designing and making food products; Isolation of bacteria; Growth and metabolism; Preservation techniques; Sensory evaluation of food products; Microbiological evaluation of food products; Developing smoothies; Food spoilage and preservation; Production of smoothies for sensory and microbiological evaluation; Food poisoning and food borne illness; Microbiological evaluation of smoothies; Microbes in industry; Chemical analysis of food products; Data analysis workshop and analysis of sensory evaluation; Lifecycle – maternal; Lifecycle – infant and child feeding; Lifecycle – elderly; Diet and Health – obesity – cancer – CHD – diabetes; Food allergy/intolerance.
BibliographyAspden, W., Caple, F., Reed, R., Jones, A. and Weyers, J. (2011) Practical Skills in Food Science, Nutrition and Dietetics. Harlow: Pearson. Campbell-Platt, G (2009). Food Science and Technology. Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell. Gibney, M.J., Lanham-New, S.A., Cassidy, A. and Vorster, H.H. (2009) Introduction to Human Nutrition. 2nd Ed. Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell. Hogg, S. (2013) Essential Microbiology. Chichester: John Wiley and Sons.
AssessmentAssessment tutorial with tutor to discuss laboratory report plan (20%). Laboratory report, based on smoothie production (80%)

Geography

Semester 1

GE4011-20 Global Development

DepartmentGeography
Module TitleGlobal Development
Module CodeGE4011-20SemesterOne
Study Hours22 contact/63 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionIt is likely that the Millennium Development Goal of halving world poverty will be achieved by 2015, with extreme poverty rates falling, mortality rates decreasing, and economic output in developing countries increasing. Yet around 20% of the world’s population still live on less than $1.25 a day, population growth rates remain high in developing regions, girls are still less likely to enrol in primary education, over 30 million people are living with HIV/AIDS, and annual emissions of carbon dioxide continue to increase (World Bank 2012). This module will help you to understand this global reality of poverty, development, and sustainability. In this module, theories of development will be placed into a geographical context, together with discussion of organisations of development such as the World Bank and NGOs.
Weekly CalendarThe curriculum will be drawn from topics such as: Defining development; Theories and models of development; Development organisations; Urban and rural development; Environment and poverty; Inequality and vulnerability; and Globalisation and resistance.
BibliographyPotter, R.B., Binns, T., Elliott, J.A. and Smith, D. (2008) Geographies of Development, 3rd edition. Harlow: Pearson Education. Schaaf, R. (2013) Development Organizations, London: Routledge. Williams, G., Meth, P., and Willis, K. (2009) Geographies of Developing Areas, London: Routledge. Willis, K. (2011) Theories and Practices of Development. 2nd Ed. London: Routledge.
AssessmentTBC

GE5105-20 - Global Cities

DepartmentGeography
Module TitleGlobal Cities
Module CodeGE5105-20SemesterOne
Study Hours22 contact/63 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionThe urban experience has defined modern society for well over a century. Rapid urban growth in the developing world means that over half the human race now lead urban lives and this poses extraordinary social, economic and environmental challenges. In this module, you will examine a range of different themes and case studies all highlighting contemporary global problems and opportunities. You will gather insights into and data about the differentiated social, cultural and economic experiences of city-dwellers around the world, insights thoroughly grounded in real life experiences and socio-economic data. Through a series of case studies, you will examine the often breath-taking inequalities experienced between - and within – cities in both the minority North (e.g. London, Paris, New York) and majority South (e.g. Mumbai, Johannesburg, Sao Paulo).
Weekly CalendarThe syllabus reflects the diverse and often contradictory nature of the contemporary urban experience and will include such themes as: wealth and inequality; gender relations; migration; social polarisation; environmental justice; economic change and decline; demographic trends.
BibliographyKey text: Brenner, N. &Keil, R. (2005) The Global Cities Reader, Abingdon: Routledge Other readings: Hall, T and Barrett, H (2012) Urban Geography (fourth edition), Abingdon: Routledge LeGates, RT and Stout, F (2007) The City Reader, Abingdon: Routledge Massey, D (2007) World City, Cambridge: Polity Press. We will also make extensive use of the downloadable resources available through the United Nations HABITAT programme – see http://www.unhabitat.org/
AssessmentStakeholder Briefing Paper (50%), Collaborative Exhibition (50%)

Semester 2

GE4011-20 - Global Development

DepartmentGeography
Module TitleGlobal Development
Module CodeGE4011-20SemesterTwo
Study Hours28 contact/80 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionIt is likely that the Millennium Development Goal of halving world poverty will be achieved by 2015, with extreme poverty rates falling, mortality rates decreasing, and economic output in developing countries increasing. Yet around 20% of the world’s population still live on less than $1.25 a day, population growth rates remain high in developing regions, girls are still less likely to enrol in primary education, over 30 million people are living with HIV/AIDS, and annual emissions of carbon dioxide continue to increase (World Bank 2012). This module will help you to understand this global reality of poverty, development, and sustainability. In this module the drivers of development and its impact, and issues of environmental resources and degradation, and urban and rural development will be examined.
Weekly CalendarThe curriculum will be drawn from topics such as: People and the development process; Development and disasters; Globalisation and resistance; Microfinance and development; and supported by case studies.
BibliographyPotter, R.B., Binns, T., Elliott, J.A. and Smith, D. (2008) Geographies of Development, 3rd edition. Harlow: Pearson Education. Schaaf, R. (2013) Development Organizations, London: Routledge. Williams, G., Meth, P., and Willis, K. (2009) Geographies of Developing Areas, London: Routledge. Willis, K. (2011) Theories and Practices of Development. 2nd Ed. London: Routledge.
AssessmentTBC

GE5019-20 - Environmental Hazards

DepartmentGeography
Module TitleEnvironmental Hazards
Module CodeGE5019-20SemesterTwo
Study Hours28 contact/80 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionEnvironmental hazards are a part of all our lives. Every day, someone, somewhere is impacted by a natural or technological disaster. This module will explore the processes driving these events, and investigate how society may best manage and mitigate their occurrence given they often cause death, injury, homelessness, displacement, destruction of infrastructure and economic impacts. We will provide you with knowledge of key concepts and the characteristics of a selected range of environmental hazards; with particular reference to recent examples and classic case studies, affecting communities in the global North and South. It develops a multi-disciplinary understanding of issues surrounding the perception of hazard and risk and explores a range of management approaches, including risk assessment methods.
Weekly CalendarThe syllabus will be in two parts (A & B), and typical content will include: Part A (Concepts, Processes and Impacts)- an introduction to the module and hazard types; discussion of ‘hazard’ and ‘risk’ concepts; mass movement hazards; atmospheric and hydrological hazards (especially flooding); tectonic hazards (e.g. earthquakes, volcanoes, and tsunami); technological hazards (e.g. industrial accident, dam burst). Part B (Hazard/ Risk Perception & Management)- hazard and risk perception; risk assessment; prediction; forecasting; mitigation and management strategies.
BibliographyKey Text: Smith, K. (2013) Environmental Hazards: Assessing Risk and Reducing Disaster, 6th Edition. Abingdon: Routledge Recommended Reading Blaikie, P., Cannon, T., Davis, I. & Wisner, B. (2004) At Risk: Natural Hazards, People’s Vulnerability and Disasters (2nded). London: Routledge Kapucu, N., Hawkins, C.V., Rivera, I. (2012) Disaster Resiliency: Interdisciplinary Perspectives. Abingdon: Routledge Lamond, J., Booth, C., Hammond, F., Proverbs, D. (2011) Flood Hazards: Impacts and Responses for the Built Environment. CRC Press. Lee, E.M. & Jones, D.K.C. (2004) Landslide Risk Assessment, London: ICE
AssessmentPoster (40%); Research Essay (60%)

GE5027-20 - Climate Change and Sustainability

DepartmentGeography
Module TitleClimate Change and Sustainability
Module CodeGE5027-20SemesterTwo
Study Hours28 contact/80 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionClimate change is the biggest challenge facing contemporary society, with a wide range of impacts occurring and predicted, demonstrating a clear need for more sustainable living. This module considers the natural and human-induced causes of climate change, explores the range of impacts, and discusses mitigation measures. A range of temporal and spatial scales will be used to explore these aspects, including discussion of longer-term processes of environmental change and the reconstruction of past climates using environmental proxies. The environmental and socio-economic impacts of more recent climate change will be considered using a range of global case studies, while individual, local, national and global strategies to mitigate the impacts will be identified and evaluated. Key concepts including vulnerability, resilience and adaptability will be considered to enable a more informed understanding of the consequences of climate change and the potential for a more sustainable way of life. In this way, the module investigates the science of climate change, and the impacts, responses and politics of climate change.
Weekly CalendarTopics will be drawn from the following: Climate change over geomorphological timescales: the Pleistocene glaciation; Reconstructing the past using environmental proxies; The science of human-induced climate change; Livelihoods and vulnerability within a context of climate change; Environmental and socio-economic impacts of climate change; and Strategies to address climate change and enhance sustainability from individual to global scale.
BibliographyBurroughs, W.J. (2007) Climate change: a Multidisciplinary Approach. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Dessler, A.E. and Parson, E.A. (2010) The Science and Politics of Climate Change, 2nd edition. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Houghton, J. (2009) Global Warming: the Complete Briefing. 4th Ed. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Peake, S. & Smith, J. (2009) Climate Change: From Science to Sustainability. Oxford: OUP. Pelling, M. (2010) Adaptation to Climate Change: from Resilience to Transformation. London: Routledge. Urry, J. (2011) Climate Change and Society. London: Polity Press.
AssessmentEssay (100%)

GE6013-20 - Coastal and River Management

DepartmentGeography
Module TitleCoastal and River Management
Module CodeGE6013-20SemesterTwo
Study Hours21 contact/87 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionThe management of river and coastal systems are important for environment and society. This module introduces a range of current problems facing rivers and coasts such as water resources, erosion and sedimentation, and dealing with the impacts of anthropogenic activities and climate change. Students will appraise environmental issues and problems facing rivers and coasts and, applying knowledge and understanding of environmental processes and systems, explore and critique options for remedies and management, and recommend solutions. Current policies, strategies and legislation, such as the EU Water Framework Directive (WFD) and Integrated Coastal Zone Management (ICZM), will be explored. Up-to-date technology and methods will be reviewed, as well as practical application using, for instance, remote sensing and GIS technologies.
Weekly CalendarChannel forms and system response to environmental change; Hard engineering applications; River rehabilitation and restoration; Managing channel erosion and sedimentation; Groundwater, low flows and droughts; Flood studies; Integrated catchment management and water resources; Digital modelling of catchments and runoff; Coastal habitats and conservation; Coastal policy and planning; Coastal management strategies, e.g. shoreline management plans; Integrated Coastal Zone Management; Managing climate change in coastal and river environments; Use of GIS in the management of coastal systems.
BibliographyBird, E. (2008) Coastal geomorphology: an Introduction. Chichester: Wiley. DEFRA http://ww2.defra.gov.uk/ Downs, P.W. and Gregory, K.J. (2004) River Channel Management. London: Arnold. Gordon, N.D., McMahon, T.A., Finlayson, B.L., Gippel, C.J. and Nathan, R.J. (2004) Stream Hydrology: an Introduction for Ecologists, 2nd edition. Chichester: Wiley. Masselink, G., Hughes, M.G. and Knight, J. (2011) An Introduction to Coastal Processes and Geomorphology, 2nd edition. London: Hodder Arnold. Thorne, C.R., Hey, R.D. and Newson, M.D. (eds.) (1997) Applied Fluvial Geomorphology for River Engineering and Management. Chichester: Wiley.
AssessmentPractical Report (50%), Research Essay (50%)

GE6027-20 Identities and Inequalities:  Past and Present

DepartmentGeography
Module TitleIdentities and Inequalities: Past and Present
Module CodeGE6027-20SemesterTwo
Study Hours21 contact/87 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionIn this module you will explore the construction and representation of social groups, and the places these groups inhabit,in both historical and contemporary settings. A key focus will be on the construction and representation of race and gender. The regulation of space, culture and social groups is studied through consideration of firstly, the power of representation, e.g. photographic, cartographic, literary forms and secondly, on the ground practises, e.g. legislation and control of population and territory. A range of case-study examples are considered from the colonisation and settlement of North America in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries to questioning whether slavery really has been abolished.
Weekly CalendarA range of key themes will be considered, such as: Geographical Imagination: Construction of overseas people and places; Cartography and power; Imagining and Mapping Empire; Defining colonialism, imperialism and postcolonialism; Mapping race and ethnicity: past and present; Links between race and gender and management of colonies; Role of women in the colonies; Slavery Past and Present; Representing ‘Natural’ Landscapes: e.g. ‘Wilderness’ ‘Tropics’; Exclusion of native groups from landscape; Postcolonial critiques of place and identity; Influence of colonial pasts on modern global cities; Contemporary citizenship education in the UK.
BibliographyDaniels, D., DeLyser, D. Entrikin J.N., Richardson D. (2011) Envisioning Landscapes, Making Worlds, Routledge. Harley, J. B., (2002)The New Nature Of Maps: Essays in the History of Cartography, Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press. McNeill, J.R. and Roe A. (2012) Global Environmental History: An Introductory Reader, Routledge. Morrissey, J., Strohmayer, U., Whelan, Y., Yeoh, B. (2014) Key Concepts in Historical Geography, Sage. Ryan, J. (1998) Picturing Empire: Photography and the Visualization of the British Empire, Chicago: University of Chicago Press. Sharp, J. (2009) Geographies of Postcolonialism, Sage. Schulten, S. (2012) Mapping the Nation: History and Cartography in Nineteenth-Century America, Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
AssessmentTBC

Heritage

Semester 1

MODULE

TODO

Semester 2

MODULE

TODO

History

Semester 1

HY4014-20 - The Georgians: People, Places and Arenas of Power in England, c.1714–1830

DepartmentHistory
Module TitleThe Georgians: People, Places and Arenas of Power in England, c.1714–1830
Module CodeHY4014-20SemesterOne
Study Hours22 contact/63 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionThis module will introduce you to a fascinating period of British history. It approaches the period through three interrelated categories —People, Places, and Arenas of Power — in order to provide you with a variety of different perspectives to the social, cultural and political history of England in the Georgian period.
Weekly CalendarWeek 1: Module Introduction Week 2: Georgian Britain: Setting the Scene Week 3: Bath: The Queen of Spas Week 4: To Reign or Rule? The Hanoverian Monarchy/Trip to Stourhead Week 5: An Aristocratic Century Week 6: The Middling Sort Week 7: A Polite and Commercial People Week 8: The Labouring Sort/Student Seminar: What can we learn about the Georgians from the Old Poor Law (1662)? Student Seminar: What can we learn about the Georgians from the New Poor Law (1834)? Week 9: An Ungovernable People? Week 10: The Country Week 11: Assessment
BibliographyBlack, J. Eighteenth-Century Britain, 1688–1783, 2nd edn (2008). Langford, P. Eighteenth-Century Britain: A Very Short Introduction (2000).
AssessmentResearch Project (3,000 words)

HY6014-20 - People in a Landscape: Town and Country in Early Modern England

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DepartmentHistory
Module TitlePeople in a Landscape: Town and Country in Early Modern England
Module CodeHY6014-20SemesterOne
Study Hours17 contact/68 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionA module for students interested in the study of individuals, families and the places in which they lived and worked in England (c.1700–1850). This module concentrates on the lived experience and material culture of women, men and children in England, both as a means of exploring an influential period of English history and as a way of throwing light on the changing experience of rural and urban families and households over time.
Weekly CalendarIntroduction: People & Place, 1700–1850; England and Europe: The Grand Tour 18C; Grand Tourists: Ideas and Artefacts; Bringing the Grand Tour Home; Proposed Field Trip to Stourhead; Stourhead Workshop; Politics, Power & Society in the Countryside: The Great Houses; The Country House: The 18C Country House; Tour of Newton Park; The Country House in the 19C; Reading Week: Project Due Proposed Field Trip to Attingham Park; The Long Weekend: Workshop.
BibliographyD. Arnold, The Georgian Country House: Architecture Landscape and Society (1998) R. Baird, Mistress of the House, (2003) J.V. Beckett, The Aristocracy in England, 1660-1914 (1986)
AssessmentResearch Project (3,000 words)

HY5010-20 - Peace and Prosperity; Depression and War: Britain and the USA 1914-45

DepartmentHistory
Module TitlePeace and Prosperity; Depression and War: Britain and the USA 1914-45
Module CodeHY5010-20SemesterOne
Study Hours22 contact/63 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionThis module compares and contrasts the experience of the peoples of the UK and the US in the inter-war years. It considers the great social, economic and political changes of the period, from the advent of mass democracy, the changing economic fortunes of the period, and the events leading to the outbreak of the Second World War.
Weekly CalendarTBC
BibliographyMartin Pugh, ‘We Danced All Night’ A Social History of Britain Between the Wars (2008). Colin Gordon, Major Problems in American History. 1920-1945 (1999)
AssessmentPresentation; commentary

HY5025-20 Ships, Slaves and Sugar: Britain and France in the Atlantic Trade, 16th-19th Century

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DepartmentHistory
Module TitleShips, Slaves and Sugar: Britain and France in the Atlantic Trade, 16th-19th Century
Module CodeHY5025-20SemesterOne
Study Hours22 contact/63 independentCredits

10

Module DescriptionThe module will place the history of the transatlantic slave trade within the broader history of the Atlantic world in the 16th century. It will therefore explore the political, social and economic causes that prompted a few European kingdoms such as Spain, Portugal and the United Provinces (the Netherlands) to roam the Atlantic ocean in search of gold and other commodities.
Weekly CalendarTBC
BibliographyJennings, Lawrence C. (2002) Women and Slavery in the French Antilles, 1635–1848. Cambridge, Cambridge University Press. Morgan, Phillip D. (ed) 2012. Maritime Slavery. Abingdon, Routledge.
Palmie, Stephan and Francisco A. Scarano (eds), 2011. The Caribbean: A History of the Region and its Peoples. Chicago: University of Chicago Press..
AssessmentEssay, presentation

Semester 2

HY4010-20 - Tudors and Stuarts: A Social History

DepartmentHistory
Module TitleTudors and Stuarts: A Social History
Module CodeHY4010-20SemesterTwo
Study Hours28 contact/80 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionThis module explores the everyday lives of men and women in early modern England: their attitudes and beliefs, their understanding of the world around them, the nature of family and social life. It sets the exploration of daily life against the background of broad economic, social and political change, and considers the relationship between the two.
Weekly CalendarWeek 12 – Gender Week 13 - Courtship and Marriage Week 14 - Conception and Childbirth Week 15 – Children, Education and literacy Week 16 – Sexuality Week 17 - Death and Dying Reading week Section 3: Popular Politics Week 18 – Participation, Petition, protest and riot Week 19 - Tutorials – Essay feedback Week 20 – Rebellion Week 21 – News and rumour Section 4: Cultures and mentalities Week 22 - Witchcraft, magic and science Week 23 – Custom, memory and the popular sense of the past
BibliographyWrightson, K. Earthly Necessities: Economic Lives in Early Modern Britain (London, 2002) Wrightson, K. English Society, 1580-1680 (Abingdon, 1982)
AssessmentOne group seminar presentation (1,000 words, one in-class documentary exercise (1,250 words)

HY5025-20 - Ships, Slaves and Sugar: Britain and France in the Atlantic Trade, 16th-19th Century

DepartmentHistory
Module TitleShips, Slaves and Sugar: Britain and France in the Atlantic Trade, 16th-19th Century
Module CodeHY5025-20SemesterTwo
Study Hours28 contact/80 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionThe focus here is on the British and French race for wealth, mainly gold, then slaves in Africa and sugar in the Caribbean. The background, motivations, imperatives of merchants and captains from cities of London and Nantes will be analysed. The study will then focus on the African continent and look into slave societies before and after the arrival of Europeans. Trade routes, cultures and religion in Africa will also be analysed.
Weekly Calendar1: Bristol and Slavery 2. Tutorials for TCA 3: Lecture: Scotland and Slavery Documentary and questions 4: Maritime Slavery, New Perspectives: Herbert S. Klein and Philip D. Morgan 5. Lecture: Maroon communities in the Americas Introduction and conclusion ‘What's in a Name? Mixed-Race Families and Resistance to Racial Codification in Eighteenth-Century France’ + Discussion 6. Wales and Slavery + documentary + questions 7: Documentary: Britain and sugar (Beckford family): Questions and discussion 8 Essay Q&A Slavery, Civil War and resistance in North America 9. Slave revolts in the Caribbean 10. Masters and Slaves Telling the Story: Diaries and Narratives 12 Years a Slave (Film analysis) - Mary Prince, a female perspectives on slavery or was it really? Group for debate following week – Prepare 11. Abolition: Debates and Petitions – Which side are you? Debate: Planters, Merchants vs anti-slavery campaigners (in Parliament- Religious groups – Women)
BibliographyWalvin, J. Black Ivory Second Edition: Slavery in the British Empire ( Penguin, 2001) James, C. The Black Jacobins: Toussaint L'ouverture and the San Domingo Revolution
AssessmentResearch Project (3,000 words)

HY6005-20 - Public History, Cultural Heritage and Global Politics

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DepartmentHistory
Module TitlePublic History, Cultural Heritage and Global Politics
Module CodeHY6005-20SemesterTwo
Study Hours21 contact/87 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionThis module explores our uses of the past in the present. We will be looking at history and the emergence of post-colonial nations, the targeting of heritage sites, libraries and archives as an instrument of war, and the part played by history and heritage in rebuilding communities. We will also be revisiting ideas about 'public history', and trying to refine our definitions and understanding of the concept. This module has been designed to encourage historians to think differently, but it is also relevant across a wide range of disciplines, and should appeal to anyone who wants to develop their thinking about the shaping of the contemporary world.
Weekly CalendarWeek 13: Student-led seminar: Presenting the past/Stories, formats, audiences Week 14: Tutorials Week 15: Heritage and the Nation/Colonial and post-colonial history Week 16: Caught in the crossfire: Heritage at war/Target, victim, rallying point Week 17: Sites of memory/Places and their resonance Week 18: Research project: assignment workshop Week 19: Reading Week Week 20: Heritage and reconciliation/War is over? Week 21: Research seminar/ Individual presentations: formative assessment Week 22: A green and pleasant land?/The ‘natural’ environment as heritage: challenges and confrontations Week 23: Public history revisited: a critical appraisal /Our ideas and impressions Week 24: Research project tutorials/Individual appointments if required.
BibliographyWe use a range of sources, mainly online, and the reading list changes to reflect current events.
AssessmentFormative assessment: research project presentation; summative assessment: research project report (3000 words)

HY6024-20 - Secret Service: British Intelligence and Espionage 1900-2000

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DepartmentHistory
Module TitleSecret Service: British Intelligence and Espionage 1900-2000
Module CodeHY6024-20SemesterTwo
Study Hours21 contact/87 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionThis course deals with the 20th century history of British intelligence and espionage activities, techniques, literature and personalities from the Great War to 2000.
Weekly Calendar1) MI5 in the Great War I/Early days at MI5 2) MI5 in the Great War II/Protecting the realm in the Great War 3) The Red Menace at Home: MI5, Special Branch and the Communist threat at home/Maxwell Knight infiltrates the CPGB with Miss X 4) Tutorials 5) 1930s and the road to war/ The Venlo incident -November 1939 Captain Sigismund Payne Best and R H Stevens get caught 6) Wartime espionage/ Formative literature reading groups created 7) SOE/MI6: Setting Europe Ablaze/SOE recruits women while MI6 argues 8) The Cambridge Spies: Philby, Burgess, Maclean and Blunt/Philby et al try to betray everyone 9) Reading Week 10) Heroes: Ian Fleming, ‘Goldfinger’ and other works/Post WW2 Secret Service reforms and James Bond 11) Villains: Ian Fleming, ‘Goldfinger’ and other works/Bond vs. the villains
BibliographyJeffery, K. MI6: The History of the Secret Intelligence Service 1909-1949 (Bloomsbury, 2011) Andrew, C. The Defence of the Realm: the Authorised History of MI5 (Penguin, 2010).
AssessmentResearch project 3000 words

HY4003-20 - The Age of Empires

DepartmentHistory
Module TitleThe Age of Empires
Module CodeHY4003-20SemesterTwo
Study Hours21 contact/87 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionThe focus here is on the rise of the British empire in America and later India, ending with the Indian rebellion in 1857 and its social, cultural, racial and political implications for future imperial ventures. An epilogue, in the form of a case study exploring the drive towards confederation in Canada in 1867 completes the module, revealing yet another dimension of British imperial maturity and rule in the mid-19C.
Weekly CalendarTBC
BibliographyPaul Kléber Monod, , Imperial Island: A History of Britain and its Empire, 1660–1837 (2009). Sarah Stockwell (ed.), The British Empire: Themes and Perspectives (2008).
AssessmentDocument analysis; special assignment

HY5010-20 - Peace and Prosperity; Depression and War: Britain and the USA 1914-46

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DepartmentHistory
Module TitlePeace and Prosperity; Depression and War: Britain and the USA 1914-46
Module CodeHY5010-20SemesterTwo
Study Hours28 contact/80 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionThis module investigates the impact of economic depression and the shifts in domestic politics and society in the years leading up to the outbreak of the Second World War, viewed from both sides of the Atlantic. It also provides an opportunity to consider the nature of the 'home front' in both the UK and the US from 1939, and the conduct of the War from these different perspectives..
Weekly CalendarTBC
BibliographyMartin Pugh, ‘We Danced All Night’ A Social History of Britain Between the Wars (2008). Colin Gordon, Major Problems in American History. 1920-1945 (1999).
AssessmentCommentary; special research project

Media & Communications

Semester 1

MC4010-40 - Media Today

DepartmentMedia and Communications
Module TitleMedia Today
Module CodeMC4010-40SemesterOne
Study HoursTBCCredits20
Module DescriptionMedia Today will develop your knowledge of the media and creative industries, introduce you to a range of key debates, which underpin the study of media communications, and encourage you to explore your understanding through the production of original media texts. The module will look at all areas of media communication, but with an emphasis on contemporary media cultures and media futures.
Weekly CalendarBlock 1 focuses on approaches to media studies and analysis. Here, you will concentrate on key debates in contemporary media and cultural studies and engage with specific studies, investigating their findings and methodologies.
BibliographyBurton, G. (2005) Media and Society: Critical Perspectives Maidenhead: Open University Press, Devereux, E. (2007) Understanding the Media, 2nd ed. London: Sage.
AssessmentCritical Commentaries/ Essay

MC5004-20 - Television, Representation and Gender

DepartmentMedia and Communications
Module TitleTelevision, Representation and Gender
Module CodeMC5004-20SemesterOne
Study Hours22 contact/63 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionTelevision, Representation and Gender aims to provide you with the opportunity to study the key debates surrounding the representation of gender on the small screen. The syllabus will begin by identifying a range of dominant gender roles and sex role stereotypes as they appear in contemporary popular programming, and ask you to consider the ways in which they can be understood in relation to wider debates about feminism, femininity and the much touted crisis of masculinity. It will go on to explore the representation of girl power in children’s animation before looking at critical writing on the portrayal of sex, romance, domesticity and cosmetic surgery on television. The module will conclude by investigating depictions of male friendship, sporting masculinity and fatherhood in television texts. Television, Representation and Gender will identify a range of debates and encourage you to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of such literature in relation to a range of contemporary popular texts. The assessments will test your ability to analyse extant literature in the field, your skills in applying such work to relevant television texts and your capacity to communicate your ideas effectively in a range of written and verbal formats.
Weekly Calendar•Television, gender and society •Brains, beauty and girl power •Sex, romance and the single girl •Marriage, motherhood and domesticity •Ineffectual and absent fathers •Intimacy, camaraderie and male bonding •Fashion, ornamentation and transformation •News, gender and power •Aggression, brutality and sporting masculinity
BibliographyBrunsdon, Charlotte and Spigel, Lynn (eds) (2007) Feminist Television Criticism – Second Edition. Maidenhead: Open University Press Feasey, Rebecca (2008) Masculinity and Popular Television, Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press Lotz, Amanda (2014) Cable Guys: Television and Masculinities in the 21st Century, New York: New York University Press Burrill, Derek (2014) The Other Guy: Media Masculinity within the Margins, London: PeterLang.
Assessment2500 word essay (50%) F-Word Feature article (50%)

MC6005-20 - Wired Up: Computer and Videogames

DepartmentMedia and Communications
Module TitleWired Up: Computer and Videogames
Module CodeMC6005-20SemesterOne
Study Hours17 contact/68 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionThe module aims to provide opportunities to draw upon and critique your personal experiences of computers and videogames; explore the industry and its products; encourage first-hand participation and engagement with the object of study so as to further the application of critical theoretical perspectives; equip you with an empirical grounding often lacking in extant approaches to the study of computer and videogames; and enable you write critically about videogames for a variety of audiences.
Weekly CalendarThis semester deals with definitional issues and explores the complexities and contours of ‘videogame’, ‘video game’, ‘interactive narrative’ and ‘computer game’ as well as investigating the emergence and expansion of the global development and publishing industry.
BibliographyClarke, A. and Mitchell, G. eds. (2007) Videogames and Art. Bristol: Intel
AssessmentGame Reviews

Semester 2

MC5005-20 - Stardom and Celebrity

DepartmentMedia and Communications
Module TitleStardom and Celebrity
Module CodeMC5005-20SemesterTwo
Study Hours28 contact/80 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionStardom and Celebrity aims to provide you with the opportunity to study the key debates in the field of academic star studies and celebrity culture from a number of critical perspectives. The syllabus will begin by identifying changes in the notions of fame, renown and recognition from the emergence of the star system through to the contemporary culture of celebrity, and ask you to consider the ways in which such changes can be understood in relation to wider academic debates concerning class, gender, performance and cultural value. It will go on to explore the notion of synergy and the cross-over star, before looking at critical writing on images, branding and the celebrity commodity. The module will conclude by investigating both the production and reception of celebrity reporting. Stardom and Celebrity will identify a range of contemporary debates and encourage you to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of such literature in relation to a range of relevant case studies. The assessments will test your ability to analyse extant literature in the field, your skills in applying such work to relevant star texts and your capacity to communicate your ideas effectively in a range of written and verbal formats.
Weekly Calendar•the emergence of the star system and the studio era •stars and society •synergy and contemporary Hollywood stardom •hierarchies of stardom •the impossibility of television stardom •fame, talent and the contemporary  culture of celebrity •the celebrity commodity •media production and celebrity reporting
BibliographyMcDonald, Paul (2013) Hollywood Stardom, Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell.
Assessment2500 word essay (50%) Television Treatment (50%)

Music

Semester 1

MT4002-20 - Sound Design for Moving Image

DepartmentMusic
Module TitleSound Design for Moving Image
Module CodeTBCSemesterOne
Study Hours44 contact/130 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionThis module seeks to equip you with an historical, theoretical and practical understanding of the use of sound design and music within broadcast media, including issues of style, convention and meaning.
Weekly CalendarSchedule Fortnightly 4-hour workshops Workshop 1 - Module Overview / Audio and image on DAW 1 Introduction to the module, Defining Sound Design, Accessing and considering possible sound sources, Examples of past student work, Quicktime format, Audio visual bounce. Workshop 2 - Audio and image on DAW / Sound Design Origins 1 Synchronisation, tempo and timeline issues practically explored. Markers, Matching BPM to visual events in DAWs. Workshop 3 - Sound Design Origins 2 / Sound Design Techniques 1 Radiophonic Workshop / Delia Derbyshire / limiting your toolset, Practical workshop on tape music techniques applied to moving image. Radiophonic Workshop Workshop 4 - Seminar on tape techniques task / Sound design in Idents 1 / Assessment Criteria Analysis of examples: Branding, demographic, fashion, Transference of attributes, Cross-media interaction, Movement / Colour / Dynamics, Workshop 5 - Sound design in Idents 2 Practical workshop to examples. Workshop 6 - Sound design Techniques 2 / TV Advert WS task Creativity / Pushing boundaries / Creating Textures - Exploring unusual sound design solutions
BibliographyLotz, Amanda (2014) Cable Guys: Television and Masculinities in the 21st Century, New York: New York University Press
AssessmentPractical Project Portfolio (Idents) 100%

MT4003-20 - Critical Theory

DepartmentMusic
Module TitleCritical Theory
Module CodeMT4003-20SemesterOne
Study Hours22 contact/63 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionThis module provides you with an introduction to theoretical, historical, cultural and political perspectives relevant to the study of Creative Music Technology, as well as improving your writing, research and presentation skills. The module introduces theoretical perspectives by using contemporary debates and examples from art, music and media. The module will explore different forms of writing and oral discourse and aims to help the you develop strong, clear ways to express complex ideas and abstract concepts in your own words.
Weekly CalendarWeek 1: Introduction Week 2: What is philosophy? Week 3: Argumentation Weeks 4-5: Experimental film and media Week 7: Structuralism Week 8: Semiotics Week 9: Existentialism Week 10: Surrealism Week 11: Modernism/Post-modernism
BibliographyBurrill, Derek (2014) The Other Guy: Media Masculinity within the Margins, London: Peter Lang.
AssessmentResearch report : 40% Essay 1: 60%

MT4004-20 - Synthesis and Sampling

DepartmentMusic
Module TitleSynthesis and Sampling
Module CodeMT4004-20SemesterOne
Study Hours22 contact/63 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionStudents are introduced to modular design using graphical object oriented programming environment. The module aims to introduce significant personalisation of tools to extend student awareness beyond frameworks intended by some familiar commercial composition and sound source software.
Weekly CalendarLecture 1 Sound Principles/Workshop 1 Recreate a patch Lecture 2 Intro to Max/MSP /Workshop 2 Your name patch Lecture 3 Sample playback/Workshop 3 Simple groove~ build Lecture 4 Managing numbers/Workshop 4 Patch solution builds 1 Lecture 5 Tempo beat mapping/Workshop 5 Patch solutions 2 Lecture 6 Extending Techniques and objects/Workshop 6 Explore workshop Lecture 7 Interface objects/Workshop 7 Assessment workshops
BibliographyRuss, M. Sound Synthesis and Sampling. Focal Press. 2002 Cann, S. How to Make a Noise: A Comprehensive Guide to Synthesiser Programming. Coombe Hill Publishing. 2011 Miranda, E. Computer Sound Design: Synthesis Techniques and Programming. Focal Press 2002 Millward, S. Sound Synthesis with VST instruments. Focal Press 2008 Software Tutorials in Reaktor/Max/MSP www.cycling74.com
AssessmentPractical Project

MU4001-40 - Performance 1

DepartmentMusic
Module TitlePerformance 1
Module CodeMU4001-40SemesterOne
Study Hours44 contact/130 independentCredits20
Module DescriptionThis module develops your performance skills on an instrument/voice. You also develop improvisation, aural, score-reading and directing skills. The module is intended for classical and jazz performers. You also perform in at least three ensembles (including choirs, orchestras, big bands, and gamelan). This module is subject to audition at entry and is intended for advanced performers.
Weekly CalendarWeek 1: General introduction Week 2: The Inner Game Week 3: How to practise Week 4: Improvisation Week 5: Jazz workshop Week 6: performance session Week 7: performance session Week performance session Week 9: performance session Week 10: performance session Week 11: assessments
BibliographyGreen, B. 1986. The Inner Game of Music. Garden City, NY: Doubleday. Jones, K. 2000. Keeping Your Nerve: Confidence Boosting Strategies for Musicians and Performers. London: Faber.
AssessmentRecital, technical, ensemble report

MU4003-20 - Music in the West

DepartmentMusic
Module TitleMusic in the West
Module CodeMU4003-20SemesterOne
Study Hours22 contact/63 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionThis module presents an overview of western art music. You explore significant repertoire and also gain a broad understanding of western music and its context. There is also an introduction to research and study skills.
Weekly CalendarWeek 1: Introduction Week 2: Hildegard of Bingen; Guillame de Machaut, Mass of Notre Dame Week 3: John Dunstable, Veni creator spiritus; Palestrina: Missa Papae Marcelli Week 4: John Dowland’s Lachrimae (1604); Claudio Monteverdi, Orfeo (1607) Week 5: Corelli, Christmas Concerto (1690); Henry Purcell, Dido and Aeneas (1688) Week 6: J. S. Bach Mass in B minor (1724-49); Vivaldi Gloria (1715) Week 7: Rameau: Les Indes Galantes (1736); W. A Mozart, Marriage of Figaro (1786) Week 8: Joseph Haydn, String Quartets; Ludwig Beethoven, Eroica Symphony (1804) Week 9: Beethoven: Late String Quartets Week 10: Hector Berlioz, Symphonie Fantastique (1830); Franz Liszt, B minor sonata (1853)
BibliographyOxford Music Online (full-text online dictionary) Oxford History of Western Music (full-text online guide) Grout, D.J. & Palisca, C. 2009. A History of Western Music, 8th ed. New York: Norton. Herbert, T. 2001. Music in Words. London: ABRSM. Strunk, O., rev. MacKinnon, J. 1997. Source Readings in Music History. New York: Norton.
AssessmentEssay of 1,500 words on a set topic relating to the repertoire covered, and a study skills exercise and presentation

MU4004-20 - Global Music

DepartmentMusic
Module TitleGlobal Music
Module CodeMU4004-20SemesterOne
Study Hours22 contact/63 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionThis module presents an overview of global musical styles including popular, folk and jazz genres and world music. Music is experienced and investigated in a practical manner where possible. The module also introduces approaches to analysis, gender and fieldwork. The basic precepts and methodologies of ethnomusicology are introduced as well as methods of analysis for popular music.
Weekly CalendarWeek 1: Gamelan; Week 2: Andean Music; Week 3: Study of Musicology; Week 3: Popular Music from 1850 to 1940; Week 4: Beginnings of Jazz; Week 5: African Workshop; Week 6: Jazz in the 1920s; Week 7: Blues Workshop; Week 8: Folk Revivals in Britain and America; Week 9: Swing; Week 10: Aboriginal Music.
BibliographyBohlman, P. 2002. World Music, A Very Short Introduction. New York: OUP; Cook, N. 2000. Music, A Very Short Introduction. Oxford: OUP; Cooke, M. & Horn, D. 2002. The Cambridge Companion to Jazz. Cambridge: CUP; Straw W. Frith, S. (Eds.) 2001. The Cambridge Companion to Pop and Rock. Cambridge: CUP.
AssessmentListening test (20%) and essay of 2,000 words (80%).

MU5001-40 - Music Professional

DepartmentMusic
Module TitleMusic Professional
Module CodeMU5001-40SemesterOne
Study Hours33 contact/142 independentCredits20
Module DescriptionThis module develops your awareness of developments in the music industry and in music education, and introduces and develops a wide range of skills related to employability within music. These include communication, marketing, planning and organization, time management and teaching.
Weekly CalendarWeek 1: Introduction to instrumental/vocal teaching ; Week 2: Learning styles; Week 3: Career Skills; Week 4: Composition; Week 5: Running a Venue; Week 6: Freelancing; Week 7: Festival Management; Week 8: Music Education in the UK; Week 9: Music In Schools; Week 10: Marketing Tools for the musician.
BibliographyEveritt, A. 1977. Joining In, London: Gulbenkian. Ford, T. 2000. The Musician’s Handbook. London: Rheingold. Gardner, H. 1983. Frames of Mind. New York, NY: Basic Books. Hallam, S. 1998. Instrumental Teaching: A practical guide to better teaching and Learning. London: Heinemann. Harris, P. and Crozier, R., 2000. The Music Teacher’s Companion: A Practical Guide. London: ABRSM. Mills, J. 2007. Instrumental teaching. London: OUP. Philpott, C. & Spruce, G. 2012. Debates in Music Teaching. London: Routledge.
AssessmentAssessment: assessed lesson (40%); creation of marketing materials (30%); commentary on professional skills (30%)

MU5004-20 - Music Analysis

DepartmentMusic
Module TitleMusic Analysis
Module CodeMU5004-20SemesterOne
Study Hours22 contact/63 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionThis module introduces a variety of analytical techniques for music from the classical period to the present day, together with issues of analysis and perception. The module relates the close study of scores to the process of listening and comprehending, and introduces a perspective from music psychology with a study of perception experiments and empirical findings.
Weekly CalendarWeek 1: Introduction and voice-leading; Week 2: Voice-leading; Week 3: Semiotic 1; Week 4: Semiotic 2: Week 5: Generative Theory 1; Week 6: Generative Theory 2; Week 7: Serial 1; Week 8: Serial 2; Week 9: Set theory 1: Week 10: Set theory 2
BibliographyAiello, R. 1994. Musical Perceptions. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Clarke, E. 2005. Ways of Listening. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Cook, N. 1987. A Guide to Musical Analysis. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Deliège, I. 1996. Musical Beginnings. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Juslin, P.N. 2001. Music and Emotion. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Lehmann. A., Sloboda, J., Woody, R. 2007. Psychology for Musicians: Understanding and Acquiring the Skills. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Parncutt, R. 2002. The Science and Psychology of Musical Performance. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Sloboda, J. 2005. Exploring the Musical Mind: Cognition, Emotion, Function. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
AssessmentAssessment: Analysis portfolio (100%)

MU5006-20 - Creative Forum 2

DepartmentMusic
Module TitleCreative Forum 2
Module CodeMU5006-20SemesterOne
Study Hours22 contact/63 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionIn this module you will explore different approaches to composing through undertaking set tasks and learning about contemporary composition techniques and philosophies. One element will focus on composing for film, which allows you to explore the value of another art form for your own subject. A free composition folio strand supported by seminars and tutorials aims to foster the development of a personal style through offering a choice of projects (currently: writing for solo performer, electronics, or wind quintet).
Weekly CalendarWeek 1: Introduction Week 2 Folio seminars. Week 3 Folio seminars. Week 4 Film Composition 1: introduction to working with film; Folio seminars. Week 5 Film Composition 2: using technology; Folio seminars. Week 6 Film Composition 3: style; Folio seminars. Week 7 Film Composition 4: spotting; Folio seminars. Week 8 Film Composition 5: structures. Week 9 Folio seminars. Week 10 Folio seminars. Week 11 Folio seminars.
BibliographyCole, 1974. Sounds and Signs: Aspects of Music Notation. Oxford: OUP. Ford, A., 1993. Composer to Composer: Conversations About Contemporary Music. London: Quartet. Gould, E., 2011. Behind Bars: the Definitive Guide to Music Notation. London: Faber Music. Griffiths P., 1995. Modern Music and After, Oxford, OUP. Homewood, S & Matthews C. 1990. The Essentials of Music Copying. London: Music Publishers’ Association. Karlin, F. & Wright, R. 2004. On the Track: A Guide to Contemporary Film Scoring. New York: Routledge Holmes, T., 2002. Electronic and Experimental Music: Pioneers in Technology and Composition. London: Mahnkopf, K., 2004. The Foundations of Contemporary Composing. Berlin: Wolke Verlag. Nyman, M., 2000. Experimental Music. Cambridge, CUP. Routledge. Risatti, H., 1975. New Music Vocabulary. Illinois: University of Illinois Press. Stone, K., 1980. Music Notation in the Twentieth Century. New York: Norton.
AssessmentAssessment: 100% folio: 1 film composition project and one folio composition.

MU5009-20 - Musicology 2

DepartmentMusic
Module TitleMusicology 2
Module CodeMU5009-20SemesterOne
Study Hours22 contact/63 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionThis module develops your knowledge and skills in musicology by exploring musical repertoire, style, process and context through the study of specific topics. You will cover a wide variety of music including that of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. We aim for you to develop your own independent analytical and critical voice in the context of a variety of musicological study areas.
Weekly CalendarWeek 1: Mozart and Gluck; Week 2: Haydn Symphonies and Quartets; Week 3: Mozart operas: Week 4: Early Beethoven: birth of Romanticism; Week 5: Beethoven – middle and late periods: Week 6: Schubert; Week 7: Schumann and Liszt; Week 8: Mahler; Week 9: Bruckner and beyond; Week 10: Richard Strauss.
BibliographyBurkholder, Grout, D.J., rev. Palisca, C.V. (8/2009), A History of Western Music (Norton). Sadie, S, ed. (2000-), Grove7 (New Grove Dictionary, 2nd edition) (Macmillan). Sadie, Stanley, ed. The History of Opera, New Grove Handbooks in Music (Macmillan, 1980). Schulenberg, D. (2001), Music of the Baroque (Oxford U.P.). Taruskin, Richard. (2009), Music in the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries. Oxford, OUP. Taruskin, Richard (2009), Music in the Nineteenth Century. (OUP).
AssessmentPortfolio of written work (2,000 words, 50%); oral presentation (50%)

MU5010-20 - Music and Its' Cultural Contexts

DepartmentMusic
Module TitleMusic and Its' Cultural Contexts
Module CodeMU5010-20SemesterOne
Study Hours22 contact/63 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionThis module explores contexts of music and music-making in a variety of genres and cultures across the world through fieldwork and research. You will have the opportunity to study music as a social phenomenon and its capacity for expressing and defining social relationships, cultural meanings and individual and group identities.
Weekly CalendarWeek 1: Introduction; Week 2: Fieldwork preparation; Week 3: Fieldwork examples; Week 4: Musical instruments, classification and social function; Week 5: Application of ethnomusicology; Week 6: Analysis and transcription; Week 7: Notation and tablature; Week 8: Analysis and transcription; Week 9: Exploring notation systems; Week 10: Presentations
BibliographyBerliner, P. (1994) Thinking in Jazz: the Infinite art of Improvisation. Chicago University Press. Blacking, J. (1976) How Musical is Man? Washington University Press, 1974. Brailoiu, C. (1984) Problems of Ethnomusicology. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Gabbard, K. (1995) Jazz Among the Discourses. Durham and London: Duke University Press. May, E. (1983) Musics of Many Cultures. Berkeley: University of California Press. Merriam, A. (1978) The Anthropology of Music. Evanston III: Northwestern University Press. Myers, H. (1992) Ethnomusicology, an Introduction. London: Macmillan. Nettl, B. (1964) Theory and Method in Ethnomusicology. New York: Macmillan. Nettl, B. (1983) The Study of Ethnomusicology Urbana and Chicago: University of Illinois Press. Nettl B. and Stone,,R. M.(1998) The Garland Encyclopedia of World Music. London: Garland.
AssessmentEssay (1,000 words); analysis and transcription.

Semester 2

MU4001-40 - Performance 1

DepartmentMusic
Module TitlePerformance 1
Module CodeMU4001-40SemesterTwo
Study Hours56 contact/166 independentCredits20
Module DescriptionThis module develops your performance skills on an instrument/voice. You also develop improvisation, aural, score-reading and directing skills. The module is intended for classical and jazz performers. You also perform in at least three ensembles (including choirs, orchestras, big bands, and gamelan). This module is subject to audition at entry and is intended for advanced performers.
Weekly CalendarWeek 1: Memorising music Week 2: Performance practice Week 3: Ensemble skills Week 4: Performance session Week 5: Performance session Week 6: Performance session Week 7: Performance session Week 8: Performance session Week 9: Performance session Week 10: Performance session Week 11: Assessments
BibliographyPratt, G. 1988. Aural Awareness. Oxford, OUP. Weisberg, A. 1996. Performing Twentieth Century Music: a Handbook for Conductors and Instrumentalists. Yale: Yale UP. Williamon, A. 2004. Musical Excellence (Oxford: OUP) The Cambridge Companion volumes, including, by way of example: T Herbert & J Wallace, Brass. 1997, R Ingham, Saxophone (1998), C Lawson, Clarinet. 1995, D Rowland, Piano (1998), R Stowell, Cello (1999).
AssessmentRecital, aural assessment, technical, ensemble report

MU4003-20 - Music in the West

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DepartmentMusic
Module TitleMusic in the West
Module CodeMU4003-20SemesterTwo
Study Hours28 contact/80 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionThis module presents an overview of western art music. You explore significant repertoire and also gain a broad understanding of western music and its context. There is also an introduction to research and study skills.
Weekly CalendarWeek 1: Schumann, Carnaval (1835); Week 2: Mendelssohn, Violin Concerto (1845); Week 3: Mahler, Second Symphony (1895); Week 4: Richard Wagner, Lohengrin; Week 5: Arnold Schoenberg, Verklärte Nacht (1899); Week 6: Richard Strauss, Salome (1905) and Arabella (1933); Week 7: Alban Berg, Piano Sonata, Op. 1 (1909), Week 8: Claude Debussy, Voiles/Preludes Book 1, 1909-10; Week 9: Igor Stravinsky, Symphonies of Wind Instruments (1920), Week 10: Jean Sibelius, Tapiola (1926); Week 11: Charles Ives, Fourth Symphony (1910-16)
BibliographyOxford Music Online (full-text online dictionary) Oxford History of Western Music (full-text online guide) Grout, D.J. & Palisca, C. 2009. A History of Western Music, 8th ed. New York: Norton. Herbert, T. 2001. Music in Words. London: ABRSM. Strunk, O., rev. MacKinnon, J. 1997. Source Readings in Music History. New York: Norton.
AssessmentAssessment: Essay of 1,500 words on a set topic relating to the repertoire covered, and a study skills exercise and presentation.

Global Music

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DepartmentMusic
Module TitleGlobal Music
Module CodeMU4004-20SemesterTwo
Study Hours28 contact/80 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionThis module presents an overview of global musical styles. Music is experienced and investigated in a practical manner where possible. The module also introduces approaches to analysis, gender and fieldwork. The basic precepts and methodologies of ethnomusicology are introduced as well as methods of analysis for popular music.
Weekly CalendarWeek 1: Sub-Saharan Africa; Week 2: Klezmer; Week 3: Indian Music; Week 4: Rise of popular music in 1950s; Week 5: Jazz in the 40s and 50s; Week 6: Popular music in the 1960s and 70s; Week 7: Jazz in the 1960s and 70s; Week 8: Jazz in the 1980s and Beyond; Week 8: Music of China; Week 9: Popular Music in the 80s and beyond; Week 10: Folk Session; Week 11: Folk music of the Mediterranean.
BibliographyBohlman, P. 2002. World Music, A Very Short Introduction. New York: OUP; Cook, N. 2000. Music, A Very Short Introduction. Oxford: OUP; Cooke, M. & Horn, D. 2002. The Cambridge Companion to Jazz. Cambridge: CUP; Straw W. Frith, S. (Eds.) 2001. The Cambridge Companion to Pop and Rock. Cambridge: CUP.
AssessmentListening test (20%) and essay of 2,000 words (80%).

MU5006-20 - Creative Forum 2a

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DepartmentMusic
Module TitleCreative Forum 2a
Module CodeMU5006-20SemesterTwo
Study Hours28 contact/80 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionIn taught elements you will explore different approaches to composing through undertaking set tasks and through lectures on models of contemporary composition techniques and philosophies. One element will focus on orchestration for classical orchestra, wind band or jazz big band. A free composition folio strand supported by seminars and tutorials aims to foster the development of a personal style through offering a choice of projects. These are currently: writing for 2 pianos, site-specific work, or composing for jazz combo.
Weekly CalendarWeek 1 Orchestration: introduction; Folio seminars (writing for 2 pianos, site-specific work, or jazz). Week 2 Orchestration: The Big Picture; Folio seminars. Week 3 Orchestration: writing for strings; Folio seminars. Week 4 Orchestration: writing for woodwind; Folio seminars. Week 5 Orchestration: writing for brass; Folio seminars. Week 6 Orchestration: writing for percussion; Folio seminars. Week 7 Orchestration: full orchestration A; Folio seminars. Week 8 Orchestration: full orchestration B; Folio seminars. Week 9 Orchestration: scores and parts; Folio seminars. Week 10 Folio seminars. Week 11 Folio seminars. Week 12 Folio seminars.
BibliographyCole, 1974. Sounds and Signs: Aspects of Music Notation. Oxford: OUP. Forsyth, C. 1963. Orchestration. London: Macmillan. Homewood, S & Matthews C. 1990. The Essentials of Music Copying. London: Music Publishers’ Association. Jacob, G. 1982. Orchestral Technique. Oxford: OUP. Kennan, K. & Grantham, D. 1983. The Technique of Orchestration. New Jersey: Prentice Hall. Piston, W. 1991. Orchestration. New York: Gollancz. Risatti, H., 1975. New Music Vocabulary. Illinois: University of Illinois Press. Stone, K., 1980. Music Notation in the Twentieth Century. New York: Norton.
AssessmentAssessment: folio: one orchestration assignment and one folio composition.

MU5009-20 - Musicology 2a

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DepartmentMusic
Module TitleMusicology 2a
Module CodeMU5009-20SemesterTwo
Study Hours28 contact/80 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionThis module develops your knowledge and skills in musicology by exploring musical repertoire, style, process and context through the study of specific topics. You will cover a wide variety of music including that of the eighteenth century as well as experimental music of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. We aim for you to develop your own independent analytical and critical voice in the context of a variety of musicological study areas.
Weekly CalendarWeek 1: Open Work 1: What you see is what you get?; Week 2: Open Work 2: Playing the raisins in a slice of fruitcake: approaches to realising graphic notation; Week 3: Open Work 3: Words Events: verbal notation and processes; Week 4: Open Work 4: Realising Open Scores; Week 5: Open Work 5: The Open Work; Week 6: Handel Operas; Week 7: Handel Oratorios; Week 8: Bach Cantatas; Week 9: Bach Passions; Week 9: Bach: the instrumental music; Week 10: The ‘galant style’.
BibliographyReading: Burkholder, Grout, D.J., rev. Palisca, C.V. (8/2009), A History of Western Music (Norton). Sadie, S, ed. (2000-), Grove7 (New Grove Dictionary, 2nd edition) (Macmillan). Sadie, Stanley, ed. The History of Opera, New Grove Handbooks in Music (Macmillan, 1980). Schulenberg, D. (2001), Music of the Baroque (Oxford U.P.). Taruskin, Richard. (2009), Music in the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries. Oxford, OUP. Taruskin, Richard (2009), Music in the Nineteenth Century. (OUP).
AssessmentPortfolio of written work (2,000 words, 50%); oral presentation (50%)

Philosophy

Semester 1

PE4000-40 - Truth and Value 1 (Introduction to Philosophical Enquiry)

DepartmentPhilosophy and Ethics
Module TitleTruth and Value 1 (Introduction to Philosophical Enquiry)
Module CodePE4000-40SemesterOne
Study Hours44 contact/130 independentCredits20
Module DescriptionThis module introduces a number of principles of philosophical analysis and enquiry and explores some core concepts, debates and arguments in the fields of epistemology and metaphysics. The module promotes reflection on such questions as: what is knowledge, what is ultimately real and what is a human being.
Weekly CalendarLectures (2hrs) and Seminars (2hrs)
BibliographyMorton, A. (2003) Philosophy in Practice. Oxford: Blackwell Publishing. Conee, E. and Sider, T. (2005) Riddles of Existence: A Guided Tour of Metaphysics. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
AssessmentEssay (50%), Presentation (50%)

Semester 2

PE4000-40 - Truth and Value 2 (Introduction to Ethical Enquiry)

DepartmentPhilosophy and Ethics
Module TitleTruth and Value 2 (Introduction to Ethical Enquiry)
Module CodePE4000-40SemesterTwo
Study Hours56 contact/166 independentCredits20
Module DescriptionThis module introduces a number of principles of ethical analysis and enquiry and explores some core concepts, debates and arguments in the fields of ethics and social and political philosophy. The module promotes reflection on such questions as: are morals relative, what is a good action and how should one live?
Weekly CalendarLectures (2hrs) and seminars (2hrs)
BibliographyTEthics Toolkit: A Compendium of Ethical Concepts and Tools. Oxford: Blackwell Publishing
AssessmentEssay (50%), Presentation (50%)

PE5101-20 - Atheism and Unbelief (Philosophical Perspectives on the Non-existence of God)

DepartmentPhilosophy and Ethics
Module TitleAtheism and Unbelief (Philosophical Perspectives on the Non-existence of God)
Module CodeTPE5101-20SemesterTwo
Study Hours28 contact/80 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionThis module explores atheism as a topic of considerable contemporary significance for religions, philosophies and ethics. It examines atheism from an inter-disciplinary perspective to reveal the history, nature and implications of the apparent rise of atheism in the contemporary world. In the first semester, atheism is approached in a primarily historical perspective, examining its ancient origins and its modern reinvention and raising some key (and provocative) issues such the definition of atheism and reasons for the rise of modern (and contemporary) atheism.
Weekly CalendarLectures and seminars
BibliographyBaggini, J. A Very Short Introduction to Atheism (Oxford University Press, 2003). Bullivant, S. and Ruse, M. (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Atheism (Oxford University Press, 2013). Hyman, G. A Short History of Atheism (I. B. Tauris, 2010). Martin, M. (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Atheism (Cambridge University Press, 2007)
AssessmentProject proposal and individual project

PE6009-20 - Life and Meaning (Philosophy and the Human Condition)

DepartmentPhilosophy and Ethics
Module TitleLife and Meaning (Philosophy and the Human Condition)
Module CodePE6009-20SemesterTwo
Study Hours21 contact/87 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionThis module promotes the analysis of philosophical arguments, concepts and debates pertaining to the nature and meaning of the human condition. Representative topics to be covered include: the role of happiness and suffering in human existence, Jean-Paul Sartre’s Existentialism, the analysis of existential moods such as anguish and boredom.
Weekly CalendarWorkshops based on required reading
BibliographyBryman, A., (2012) Social Research Methods. 4th Ed. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Geaves, R. (2007) ‘Fieldwork in the Study of Religion.’ In: Chryssides, G. & Geaves, R. The Study of Religion: An Introduction to Key Ideas and Methods. London & New York: Continuum Walsh, D. (2004) ‘Doing Ethnography.’ In: Seale, C. ed. Researching Society and Culture. London, Thousand Oaks & New Delhi: Sage
AssessmentPresentation (50%) and research project (50%)

Psychology

Semester 1

PS4001-40 - Introduction to Psychology

DepartmentPsychology
Module TitleIntroduction to Psychology
Module CodePS4001-40SemesterOne
Study Hours44 contact/130 independentCredits20
Module DescriptionThis module aims to provide students with a introduction to the main areas within the discipline of psychology. It aims to help students develop an overall understanding of the use of scientific principles in the investigation and development of psychological thinking. You will be introduced to Psychology as an academic subject and learn more about the key theories, approaches and applications of the subject.
Weekly CalendarThe core areas of psychology covered in this semester will be conceptual and historical issues in psychology (e.g., the scientific context of psychology; approaches to psychology), biological psychology (e.g., brain anatomy; neurons and synapses; the central nervous system) and abnormal psychology (e.g., defining abnormal behaviour; assessment and classification; in depth examples of specific psychological disorders). It will also cover other topics of interest that align with the research expertise of our staff.
BibliographyHolt, N.J., Bremner, A., Sutherland, E., Vliek, M., Passer, M. and Smith, R. (2012) Psychology: The Science of Mind and Behaviour (2nd edition). London: McGraw Hill
AssessmentGroup presentation 50% Essay 50%

PS4003-20 - Individual Difference: Classic and Contemporary Debates in Personality and Intelligence

DepartmentPsychology
Module TitleIndividual Difference: Classic and Contemporary Debates in Personality and Intelligence
Module CodePS4003-20SemesterOne
Study Hours22 contact/63 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionThis module will introduce you to the main perspectives, applications and controversies within personality and intelligence testing. As such you will focus on past and present theorists in both, and examine the strengths and weaknesses of these approaches. We will also look at where both personality and intelligence tests are used, such as the workplace and schools, and discuss subjects such as racial and gender differences.
Weekly CalendarIntroduction to theories of personality: motivation, dispositional and behavioural, and the biological basis of personality. Whether there are gender and/or racial differences and the nature-nurture debate: which is responsible for personality? Intelligence testing - the history and controversies. Uses of intelligence tests, and race differences in intelligence.
BibliographyMaltby, J., Day, L. and Macaskill, A. (2013) Personality, Individual Differences and Intelligence. Harlow, Essex: Pearson Education Ltd.
AssessmentEssay Plan (20%); Essay (80%)

PS500*-20 - Psychology of Health

DepartmentPsychology
Module TitlePsychology of Health
Module CodePS500*-20SemesterOne
Study Hours22 contact/63 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionThis module aims to provide students with an introduction to psychology as applied to health, introducing students to some of the key issues and debates in this field. In addition to theoretical perspectives on health, a range of practical applications are covered. We debate definitions of health; biomedical and biopsychosocial models of health and illness; key cognitions including social cognition models; the stress-illness link; and topics such as pain, sexual health, and facial disfigurement.
Weekly CalendarHealth Psychology as a discipline; representations of health and illness; psychological health and positive psychology; the socio-political context of health and illness; STIs and HIV infection; assessing psychological health; psychosocial moderator variables in pain; the stress-illness link; facial disfigurement; how theoretical models such as Locus of Control, Stages of Change, Health Belief Model, Protection Motivation Theory, Theory of Planned Behaviour etc contribute to our understanding of risky and non-risky health decisions we all make.
BibliographyOgden, J. (2012) Health Psychology: A Textbook, 5th Edition, Maidenhead: Open University Press.
AssessmentPolitical report recommending to MPs how to improve the nation's health in one aspect, using theory and empirical evidence from Health Psychology (100%)

PS500*-20 - Abnormal Psychology

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DepartmentPsychology
Module TitleAbnormal Psychology
Module CodePS500*-20SemesterOne
Study Hours22 contact/63 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionThis module aims to provide students with an introduction to abnormal psychology and therefore will particularly useful for students who are interested in clinical psychology, mental health or counselling psychology. The module begins with challenging the definition of ‘abnormality’ from the historical, social-cultural, chronological and statistical perspectives. Subsequent sessions aims to provide an insight into specific mental disorders , such as somatoform and mood disorders.
Weekly CalendarWhat’s normal/ abnormal?!; Assessment and classification of abnormal behaviour; Treatment options for abnormalities.
BibliographyKring, A. M., Johnson, S.L., Davison, G.C., & Neale, J.M. (2013). Abnormal Psychology. Int. Ed. Wiley & Sons.
AssessmentThe assessment for the first semester consists of a required Formative Diary and a Reflective Diary (100%). The aim of the assessment is to evaluate how your perception of abnormal behaviour has been challenged by the content of the module.

PS5004-20 - Social Psychology

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DepartmentPsychology
Module TitleSocial Psychology
Module CodePS5004-20SemesterOne
Study Hours22 contact/63 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionThe aim of this module is to study social psychological topics as specified by the BPS (British Psychological Society) psychology framework. The course begins with an examination of the field of social psychology, its history, methods and the ethical issues that arise in the study of social behaviour. Subsequent lectures widen the focus of study from individual social psychology (e.g. social cognition, attribution theory, attitudes) through to interpersonal social psychology (e.g. relationships) and on to social influence (e.g. obedience).
Weekly CalendarThe history and development of social psychology; Social psychological research methods; The ethics of social psychological research; Wider ethical issues of social psychological research; The nature of social information processing; Attribution theory; Attitudes and behaviour; Close relationships; Understudied relationships; Obedience to authority.
BibliographyHogg, M.A. and Vaughan, G.M. (2013). Social Psychology (7th. Ed.) London: Prentice Hall.
AssessmentA 2,500 word extended essay

PS6005-20 - Psychology of Health

DepartmentPsychology
Module TitlePsychology of Health
Module CodePS6005-20SemesterOne
Study Hours17 contact/68 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionThis module aims to provide students with a critical introduction to psychology as applied to health, introducing students to some of the key issues and debates in this field. This module is concerned with the relationships between psychology and health. Issues will be considered from psychosocial and, to a lesser extent, biological perspectives, and include the micro- and macro-context of health and illness, the experience of being ‘ill’, treating illness, health-risk behaviours and health enhancement. The focus throughout will be on contemporary issues and concerns. In addition to theoretical perspectives on health, a range of practical applications are covered.
Weekly CalendarUnderstanding human behaviour in relation to health and illness; biomedical and biopsychosocial perspectives on health and illness; the interrelationship between health and behaviour with reference to issues such as stress, pain and chronic illness; the complex interplay between psychosocial and psychobiological factors; and continuing developments in approaches to health psychology.
BibliographyOgden, J. (2012) Health Psychology: A Textbook, 5th Edition, Maidenhead: Open University Press.
AssessmentPolitical report recommending to MPs how to improve the nation's health in one aspect, using theory and empirical evidence from Health Psychology (100%)

PS6018-20 - Social Psychology of Peace and Conflict

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DepartmentPsychology
Module TitleSocial Psychology of Peace and Conflict
Module CodePS6018-20SemesterOne
Study Hours17 contact/68 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionThis module studies the underlying social psychology of peace and conflict. The first semester concentrates on the social psychology of conflict.
Weekly CalendarSemester 1 topics are: The causes and effects of conflict; genocide and its' prevention; social psychological analysis of the Holocaust; gendercide; and intractable conflicts.
BibliographyMcNair, R. (2011). The Psychology of Peace: An Introduction (2nd Ed). Westport, CT: Praeger.
AssessmentA 3,000 word coursework assignment: This is either a social psychological analysis of a specified conflict (e.g. Rwanda, the Balkans conflict, Northern Ireland) or a social psychological analysis of a specified Holocaust text (e.g. Browning's 'Ordinary Men' or Lifton's 'The Nazi Doctors'

PS6023-20 - Neuropsychology

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DepartmentPsychology
Module TitleNeuropsychology
Module CodePS6023-20SemesterOne
Study Hours17 contact/68 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionThis module covers the skills and techniques of the clinical neuropsychologist and starts to look at how the brain functions.
Weekly CalendarNeuroanatomy; Methods and techniques in neuropsychology; Cerebral asymmetry; Problems with perception; Problems with language; Problems with memory.
BibliographyElias and Saucier (2013) Neuropsychology: Clinical and Experimental Foundations.
AssessmentEssay (100%)

PS6024-20 - Individual Difference: Classic and Contemporary Debates in Personality and Intelligence

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DepartmentPsychology
Module TitleIndividual Difference: Classic and Contemporary Debates in Personality and Intelligence
Module CodePS6024-20SemesterOne
Study Hours17 contact/68 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionIn this module you will learn about the main perspectives, applications and controversies within personality and intelligence testing. As such you will focus on past and present theorists in both, and examine the strengths and weaknesses of these approaches. We will also look at where both personality and intelligence tests are used, such as the workplace and schools, and discuss subjects such as racial and gender differences
Weekly CalendarIntroduction to theories of personality: motivation, dispositional and behavioural, and the biological basis of personality. Whether there are gender and/or racial differences and the nature-nurture debate: which is responsible for personality? Intelligence testing - the history and controversies. Uses of intelligence tests, and race differences in intelligence.
BibliographyMaltby, J., Day, L. and Macaskill, A. (2013) Personality, Individual Differences and Intelligence. Harlow, Essex: Pearson Education Ltd.
AssessmentEssay Plan (20%); Essay (80%)

Semester 2

PS4001-40 - Introduction to Psychology

DepartmentPsychology
Module TitleIntroduction to Psychology
Module CodePS4001-40SemesterTwo
Study Hours56 contact/166 independentCredits20
Module DescriptionThis module aims to provide students with a introduction to the main areas within the discipline of psychology. It aims to help students develop an overall understanding of the use of scientific principles in the investigation and development of psychological thinking. You will focus on developmental psychology, social psychology and cognitive psychology as well as exploring careers and employability skills within the field of Psychology.
Weekly CalendarThe core areas of psychology covered in this semester will be developmental psychology (e.g., physical, cognitive, social, emotional and personality development), social psychology (e.g., social influence and thinking; relationships, prejudice, conformity, pro-and anti-social behaviour), and cognitive psychology (e.g., sensation and perception; memory; language; applied cognition). It will also look at careers in psychology and other topics of interest that align with the research expertise of our staff.
BibliographyHolt, N.J., Bremner, A., Sutherland, E., Vliek, M., Passer, M. and Smith, R. (2012) Psychology: The Science of Mind and Behaviour (2nd edition). London: McGraw Hill
AssessmentEssay 65% Class Test 35%

PS500*-20 - Abnormal Psychology

DepartmentPsychology
Module TitleAbnormal Psychology
Module CodePS500*-20SemesterTwo
Study Hours28 contact/80 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionThis semester aims to explore the causes and treatment options for specific mental disorders, such as anxiety, eating disorders, personality disorders, autism and sexual disorders. Each disorders will be discussed from various psychological perspectives (e.g., psychodynamic, behavioural, and cognitive). The final part of the course will focus on the ‘over medicalization of madness’.
Weekly CalendarEating disorders; Personality disorders; Schizophrenia; Developmental disorders; Autism; Sexual disorders.
BibliographyKring, A. M., Johnson, S.L., Davison, G.C., & Neale, J.M. (2013). Abnormal Psychology. Int. Ed. Wiley & Sons.
AssessmentA seen exam worth up to 100% of your final grade. A seen exam is not like a regular exam. With a seen exam you are expected to spend time preparing two essays that you will recreate under exam conditions. You will get the paper with enough time to do library research and get interlibrary loans if necessary. If you only use textbooks, recommended reading, course handouts or one only one journal article to answer the exam question, you will not get a good grade

PS5004-20 - Social Psychology

DepartmentPsychology
Module TitleSocial Psychology
Module CodePS5004-20SemesterTwo
Study Hours28 contact/80 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionIn this module we study social psychological topics as specified by the BPS (British Psychological Society) psychology framework. The second semester continues the trend of widening the focus of study from group social psychology (e.g. majority and minority influence), through to social issues (e.g. prejudice, intergroup aggression, media effects), and ending with the study of the effects of the environment on social behaviour.
Weekly CalendarMajority Influence; Minority influence; The causes of prejudice; The reduction of prejudice; Inter-personal aggression; Inter-group aggression; The anti-social effects of the media; The pro-social effects of the media; Human altruism; Bystander behaviour; Altruism in the real world; Environmental social psychology.
BibliographyHogg, M.A. and Vaughan, G.M. (2013). Social Psychology (7th. Ed.) London: Prentice Hall
AssessmentA two-hour unseen examination requiring students to answer two essay questions from the topics covered in lectures and associated reading.

PS6018-20 - Social Psychology of Peace and Conflict

DepartmentPsychology
Module TitleSocial Psychology of Peace and Conflict
Module CodePS6018-20SemesterTwo
Study Hours21 contact/87 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionThe social psychology of peace and conflict resolution, with particular attention to application of these principles in the real world.
Weekly CalendarSemester 2 topics are: Psychological concepts in conflict and its resolution: models of conflict resolution; conflict resolution in everyday life; culture and conflict resolution; nonviolence; the 'gentle lives' approach.
BibliographyMcNair, R. (2011). The Psychology of Peace: An Introduction (2nd Ed). Westport, CT: Praeger
AssessmentUnseen examination (2 hours) on topics linked to the social psychology of peace.

Religion

Semester 1

SR4000-40 - Beyond Belief (Introduction to the Study of Religions and Spiritualities)

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DepartmentReligion
Module TitleBeyond Belief (Introduction to the Study of Religions and Spiritualities)
Module CodeSR4000-40SemesterOne
Study Hours44 contact/130 independentCredits20
Module DescriptionThis module examines the meaning of ‘religion’ and ‘spirituality; introduces key methods for studying religions such as sociology, psychology, history, texts, phenomenology, feminist approaches and explores a range of less familiar traditions e.g. Paganism, Goddess spirituality, Druids, Baha’i Faith, Rastafari
Weekly CalendarLectures and seminars with student presentations
BibliographyChryssides, G.D. and Geaves, R. eds. (2014) The Study of Religion: An Introduction to Key Ideas and Methods. 2nd Ed. London: Continuum. Hinnells, J.R. ed. (2003) A New Handbook of Living Religions. London: Penguin. Pearson, J. ed. (2002) Belief Beyond Boundaries: Wicca, Celtic Spirituality and the New Age. Ashgate/Open University. Woodhead, L. ed. (2009) Religions in the Modern World 2nd ed. London: Routledge
AssessmentEssay (50%) and Learning Portfolio (50%)

SR5001-20 - Buddhism: Historical and Doctrinal Developments

DepartmentReligion
Module TitleBuddhism: Historical and Doctrinal Developments
Module CodeSR5001-20SemesterOne
Study Hours56 contact/166 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionThis module will examine the birth of the main philosophical and doctrinal ideas of Buddhism in specific historical contexts in India, their development and spread from its Indian origins to South Asia and East Asia. With attention to historical contexts, you will examine the way Buddhism became a major translocal influence by the time of Emperor Aśoka and eventually an important cultural and religious influence all across Asia.
Weekly CalendarIntroduction to the Module: Overview Buddhism: Historical Overview; Non-Buddhist Background: The Brahmanic Tradition; Who was the Buddha? Life and Philosophy of Siddhartha Gautama; Formative essay tutorials; Basic Teachings Continued; Theravada and Mahayana Buddhism; The Pali Canon; The Spread of Buddhism Beyond India.
BibliographyBuswell, E. (ed.), Encyclopedia of Buddhism (New York: Macmillan Reference USA, 2003). Gombrich, R. What the Buddha Thought (London: Equinox, 2009)
AssessmentEssay Length: 3,000 words

SR6006-20 - Religion, Culture and Society in Japan

DepartmentReligion
Module TitleReligion, Culture and Society in Japan
Module CodeSR6006-20SemesterOne
Study Hours17 contact/68 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionThis module introduces the religions, cultural practices and social norms of ancient and modern Japan with reference to the two main religious traditions of Japan—Buddhism and Shinto—along with Confucianism. The module will introduce you to the historical and theoretical aspects of the development of Japanese religions.
Weekly Calendarectures and seminars
BibliographyEarhart, H.B. Religions of Japan: Many Traditions Within One Sacred Way. Prospect Heights, IL: Waveland Press, 1984. Kitagawa, J.M. On Understanding Japanese Religion. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1987. Nelson, J.K. A Year in the Life of a Shinto Shrine. Seattle and London: Washington University Press, 1996.
AssessmentFormative essay plan and essay (100%)

Semester 2

SR4000-40 - Beyond Belief (Introduction to the Study of Religions and Spiritualities)

DepartmentReligion
Module TitleBeyond Belief (Introduction to the Study of Religions and Spiritualities)
Module CodeSR4000-40SemesterTwo
Study Hours56 contact/166 independentCredits20
Module DescriptionThis is the second half of a module which introduces key methods for studying religions such as sociology, psychology, history, texts, phenomenology, feminist approaches and explores a range of less familiar traditions such as Paganism, Goddess spirituality, Druids, Baha’i Faith, Rastafari. In this half there is a study visit to Glastonbury, centre of new age spirituality.
Weekly CalendarLectures and seminars with student presentations
BibliographyChryssides, G.D. and Geaves, R. eds. (2014) The Study of Religion: An Introduction to Key Ideas and Methods. 2nd Ed. London: Continuum Hinnells, J.R. ed. (2003) A New Handbook of Living Religions. London: Penguin. Pearson, J. ed. (2002) Belief Beyond Boundaries: Wicca, Celtic Spirituality and the New Age Ashgate/Open University. Woodhead, L. ed. (2002) Religions in the Modern World London: Routledge. AND/OR Woodhead, L. ed. (2009) Religions in the Modern World 2nd ed. London: Routledge.
AssessmentGroup presentation (50%) Exam or essay alternative (50%)

SR5009-20 - Philosophy, Religion and the Environment

DepartmentReligion
Module TitlePhilosophy, Religion and the Environment
Module CodeSR5009-20SemesterTwo
Study Hours28 contact/80 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionThis module promotes systematic enquiry into the concepts of environment and nature. It investigates philosophical and religious resources for thinking about the environment and nature.
Weekly CalendarLectures and workshops
BibliographyLight, A. and Rolston III, H. eds (2006) Environmental Ethics: An Anthology. Oxford: Blackwell Publishing. Jamieson, D. ed. (2003) A Companion to Environmental Philosophy. Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell Light, A. and Rolston III, H. eds (2006) Environmental Ethics: An Anthology. Oxford: Blackwell Publishing. Jamieson, D. ed. (2003) A Companion to Environmental Philosophy. Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell
AssessmentIndividual project (100%)

Sociology

Semester 1

SC6112-20 - Global Mobility, Risks and Environmental Justice

DepartmentSociology
Module TitleGlobal Mobility, Risks and Environmental Justice
Module CodeSC6112-20SemesterOne
Study Hours17 contact/68 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionThe increasing connectivity of the world today has a huge impact on both individuals and the natural world - our everyday lives are only possible because of the mobility of resources and products from across the globe. That of course means that our lives also have a potentially huge impact at a distance. We are increasingly aware of how human action is leading to problems such as deforestation, pollution, loss of biodiversity and even climate change. This module looks at ways we can engage with, and understand human impacts on natural environments on a global scale.
Weekly CalendarWk 1. Everyday Mobilities: the widespread impact of living in a global world. Wk 3 Back to nature: Constructing and Contesting the Environment Wk 5 Risk Society: Are the new risks we face changing the world? Wk 7 Environmental Racism and Justice Wk 9 Resource Curse: Risks, Inequalities and Fragile States Wk 11 Climate Change and Contestation: Who faces the consequences?
BibliographyBeck, U. (2009) World at Risk. Cambridge: Polity Press Carmin, J & Agyeman, J ( 2011) Environmental Inequalities Beyond Borders. London: MIT Press. Giddens, A. (2009) The Politics of Climate Change. Cambridge: Polity. Hannigan, J. (2012) Disasters Without Borders. Cambridge: Polity. Larsen, J, Urry, J & Axhousen (2006) Mobilities Networks Geographies Ashgate (Electronic Resource) Urry J. (2007) Mobilities. Cambridge: Polity Urry, J. (2011) Climate Change and Society. Cambridge: Polity Walker (2012) Environmental Justice. London: Routledge
AssessmentCase Study 2 500 words, examining the localised environmental impacts of global mobility

Module

Semester 2

SC5001-40 - Sociology: Perspectives and Debates

DepartmentSociology
Module TitleSociology: Perspectives and Debates
Module CodeSC5001-40SemesterTwo
Study Hours42 contact/180 independentCredits20
Module DescriptionThis module looks at some key sociological debates about areas of contemporary life. In the second semester we look at arguments about choice and freedom in our private lives, specifically the way we conduct relationships and develop 'body projects'. We also look at the role of consumerism in the world today.
Weekly CalendarNew Currents: Debates about individual agency and private lives Wk 13: Social change, sociological change: the breaking up of society/Mapping exercise: Key social changes in the second half of the 20th century, tracing effects on public and private spheres Debate: have individuals been liberated by change at the end of the 20th century? Wk 14: The gendered self: feminisms critical voices/Evaluating the impact of feminism/Map social changes that are rooted in feminism In groups a] evaluate different definitions of patriarchy in relation to a number of contemporary issues Debate: Should sociology be concerned with private lives? Wk 15: The self struggles with habitus/In groups prepare a definition of ‘habitus’ Discussion: Is class today more about taste and lifestyle than work? Using popular reality TV shows (Chelsea, Geordie Shore etc.) we investigate hierarchy in the UK today. Is appearance still important in classifying our position and status in society? Wk 16: Postmodern selves: bodies without organs/Using data on cosmetic surgery in the UK in groups clarify, describe and evaluate arguments about body projects. Are those who use surgery exercising agency? Wk 17: The disciplined self: post-structuralist bodies/In groups document a typical day in the life of… list regimens, forms of discipline and expert discourses that shape that day. Class discussion: should we take this argument about power seriously? Wk 18: University Reading Week Wk 19: Employability and creating a positive profile /How to present your strengths and experience to employers and also develop the cv. Section 4: Sociology beyond Society: Debates about consumption? Wk 20: A globalising world and a globalising sociology/Brainstorm the key areas of social change associated with globalisation. How are everyday lives affected by globalising processes? Debate: Do we need a sociology beyond society? Wk 21: Globalization of Nothing: Mcdonaldised rationalities/Clarify Ritzer’s description of Mcdonaldisation/Look for continuity with classical theory/List strengths/weaknesses Debate: Is your education Mcdonaldised? Wk 22:Postmodern consumers: liquid dreams/Postmodern consumers and ‘Disneyfication’: Using the Disney website and various cultural artefacts, examine dedifferentiation and seduction – you will be encouraged to bring in anecdotal material. Class Debate: Are we seduced by Disney? Wk 23: Risk Society and the complexity of consuming: the car. Group work: Develop a description of the social/environmental consequence of car usage and give a poster presentation. Wk 24: New Marxisms and New social movements: challenging consumers/Examine the sources of our own clothing in class and look at social relations of production using NGO websites. How valid are Marxist critiques of Ritzer?
BibliographyBauman, Z. (2004) Liquid Love Cambridge: Polity Press. Beck, U. & Beck-Gernsheim, E. (2001) Individualization, London: Sage. Cregan, K. (2006) The Sociology of the Body , London: Sage (Electronic resource) Bourdieu, P. (2001) Masculine Domination, Cambridge: Polity Dillon, M. (2010) Introduction to Sociological Theory Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell. Giddens, A. (1993) The Transformation of Intimacy, Cambridge: Polity Press Howson, A. (2013) The Body and Society, Cambridge: Polity McRobbie, A. (2009) The Aftermath of Feminism London: Sage Ritzer, G (2008) The MacDonaldisation of Society Thousand Oaks: Pine Forge Press Turner, B (2012) Handbook of Body Studies London: Routledge (Electronic book)
AssessmentEssay 2500 words

SC5003-20 - Criminology and Criminal Justice

DepartmentSociology
Module TitleCriminology and Criminal Justice
Module CodeSC5003-20SemesterTwo
Study Hours28 contact/80 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionThis module examines key debates in criminology and criminal justice from a sociological perspective. You will explore concepts, theories and methods of researching crime and criminality, the social dimensions of the crime debate and central problems in the policy and legal responses to crime. You will also consider questions such as how do activities become defined as criminal? In what ways do culture and the media inform our understanding of the problem of crime? How are people punished? To what extent is the process of criminal justice influenced by politics?
Weekly CalendarSocial dimensions of crime – topics include the relationship between crime and the following institutions: media, youth, race and ethnicity, class and health. Criminal justice and policy – topics include the politics and process of criminal justice, policing, crime prevention, the treatment of victims, punishment and the penal system, and offender management.
BibliographyHale, C. et al (2013) Criminology. Oxford, Oxford UP. Additional recommended reading: Carrabine, E. et al (2008) Criminology: A Sociological Introduction. Routledge. Knepper, P. (2007) Criminology and Social Policy. Sage. Maguire, M. et al (eds) (2012) The Oxford Handbook of Criminology. Oxford, Oxford UP. Newburn, T. (2012) Criminology. Willan Publishing
AssessmentPresentation (80%); Peer Evaluation (20%)

SC6008-20 - Gender: Mind, Body and Cultures

DepartmentSociology
Module TitleGender: Mind, Body and Cultures
Module CodeSC6008-20SemesterTwo
Study Hours21 contact/87 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionThis module critically examines the construction of gender, and students will acquire the knowledge and skills to assess the nature of gender relations and inequalities within contemporary societies both here in the UK and globally. It provides students with the opportunity to consider how gender impacts on their own
Weekly CalendarFeminism and Feminist theory. International Feminism(s): Muslim Feminism and the Veil. Eco-Feminism. Sexuality. Masculinity and men’s studies. Gender in the Global labour market. Gender and Violence in an international context.
BibliographyConnell, R. (2009) Gender, Cambridge: Polity. Bradley, H. (2013) Gender, Cambridge: Polity. Mac an Ghaill, M., & Haywood, C. (2007).Gender, Culture and Society. Contemporary Femininities and Masculinities. Basingstoke: Palgrave MacMillan. Beasley, C. (2005) Gender and Sexuality, London: Sage.
AssessmentEssay

SC6010-20 - Migration, Diversity and Racism

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DepartmentSociology
Module TitleMigration, Diversity and Racism
Module CodeSC6010-20SemesterTwo
Study Hours21 contact/87 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionThis module confronts the social impacts of migration, ethnic diversity and racism. We begin by critically evaluating key concepts and sociological theories, including debates about what counts as racism, ideas about ‘whiteness’ as a form of domination and arguments about how multicultural societies should be managed. We then consider the importance of understanding how historical events continue to shape the contemporary world (including slavery, colonialism and post-war migrations). After considering developments in law and policy, we then turn our attention to topics that enable us to review the influence that ethnicity and racism can have on life-chances. We consider areas such as health, education and the debates over ‘Islamophobia’.
Weekly CalendarSociological viewpoints on race and ethnicity, including ‘Whiteness’ studies. Managing multicultural societies: politics, identities, laws and policies. Debates about experiences of inequality: health, education and Islamophobia.
BibliographyGarner, S. (2010) Racisms. Sage. Bloch, A. and Solomos, J. (eds) (2010) Race and Ethnicity in the 21st Century. Palgrave Macmillan. Back, L. and Solomos, J. (eds) (2007) Theories of Race and Racism - A Reader (2nd ed). Routledge. Brown, M. and Miles, R. (2003) Racism. Routledge. McGhee, D. (2008) The End of Multiculturalism? Terrorism, Integration and Human Rights. OUP.
AssessmentExam

SC6110-20 - Individuals, Health and Society

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DepartmentSociology
Module TitleIndividuals, Health and Society
Module CodeSC6110-20SemesterTwo
Study Hours21 contact/87 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionThis module offers an overview of the research literature produced by sociologists who want to understand more about health and illness. In rich countries health care consumes a vast amount of public and private spending, and provides employment for millions. ‘Health’ is also of huge cultural and symbolic significance. Some commentators have claimed that in developed societies we live in a ‘health-obsessed’ culture where anxieties about health are out of all proportion to the risks we encounter. In poorer parts of the world, however, global health inequalities are wide and growing. The module aims to show the value and importance of a sociological approach to health and illness; this means the ability to apply key sociological concepts to the arena of health and health care. The core idea is that health and illness is socially patterned and health is socially as constructed as well as biologically-based.
Weekly CalendarTypical syllabus content includes: health and patterns of health and illness, infectious disease and the public health tradition; effectiveness and efficiency of modern medicine; changing concepts of health and the challenges to medicine; chronic illness and its consequences; the impact of the illness burden on health care systems; global perspectives on health inequalities, health care rationing; sociological perspectives on health services and their management.
BibliographySarah Nettleton (2006) The Sociology of Health and Illness. Polity Press Barry, A and Chris Yuill (2008) Understanding the Sociology of Health: An Introduction (2nd edition). Sage. Saks, M and Judith Allsop (2007) Researching Health. Sage. Scambler G (ed) (2005) Medical Sociology: Major Themes in Health and Social Welfare (4 vols). Routledge. Wainwright D (ed) (2008) A Sociology of Health. Sage.
AssessmentExam

SC6112-20 - Global Mobility, Risks and Environmental Justice

DepartmentSociology
Module TitleGlobal Mobility, Risks and Environmental Justice
Module CodeSC6112-20SemesterTwo
Study Hours21 contact/87 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionThis module explores a range of issues confronting people around the world at the beginning of the twenty first century. Globalisation has become part of everyday experience. Increasing mobility and communications technologies have made it possible for markets, ideas, media and populations to move more freely over boundaries that used to constrain our experience. Many forms of activism are opening up whether through thoughtful consumption or membership of a social movement. There is consensus that there is an urgent need to address environmental issues, but there are no simple solutions. This module looks at social responses to global environmental issues, from individual (should we recycle, fly, or buy fair-trade?); to global institutions (what is sustainability?; what will be the consequences of carbon-trading?).
Weekly CalendarWe will look at the impact of global markets, tourism and consumption on the environment, and the ways that the meaning of ‘nature’ is being transformed. We will look at responses to environmental issues at individual, local, national and global levels. This section will examine contestation between the different social actors definitions of and solutions to climate change.
BibliographyBeck, U. (2009) World at Risk. Cambridge: Polity. King, L. and McCarthy Aurifeille, D. (2013) Environmental Sociology: From Analysis to Action. Global Environmental Politics London: Rowman and Littlefield Bauman,Z (2007) Consuming Life. Cambridge: Polity Press. Carmin, J. and Agyeman, J. (eds) (2011) Environmental Inequalities Beyond Borders: Local Perspectives on Global Injustices. Massachusetts: MIT Press. Giddens, A. (2009) The Politics of Climate Change. Cambridge Polity. Hannigan, J. (2013) Disasters without Borders: The International Politics of Natural Disasters. Cambridge: Polity. Ritzer, G. (2011) Globalization: The Essentials. Chichester: Wiley Blackwell. Urry, J (2011) Climate Change and Society. Cambridge: Polity. Yearley, S. (2005) Cultures of Environmentalism. Basingstoke Palgrave Macmillan.
AssessmentProject Case Study

SC6113-20 - Globalisation and Work

DepartmentSociology/Business
Module TitleGlobalisation and Work
Module CodeSC6331-20SemesterTwo
Study Hours21 contact/87 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionThe aim of this module is to examine how processes of globalization affect the world of work, working lives and working relationships. The focus is on multinational corporations, in order to examine how they have shaped production, consumption and workplaces in ways that promote globalization. Examples of multinationals that have successfully transitioned from local to global production will be considered – including for example, Apple, Google, Shell and Tata – in order to identify key features of multinational corporations. Shifts in global supply chains and ‘off-shore’ initiatives will be explored with a specific focus on work in factories and call centres. How workers and work identities are affected by changes in the organisation (and locations) of production will be central to this module. In addition, the changing roles of men and women in international labour markets will be examined; and how particular occupations and sectors – for example, care work – are being transformed by migration, which in turn affects gender relations within families and households. Finally, the controversial topics of child labour and sweatshops will be addressed using examples of leading UK high-street retailers and members of the Ethical Trading Initiative which have been subject to scrutiny regarding labour abuses within their global supply chains. The question of whether globalization promotes a ‘race to the bottom’ in terms of labour standards will be discussed and the impact of international regulations and agreements on corporate practices and codes of conduct examined. How national governments respond to multinational corporations and greater capital mobility is another critical question for this module.
Weekly CalendarTypical content includes: 1) Theoretical and historical perspectives on Globalization and Capitalism 2) Multinational Corporations: the instigators and beneficiaries of globalization 3) How is Globalization Transforming Work and the Employment Relationship? 4) Labour Market Polarization 5) Post-industrial jobs
BibliographyDicken, P. (2005) Global Shift: Reshaping the Global Economic Map in the 21st Century. Sage. Smith, M.P. and Favell, A. (2006) The Human Face of Global Mobility. Transaction. Rivoli, P. (2005) The Travels of a T-shirt in the Global Economy. Wiley. Sassen, S. (2007) A Sociology of Globalization. London; New York: W.W. Norton & Co. Sklair, L (2002) Globalization, Capitalism and its Alternatives. Oxford University Press. Stiglitz, J.E. (2007) Making Globalization Work. London; New York: W.W. Norton & Co.
AssessmentEssay (100%)

Open Modules

Semester 1

OM4004-20 - Peace and Conflict

DepartmentN/A
Module TitlePeace and Conflict
Module CodeOM4004-20SemesterOne
Study Hours22 contact/63 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionThe aim of this module is to support you to develop the knowledge and skills that you need to understand and make positive contributions to debate and discussion around peace and violent conflict in today’s society and from an historical perspective. The module also develops transferable skills that will help you to develop as a professional, who may go onto work in this field, including in humanitarian relief, international development, peacebuilding, social entrepreneurship and international affairs. We do this by exploring theoretical and cultural analyses and interpretations of violent conflict, by looking at contemporary practices of making and keeping peace and by exploring the roles and challenges that different actors working in this field face. We will give you opportunities to interpret and respond to these issues creatively and to engage with people who are working actively in this field. You will have the opportunity to do independent research in an area you are particularly interested in and to work with your peers to produce your own responses to the issues that we discuss.
Weekly Calendar1.Thinking about peace 2. Conflict and types of violence 3. Visiting speaker on human rights 4. Theoretical framework 1: Clash of civilizations 5. Theoretical framework 2: Critical conflict theory 6. Theoretical framework 3: Economic causes of conflict 7. Peacebuilding and justice initiatives 8. Assignment 1 tutorials 9. Field trip 10. The nature of conflict
BibliographyReadings are made available weekly on Minerva, our VLE
AssessmentEssay plan (20% - marked for study abroad students only but completed by all), Essay 80%

OM4006-20 - Discovering Science

DepartmentN/A
Module TitleDiscovering Science
Module CodeOM-4006-20SemesterOne
Study Hours44 contact/130 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionThis module is designed to provide you will the necessary tools to understand and communicate scientific issues that affect the modern world. The module will start by asking why we need science, and exploring the history and philosophy of science as a way of explaining its power to help understand the world. In learning about and practising the scientific method, you will gain a valuable insight into the way science works and gain skills in being able to critically evaluate information and recognise different strengths of evidence. You will also gain practical experience in presenting scientific issues and in engaging people to enhance the public understanding of science. These themes will be explored by drawing from a wide range of contemporary issues, e.g. health scares; climate change; the science in science fiction, the value of brain training; validity of nutritional and medical claims By the end of this module, you will have gained an awareness of the practical application of the scientific method, uses and abuses of science, the importance of critical analysis of evidence, and have improved your abilities to research and communicate information to a non-specialist audience.
Weekly CalendarBad Science; Why we need science?; Why science communication is important; Scientific thinking; Climate Change; Seeing through data; Science Publishing; Neuroscience and misrepresentation; Psychology and the media; Delivering Science - Public engagement; Student Seminars on selected topics.
BibliographyGoldacre, B. (2009) Bad Science. Harper Perennial. Welcome Trust (2006) Engaging Science: Thoughts, Deeds, Analysis and Action. Cottrell, S. (2011) Critical thinking skills 2nd ed. Palgrave Knisely, K (2013) A Student Handbook for Writing in Biology, 4e. WH Freeman. Ed Yong - Not Exactly Rocket Science: http://phenomena.nationalgeographic.com/blog/not-exactly-rocket-science/ Guardian science network: http://www.guardian.co.uk/science-blogs Dorothy Bishop’s blog: http://deevybee.blogspot.co.uk/
AssessmentGroup presentation on a science-related current issue (60%), Individual science paper outlining and justifying the basis for a science demonstration project (40%)

OM5005-20 - Environmental Sustainability

DepartmentN/A
Module TitleEnvironmental Sustainability
Module CodeOM5005-20SemesterOne
Study Hours22 contact/63 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionThis module will enable you to act as a ‘green professional’ with skills to recognise, investigate and minimise a range of environmental problems such as air and water pollution, waste disposal, decline in biodiversity, energy use and carbon emissions, resource consumption, transport impacts, and environmental risks. You will also examine factors that influence businesses and organisations. In addition, you’ll explore the role of tools that are available to provide a framework for minimising environmental impacts.
Weekly CalendarIntroduction to environmental sustainability; Travel Impact Assessment Exercise; Pollution – Sources; Sinks and ecotoxicology; EMS Aspects and Impacts; Water Use Audit; Water Quality including Survey; Environmental Review; Baseline and Auditing; Air Pollution Effects and Monitoring; Carbon; Energy and environmental issues; Minimising energy use and energy audit; Visit to Carymoor – Wastes Management; Alternative energy; Audit of electricity use and space heating; Visit to Earth Science Centre and Quarry Site.
BibliographyBrady, J., Ebbage, A., & Lunn, R (Eds) (2011) Environmental Management in Organizations: The IEMA Handbook. London, Taylor & Francis. Bell, S & McGillivray, D (2013) Environmental Law. (8th Ed.) Oxford, Oxford University Press. Doppelt, B (2009) Leading Change Toward Sustainability: A Change-Management Guide for Business, Government and Civil Society, Sheffield: Greenleaf
AssessmentInterpretative Test (40%), Environmental Impacts Review (60%)

Semester 2

OM4002-40 - Sustainability in Life and Work

DepartmentN/A
Module TitleSustainability in Life and Work
Module CodeOM4002-40SemesterTwo
Study Hours56 contact/166 independentCredits20
Module DescriptionIn this module, you will gain an understanding of the various definitions and uses of the term sustainability: from the economic, environmental and social impacts of climate change and energy intensive lifestyles and business practice, ethics, consumer culture and food supply. You will also gain an appreciation of the opportunities for graduates with an understanding of low- and post-carbon businesses and markets.
Weekly CalendarTypical content includes: defining and measuring sustainability; ethics and sustainability; managing transitions; greening business; consumer culture; ecology and biodiversity; food supply and security; working in the sustainability ‘industry’; social and environmental justice; sustainability in education; eco-tourism and sustainable travel.
BibliographyElliot, J (2006) An Introduction to Sustainable Development, London: Routledge Villiers-Stuart, P. and Stibbe, A (eds) The Handbook of Sustainability Literacy, free, full download available at http://www.sustainability-literacy.org/multimedia.html TED Talks: www.ted.com
AssessmentProject (80%) and Presentation (20%)

OM4007-20 - Introduction to Computing

DepartmentComputer Science
Module TitleIntroduction to Computing
Module CodeOM4007-20SemesterTwo
Study HoursTBCCredits10
Module DescriptionThis module aims to introduce the fundamentals of computer processes. We will provide a solid platform from which you can begin to learn programming or to go on to more advanced aspects such as cloud computing. There are three fundamental aspects to computing: hardware; software; and communications. The module will introduce all three, by providing both a theoretical and a practical grounding. At the heart of the computer is a Central Processing Unit or CPU. The structure, components and functions of the CPU will be explored in detail, leading to an understanding of how the hardware operates. This is controlled by software, and in particular the operating system (such as Windows, MacOS, Linux, iOS or Android). The module will explore the processes, file systems, memory management, and many other features that are typical of operating systems. Finally, network communications are of crucial importance in the internet age. The module will look at networks from both a theoretical and practical viewpoint, exploring areas such as: · network architectures, data communication systems, · transmission technologies, internet and mobile technologies.
Weekly CalendarTBC
BibliographyTBC.
AssessmentTBC

OM5005-20 - Environmental Sustainability

DepartmentN/A
Module TitleEnvironmental Sustainability
Module CodeOM5005-20SemesterTwo
Study Hours28 contact/80 independentCredits10
Module DescriptionThis module will enable you to act as a ‘green professional’ with skills to recognise, investigate and minimise a range of environmental problems such as air and water pollution, waste disposal, decline in biodiversity, energy use and carbon emissions, resource consumption, transport impacts, and environmental risks. You will also examine influences on individual behaviour and choice within regard to the environment. In addition, you’ll explore the role of tools that are available for promoting environmental sustainability.
Weekly CalendarWaste Management; Principles of pollution control; Alternative energy sources workshop; Waste and recycling audit; Applications of Environmental Sustainability in the Construction and Food Industries; Risk Management; Visit to Manufacturing Industry - Wyke Farms - Cheese Manufacturer and Crown Pet Food (Pet food company); Ecosystem Services; How to promote change in people’s behaviour; Contaminated Land; Soil testing for pollutants.
BibliographyBrady, J., Ebbage, A., & Lunn, R (Eds) (2011) Environmental Management in Organizations: The IEMA Handbook. London, Taylor & Francis. Bell, S & McGillivray, D (2013) Environmental Law. (8th Ed.) Oxford, Oxford University Press. Doppelt, B (2009) Leading Change Toward Sustainability: A Change-Management.
AssessmentInterpretative Test based on Project Work (40%), Promotional Activity (Group work) 60%