Study and career – Bath Spa University

Study and career

Get ready for your degree!

Your studies may be very different than how you've learned before, but we're here to help you thrive when you get here! Find out how to access Library resources, discover independent learning, and find out more about our Careers services on this page.

Undergraduate course preparation materials

Below you'll find tips from your course tutors, to help you prepare for your studies!

Acting

You might like to watch...

Our course involves interpreting texts and creating new work. Watching lots of theatre, film and television are essential ways to familiarise yourself with current practices and new trends in the discipline and in industry. We'll expect you to know what is happening in the world around you and to be just as curious about the arts in general. Visit galleries when they open, and listen to music and radio. The range of possibilities for acting are broader than you think.

Keep an eye on The Guardian which regularly offers links to online productions and the latest theatre reviews. Have a look at The Stage for what’s going on in the industry. Listen to The Royal Court Playwright’s Podcast and check out the following venues, which also offer free access to online performances:

BBC iPlayerWhat's On Stage and Actors on Actors are also useful resources. 

You might like to read...

You can start by looking at our module reading lists and by reading plays, but to be extra prepared read:

  • Hagen, U. (2008) Respect For Acting. London: John Wiley & Sons (we'll be referring to this publication in your Introduction to Acting Processes module).
  • Brown, J R. (ed.) (1995) The Oxford Illustrated History of the Theatre. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
  • Merlin, B. (2014) The Complete Stanislavsky Toolkit. London: Nick Hern Books.
  • Chekhov, M. (2002) To the Actor: On the Technique of Acting. London and New York: Routledge.
  • Donnellan, D. (2005) The Actor and the Target. London: Nick Hern Books.
  • Hodge, A. (ed) (2010) Actor Training. London and New York: Routledge.
  • Lecoq, J. The Moving Body: Teaching Creative Theatre. London and New York: Methuen Drama.

Tips from your tutors...

"Get a headstart on understanding your industry: research as many theatre companies and playwrights as possible. National Theatre Live will be a good indication of where to start. Watch as many online theatre productions and films as you can. Can you identify your preferred actors? What is it about their work that you find particularly fascinating? Start keeping all your notes in a personal journal."

Anything else?

Wondering what to wear to your teaching sessions? We recommend black loose trousers, tracksuit bottoms or leggings, and a black t-shirt. A water bottle is essential.

Biology (all pathways)

You might like to listen to...

Popular BBC Radio 4 science programme The Infinite Monkey Cage offers a lot of easily accessible scientific information and will probably make you laugh!

You might like to read...

This free open source Biology book gives a good idea of the level expected for first year, and the introductory Chapters (1 and 2) should give you an introduction or review of the biological world. You might also find it useful to read our Subject Newsletter, 'A Bite of Bio' to see what our students get up to.

You may want to follow...

Tips from your tutors...

"You'll start to become a professional scientist; a big part of that is writing appropriately and following conventions, whilst making your work clear and impactful as well as engaging. This can be quite a challenge, but a good tip is to start reading published scientific literature, perhaps using a public search engine such as Google Scholar in the first instance. Think of a topic you're interested in and have a search to see what is out there on it. Take note of the writing style and structures as you read; this will help you develop your own writing skills."

Business and Management (all pathways)

You might like to listen to...

Start listening to podcasts from the BBC's Rethink: How the world should change after the coronavirus pandemic. In this, leading thinkers from across the globe give us their route maps to a better tomorrow.

You could also check out some of the business-related TED talks available online, and other relevant programmes such as Radio 4's In Business and More or Less.

You might like to read...

Have a look at any general Business and Management textbooks.

It's important to be up-to-date with current affairs, so keep up with business news. How are businesses adapting to a changing business environment? Check out:

You might like to follow... 

Start to follow any business leaders that you respect. Think about the values they hold and how they run their businesses. You can also check out what we're up to here at Bath Business School #bathbusinessschool.

Tips from your tutors...

"Talk to friends and family about their working life. Build a picture of how different orgaisations operate, what drives innovation and how they deal with and react to real-world problems (look for news stories about the need for change).

You could also line up some work/volunteering; this will improve rapid understanding of the course content and will help you in informed debate with peers.

The degree will allow you to take specialist pathways, so try to get a feel for the broad topic areas which include creativity, business ethics, economics and change management in the business environment – there are bound to be specific areas of business that fuel your passion.

It’s worth thinking about areas you’d like to explore more deeply and consider directions your career can go in. Of course, this can all change as you study and think more holistically, but considering your options now can help you make better decisions when it comes to choosing elective modules."

Anything else?

Be open to change!

Comedy

You might like to watch...

The British Comedy Guide is a brilliant resource that gives a detailed overview of what's happening across the industry including a guide to scheduled TV and live events. In your first year there will be a focus on sketch comedy, so do have a look at what's out there. Gbemisola Ikumelo's Brain In Gear was first aired as a comedy short and has since been commissioned as a Sitcom series on BBC 2.

You might like to read...

Chortle is another great comedy resource with lots of features to explore. Visit Chris Head's website to find out more about one of your key tutors from a writing perspective, and check out his blog with great lessons on stand up comedy.

People to follow

Tips from your tutors...

"Watch as much comedy as possible and carry around a notebook to jot down comedic ideas as and when they arise. Come with an open mind, expect to fall down and don’t judge your progress against that of others."

Commercial Music

You might like to read...

Have a look at our Alumni blog to see what recent graduates are up to in the music industry. 

There's a lot happening in our industry right now; have a look at the following websites to keep up to date with these events:

You might like to follow...

Please check out our Instagram to get a taste of life on Commercial Music:

Tips from your tutors...

"You'll have plenty of time to meet and get to know your fellow students during your Welcome Weeks. There'll be an opportunity during the Welcome Weeks for you to show your fellow students your musical skills and talk about your influences and the music you want to make. Prepare something that you'd like to play and think about the things you want the group to know about you and your music. Have a think about the type of music projects you want to get involved in – you can be as free and creative as you like, so this might be an opportunity to expand your horizons and try something new."

Anything else?

If you're unsure about technical equipment you might need on the course – don't worry. We'll be discussing this in the Welcome Talk and giving you advice to suit your budget. To get you started, a pair of headphones and an external hard drive (1tb) are the essentials.

Computing

You might like to try...

If you want to engage in something practical before starting university, try working your way through the C++ Codecademy course or the platform’s Web Development Career Path. Another fun way of entering computing is through tinkering with Arduino microcontrollers. If you have some free time, consider purchasing an Arduino Starter Kit (or a third party equivalent) from Amazon and following tutorials at Arduino.cc.

You might like to read...

Keeping up to date with developments in technology is a good habit to maintain across the course. We recommend bookmarking and taking a look at such websites as Tech Crunch, WiredTech Radar and the British Computer Society. Worthwhile also checking out for an understanding of how computing has developed over the years is the Computer History Museum’s Timeline of Computer History.

Tips from your tutors...

"BSc (Hons) Computing is a wide-ranging and varied course that challenges you on a technical, design and academic level. You’ll get the most from your time with us if you're curious, active in sessions, and keen to push yourself to produce high quality digital work. Try also listing what you want to achieve while studying at university, focusing not only on practical skills but also personal qualities that you’d like to develop. We look forward to meeting and working with you."

Creative Arts Practice

You might like to watch...

Watch TateShots short films on YouTube (but we're not expecting you to watch all 547!). Make a note of interesting artists and work you've discovered.

You might like to read...

  • Ways of Seeing by John Berger
  • Design as Art by Bruno Munari

You might like to follow...

Tips from your tutors...

"Come with an open mind, a willingess to try new ways of working. Be prepared to take creative risks. Start to embrace accidents and mistakes. Immerse yourself in other cultural fields including literature, music and cinema. Look at cultures outside your own. Be kind to yourself."

Anything else?

Complete the Summer Project that you've been sent. Enjoy!

Creative Computing (all pathways)

You might like to try...

If you want to engage in something practical before starting university, try working your way through the C++ Codecademy course or the platform’s Web Development Career Path. Gaming pathway students can develop a simple top-down narrative game using the Bitsy Editor, while animation pathway students can create a 30-second piece of stop motion animation using a smartphone camera and any video editing package.

You might like to watch...

There's lots of excellent content online relating to animation, gaming, web technologies, and digital creativity more generally. We recommend the YouTube channel Extra Credits for bitesize perspectives on game theory, Aardman’s website for an appreciation of the expressive range of animation, and Google’s Chrome Experiments for a flavour of how people are treating the web as a creative space. You can also find inspiration by reviewing sketches made using the open-source editor Processing. The website features many interactive examples that collide computing and creativity.

You might like to read...

Keeping up to date with developments in technology is a good habit to maintain across the course. We recommend bookmarking and taking a look at such websites as Tech CrunchWiredTech Radar and the British Computer Society. Worthwhile also checking out for an understanding of how computing has developed over the years is the Computer History Museum’s Timeline of Computer History.

Tips from your tutors...

"BSc (Hons) Creative Computing is a wide-ranging and varied course that challenges you on a creative, technical and academic level. You’ll get the most from your time with us if you're curious, active in sessions, and keen to push yourself to produce high quality digital work. Try also listing what you want to achieve while studying at university, focusing not only on practical skills but also personal qualities that you’d like to develop. We look forward to meeting and working with you."

Creative Media

You might like to watch...

You might like to try…

You might like to read...

  • Dormehl, L. (2016). Thinking Machines: The Inside Story of AI: WH Allen.
  • Gauntlett, D. (2018). Making is Connecting: Polity Press.
  • Kiberd, R. (2021). The Disconnect: A Personal Journey Through the Internet: Serpent’s Tail.
  • Manovich, L. (2002). The language of new media. Mass: MIT Press.
  • Miller, C. (2014). Digital storytelling: a creator’s guide to interactive entertainment [electronic resource]. 3rd ed. London: Focal Press.
  • Nash, K. (2014). New documentary ecologies: emerging platforms, practices and discourses. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.

Also check out:

You might like to follow...

Tips from your tutors...

"Always carry around a sketchbook or tablet for writing down creative ideas for future projects. Try to watch a wider variety of films and TV series, look at the BFI player as well as websites like ThoughtMaybe. Follow artists, filmmakers and creative practitioners on Instagram and YouTube to see their latest work and get inspired.

At the start of your course, create your own personal schedule where you put aside time to work on each of your modules outside of class each week; this will allow you to progress your learning in the most effective way.

To get the most out of your course, make sure that you push yourself outside your comfort zone, taking part in workshop activities and seminar discussions and actively collaborating on group work. Also, make the most of the vast amount of material that is on offer to support your learning."

Creative Music Technology

You might like to watch...

Be inquisitive about your audio environment. Listen to the world around you and notice how sounds behave in different environments. Listen to plenty of music from a wide range of genres and notice how the music is arranged and composed. Pay attention to how sound and music is used in your favourite TV shows, computer games and other media to enhance or carry the narrative or story.

You might like to read...

Whilst it's hard to identify specific texts at this stage, take the time to find books that relate to your interests. An excellent book that covers a wide range of topics is Audio Culture: Readings in Modern Music by Cox and Warner. If you're interested in computer games then Game Sound by Karen Collins is a great introduction. If sound design is your thing, then Sound Design: The Expressive Power of Music, Voice and Sound Effects in Cinema by David Sonnenschein is a good all-rounder.

You might like to follow...

Peter Kirn’s Create Digital Music blog is an excellent resource for all things music tech – why not head over and explore his content?

Tips from your tutors...

"Becoming a great producer or sound artist takes practice and focused learning. Just like learning an instrument, or learning to drive, you need to allocate time in your day to practice. Sit with your DAW and/or audio production software/hardware and experiment with new techniques. Push yourself to move out of your comfort zone and explore the boundaries of what's possible with your tools."

Creative Writing

You might like to watch...

Look out for our guest talk on inclusivity and diversity in the cultural and creative industries. More details will be shared during Welcome Weeks!

You might like to read...

You might like to...

  • Get to know Newton Park using one of our Nature Walk maps (you'll be able to get a map during Welcome Weeks)
  • Join one of our all-year writing sessions on poetry, script, fiction and nonfiction - you'll see this listed on your Welcome Weeks timetable
  • Hear our students and staff read from their work during our Welcome Weeks.

You might like to follow...

Tips from your tutors...

"Welcome to Creative Writing at Bath Spa University! We're delighted to have you and we can't wait to get to know you. Make the most of your Welcome Weeks. We have plenty of sessions available for you to hear about the course, meet your lecturers and meet each other. We'll have a reading from current students and staff and sessions on different forms of writing for you to attend with students from other years. Jump in, make the most of it, and if you have any questions we're here to help!"

Criminology

You might like to watch...

Keep an eye on good quality news media for developments in criminal justice policy; be familiar with the main government websites:

You might like to read...

Tips from your tutors...

"Keep an open mind about what is and is not 'criminal'. Do not confuse the 'infotainment' crime documentaries provide with the reality of criminology; try to look beyond arguments about crime as 'good' and 'bad' and 'right' and 'wrong'. Perhaps you might want to consider the role of time, place and culture in making things 'criminal'."

Cyber Security

You might like to try...

Future learning has a great series of free online learning courses on cyber security. Look at their website and search for 'cyber security' to find the current courses on offer.

Tips from your tutors

"Check out the news on The Register for 30 minutes each week. Look up anything you don't understand. After three months you'll have developed a wide range and useful base of knowledge to help your future career in the cyber security world."

Dance

You might like to watch...

Watching lots of dance is one essential way to familiarise yourself with new trends in the discipline. Take a look at the Dancing Nation series currently showing on the BBC iPlayer. There are lots of interesting ideas from a diverse range of international choreographers. Keep your eye out for the work of contemporary choreographers who may be new to you.

You'll find lots of interesting works to see on the Sadler's Wells Digital Stage. Take a look at this powerful film We Want Our Bodies Back created by Breakin’ Convention Artistic Director and Sadler’s Wells Associate Artist Jonzi D.

You might like to read...

Be curious about the world around you. Read the papers, listen to music, watch films, visit galleries. Our course is highly creative in nature and we'll encourage you to draw on sources from dance and beyond to inspire your creative practice.

You can start here by reading some articles on the archive for The Creative Independent. It's a place for dancers, musicians, poets and other artists to share ideas about what's important to their practice. You can use the search function to look for things that will interest you or just browse and see what you find.

You should also start to find out as much as you can about how dancers can stay physically and psychologically healthy. Your new programme of study will be demanding and so knowing how to look after yourself is key. The Healthier Dancer Programme run by One Dance UK offers lots of interesting advice and links for people in the industry. There are lots of interesting articles, for example how to strengthen your pelvic floor. You can even sign up for their Facebook page!

You might like to start...

Building your strength, stamina and flexibility! There are also lots of online classes that will help to keep you moving over the summer. Check out the range of online classes on offer from Motionhouse Dance Theatre.

You might like to follow...

@bsu_dance on Instagram

Tips from your tutors...

"Your dance programme at Bath Spa will offer you a really exciting opportunity to grow in new and unexpected ways. Try to bring with you an open mind, your imagination and a spirit for adventure!

Try to make sure you keep moving over the summer so that your body feels ready for the physical training. Yoga, pilates, HIIT training, running and cycling can all be great supplementary activities to help keep you agile and moving."

Digital Animation

You might like to listen to...

You might like to read...

  • Design as Art by Bruno Munari

You might like to follow... 

Tips from your tutors...

"Learn to cook something simple and nutritious, and practise washing up!"

Anything else?

Draw, take photographs, look at and make short films/animations. Read about animation.

Drama

You might like to watch...

You might like to familiarise yourself with recent local and national theatre activity by having a look at:

Consider:

  • The mission of each theatre
  • Who the theatre’s target audience is
  • What you think of their programmes
  • The issues raised by the plays they present (theatrical, moral, social, political, philosophical).

Have a look at some of the shows available via the following websites (in particular the free ones):

You might like to read...

  • Andrew Haydon's chapter ‘Theatre in the 2000s’ in Rebellato, D. (2013) Modern British Playwriting 2000-2009, London Bloomsbury

Andrew Haydon says "theatre, like a nation’s press, is the sound of a culture talking to itself’ (p41). Consider what sort of conversations are going on about the world in the theatre that you have seen.

Tips from your tutors...

"Familiarise yourself with the work of the Royal Court. The Royal Court Theatre is considered the most important theatre in the UK for new writing, and many of the plays that have had a particular national impact have premiered there over the last few decades.

The Royal Court says that its writers are 'at the forefront of creating restless, alert, provocative theatre about now'."

Anything else?

Contact the Drama Subject Leader r.connolly@bathspa.ac.uk or musicandperformanceadmin@bathspa.ac.uk if you have any questions about your course.

Early Childhood Studies

You might like to watch...

Watch some CBeebies shows. You could consider some of these questions:

  • How are young children depicted?
  • How are young children and their families encouraged to join in, and to respond to the programmes?
  • How are they encouraged to be imaginative and to explore their emotions?
  • How is everyday life depicted?
  • To what extent is the diversity of our society represented?

You might like to read...

  • Trodd, L. (ed) The Early Years Handbook for Students and Practitioners: An Essential Guide for the Foundation Degree and Levels 4 and 5. Abingdon: Routledge

You might like to follow... 

@ECSDNetwork focuses on students studying Early Childhood Studies. You could also look at the Education Policy Institute Early Years publications for a current picture of early childhood services in the UK.

Tips from your tutors...

"Over the summer, reflect upon situations where you see young children (up to eight years old) and what they are engaged with – for example, in the park, with their family, with friends out on shopping trips, at childcare or a holiday club, using digital technology.

Tune in to how young children seem to be experiencing these situations and to your own responses. Follow the news with a focus on early childhood provision (such as nurseries, childminders and schools) to find out what the situation is for these providers based on Covid-19 arrangements."

Education: Primary and Early Years

You might like to listen to...

Start listening to education podcasts, like ones produced by the TES (Times Educational Supplement). Think about how the Covid-19 pandemic has impacted schools and schooling.

We've educated children remotely at home at different times over the past year. What has been learned, and how might this influence children's education in the future?

You might like to read...

  • C. Simon and S. Ward (ed.) (2020) A Student's Guide to Education Studies. Fourth edition. Oxford: Routledge. 

You might like to follow... 

Many of our own Bath Spa staff have published in education, such as Professor Martin Levinson and Dr Kendra McMahon.

Tips from your tutors...

"Start reflecting on your own experiences of education. What was fulfilling and what would you like to change if you could?

Ask friends and family to tell you about their recollections of school. What do they remember vividly and how has their education influenced their life choices?

It is interesting to gather views from different generations too, to see how attitudes towards education have changed over time."

Education Secondary

You might like to listen to...

Start listening to education podcasts, like ones produced by the TES (Times Educational Supplement). Think about how the Covid-19 pandemic has impacted schools and schooling.

We've educated children remotely at home over the last year. What has been learned, and how might this influence children's education in the future?

You might like to read...

C. Simon and S. Ward (ed.) (2020) A Student's Guide to Education Studies. Fourth edition. Oxford: Routledge. 

You might like to follow... 

Many of our own Bath Spa staff have published in education, such as Professor Martin Levinson and Dr Kendra McMahon.

Tips from your tutors...

"Start reflecting on your own experiences of education. What was fulfilling and what would you like to change if you could?

Ask friends and family to tell you about their recollections of school. What do they remember vividly and how has their education influenced their life choices?

It's interesting to gather views from different generations too, to see how attitudes towards education have changed over time."

Education Studies

You might like to watch...

Reflect on your own experiences of education, including school and other activities. You might also have some work experience in an education setting. Think about experiences that have been fulfilling, and about aspects of education you might like to change. You could also explore websites such as the Department for Education and blogs such as The Conversation.

You might like to read... 

  • C. Simon and S. Ward (ed.) (2020) A Student's Guide to Education Studies. Fourth edition. Oxford: Routledge.

You could also keep up-to-date with the latest news in education, for example, check out The Guardian Education.

You might like to follow... 

Many of our own Bath Spa staff have published in education, such as Professor Martin Levinson and Dr Ben Simmons.

Anything else?

Keep a journal and write notes about what you read.

Educational Psychology

You might like to watch...

Psychology is a fascinating subject so you're spoiled for choice. You may enjoy YouTube’s Mind Field and Vsauce.

The BBC has some great offerings including:

Some episodes of the Netflix documentary Babies is available on YouTube. These episodes are on babies and language, the effect of caregiving, social interaction and stress, crawlingfirst steps and sleep.

You might like to listen to...

We also love a good podcast in Psychology so check out Scienceish, Hidden Brain60 Second Mind and Brain Science.

If you're interested in thinking about child development and the impact it may have on educational outcomes and adult life, check out these talks on baby brain development, children and language, challenging behaviour, ADHD, autism, mind mindednessstress at school and emotional intelligence.

You might like to read...

Of course, our reading lists are a great place to start but you could explore all of psychology through the freely available NOBA collection.

For those looking to get a head start on statistics, Understanding and using statistics in psychology: A practical introduction is friendly and well written.

For those looking for popular press material, check out one of our own academic’s work in Popular Science or Newsweek.

For those looking for a great summer book, I would recommend The Great Pretender: The Undercover Mission that Changed our Understanding of Madness, Phantoms in the Brain: Human Nature and the Architecture of the Mind, or a book by one of our very own, Lost in a Good Game: Why we play video games and what they can do for us.

If you're interested in a personal account of Autism together with scientific insight I would recommend The Autistic Brain by Professor Temple Grandin.

You might like to follow...

Our course is accredited by @BPSOfficial. It's also worth following @ExpPsychSoc, @RCPsych@APA and our very own @BSUHealCognit.

Tips from your tutors

"You're about to begin your life as a scientist of human behaviour and the mind. The more you can read and explore across the wide range of topics covered within Psychology, the more you are likely to find unexpected delights. It's also worth taking a look at the scientific literature to get a sense of how it is written and conducted, as you begin your journey as a researcher. The British Journal of Educational Psychology and Educational Psychology: An International Journal of Experimental Educational Psychology have some interesting articles freely accessible and would be a great place to start."

English Literature

You might like to listen to...

Give your eyes a rest and listen to some great discussions about ideas, books, and writers: there are plenty of literature-related episodes of the BBC's landmark In Our Time series – try exploring the Culture list. If you like Shakespeare there are some unusual angles on his work from the Folger Library

We also really like the podcasts Literary Friction and Samira Ahmed's How I Found My Voice.

You might like to read...

  • Anna Fadiman, Ex Libris: Confessions of a Common Reader (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2000)
  • R. Eaglestone, Doing English (Routledge, 2017)
  • Black writing resources in the UK.

You might like to follow... 

Follow our @EnglishBSU account and you'll pick up lots of other fascinating accounts. Remember to tell us what you're reading at the moment!

Tips from your tutors...

"Read beyond your comfort zone: be curious and stray off your usual track of reading. Make connections between what you're reading (or listening to) and the world around you and your experiences, even if – or perhaps especially if – what you're reading seems historically or geographically distant."

Environmental Science

You might like to listen to...

Popular BBC Radio 4 science programme The Infinite Monkey Cage offers a lot of easily accessible scientific information and will probably make you laugh!

You might like to read...

This free open source Biology book gives a good idea of the level expected for first year core elements, and the introductory Chapters (1 and 2) should give you an introduction or review of the biological world. You might also find it useful to read our Subject Newsletter, 'A Bite of Bio' to see what our students get up to.

You might like to follow... 

Tips from your tutors...

"You'll start to become a professional scientist; a big part of that is writing appropriately and following conventions, whilst making your work clear and impactful as well as engaging. This can be quite a challenge, but a good tip is to start reading published scientific literature, perhaps using a public search engine such as Google Scholar in the first instance. Think of a topic you're interested in and have a search to see what is out there on it. Take note of the writing style and structures as you read; this will help you develop your own writing skills."

Fashion Design

You might like to watch...

Fashion is informed by and has an influence on all areas of society, including music and films, and these can be a great source of inspiration.

  • Sign up for a free trial to the British Film Institute (BFI) to discover and enjoy landmark classic and cult films from across the decades. The free trial lasts for 14 days, so remember to cancel or you'll be charged £4.99 a month!
  • Watch documentaries of designers talking about their practice on YouTube
  • Watch John Galliano for Margiela on SHOWstudio – a great insight into design process.

You might like to read...

Start to build your knowledge of all areas of the associated fashion industry by signing up to the following free websites:

You might like to follow... 

Anyone you find inspiring both from within and outside of fashion. Before starting uni, set up a work-based Instagram where you can start to follow people you find inspiring for whatever reason: artists, musicians, photographers, stylists, actors, as well as the designers and brands you admire.

You can also follow the fashion department @bathspafashion to see the work of graduates and students.

Tips from your tutors...

"Be interested and curious about everything – fashion is not just about the clothes. Spend the summer discovering new things, not just what you already know. Get a feel for what is going on at the moment globally in fashion. Look at how the pandemic has changed the way designers and brands market themselves, and make a note of the names of people you discover who you admire or inspire you."

Fashion Marketing and Management

You might like to read...

You could read anything by Harriet Posner as a great introduction to the subject. Sign up to Business of Fashion, Vogue BusinessHypeBeast and Highsnobiety (all free) for weekly and daily updates as to what is happening in the industry.

You might like to follow... 

Anyone you find inspiring both within and outside of the fashion industry. Make sure you have, at the least, an Instagram account before starting uni and try to follow:

  • At least one non-high street brand
  • One luxury label
  • One sustainable label
  • An influencer
  • A musician
  • A foodie
  • A film person
  • An artist.

Tips from your tutors...

"Spend your summer getting a feel for what's going on in the fashion industry at the moment. Pay attention to marketing campaigns, the faces in the adverts. Learn their names as well as the names of the people who run the industry (Edward Enninful at Vogue UK for example). Be interetsed in everything – fashion is not just about clothes!"

Film and Screen Studies

You might like to watch...

How about watching The Story of Film: An Odyssey? It's an expansive and international look at the history of cinema. You'll learn so much about cinema by watching this series of documentaries and find hundreds of new films to watch! Then, we recommend you turn your attention to the 14 hour epic that is Women Make Film: A New Road Movie Through Cinema. Both can be found on BFI.

You might like to read...

Have a look at the BFI Statistical Yearbook for 2020. It's full of fascinating facts and figures about the state of our industry in terms of production, distribution and exhibition in relation to cinema and online trend.

You might like to try...

Find a list of the top grossing movies of 2020. How many of these are original or one-off new films, so not prequels, sequels, remakes, reboots or spin-offs? What might this tell us about popular film and why? Are any of these (subtitled) non-English language films? You can do the same thing with music, television, games or podcasts!

Tips from your tutors...

"Stay passionate about your subject, embrace learning, be open to new ideas and find your voice!"

Anything else?

Try to get into a routine of spending the same amount of time each day reading/making notes on your study rather than saving it up for a long bout when you have to do an assignment. Always follow up on things you don't know.

Film, TV and Digital Production

You might like to watch...

Watch The Story of Film: An Odyssey directed by Mark Cousins. It's an expansive and international look at the history of Cinema. You'll learn so much about cinema by watching this series of documentaries and find hundreds of new films to watch!

Also check out Every Frame a Painting, a series of video essays about film form.

You might like to read...

You'll have access to all of these books through the Bath Spa University Library once you've fully enrolled.

You might like to listen to...

  • S Town is a real life contemporary American tale. Way darker than what you might have expected.
  • Homecoming is a great story podcast, now a movie. We prefer the podcast as the sound design works so well
  • Death in Ice Valley is a real scandi-noir where you drink the coffee. Surprising.
  • You can listen to the British Academy of Film and Television Art’s own collection of interviews and talks BAFTA Guru. Or watch the videos.

You might like to follow... 

Fine Art

You might like to watch...

Have a look at TateShots; a wonderful resource of short videos with a focus on modern and contemporary art. Also check out UbuWeb for an amazing collection of films and sound art.

You might like to read...

Check out e-flux or read something from your reading list, such as John Berger's Ways of Seeing.

You might like to follow...

Follow our Fine Art Instagram account: @bath_bafineart.

You might like to visit...

Tips from your tutors...

"Enjoy the work we've set over the summer. We want you to experiment and push your ideas. It's possible that you'll learn more from the things that don't work, so embrace the failures. Enjoy your summer. We can't wait to meet you all. Drop me an email if you have any questions at all – n.kidd@bathspa.ac.uk."

Anything else?

Complete the Summer Project that you've been sent. Enjoy!

Food with Nutrition

You might like to watch...

Our course is accredited by the Institute of Food Science and Technology (IFST), the UK’s leading professional body for those involved in all aspects of food science and technology. The IFST has run several very interesting and thought-provoking webinar series that are well worth a watch.

Another series that we'd encourage you to watch is BBC 2's Inside the Factory. In semester two's Food, Nutrition and Health module, one of your assignments is the development and evaluation of a vegetarian/vegan soup. In week two, this series explores the development of a soup.

You might like to read...

The IFST also publishes position statements and a wide range of topics, which are well referenced with sources from peer reviewed journals.

You might like to follow...

Tips from your tutors...

"The course provides you with the knowledge and skills to pursue a career in the food and nutrition sector. A big part of that is writing appropriately and following conventions, whilst making your work clear and impactful as well as engaging. This can be quite a challenge, but a good tip is to start exploring the resources available on the IFST website, reading published scientific literature perhaps using a public search engine such as Google Scholar in the first instance. Think of a topic you're interested in and have a search to see what's out there on it. Take note of the writing style and structures as you read – this will help you develop your own writing skills."

Forensic Psychology

You might like to watch...

Psychology is a fascinating subject, so we're spoiled for choice. You may enjoy YouTube’s Mind Field and Vsauce. The BBC has some great offerings including Inside Science, Inside Health, The Life Scientific, The Infinite Monkey Cage, The Curious Cases of Rutherford & Fry, and All in the Mind. We also love a good podcast in Psychology so do check out Scienceish, Hidden Brain, 60 Second Mind, and Brain Science.

You might like to read...

Of course, our reading lists are a great place to start but you could explore all of psychology through the freely available NOBA collection.

For those looking to get a head start on statistics, Understanding and using statistics in psychology: A practical introduction is friendly and well written.

To get a forensic focus, check out Investigative Psychology: Offender Profiling and the Analysis of Criminal Action.

For those looking for popular press material, check out one of our own academic’s work in Popular Science or Newsweek.

Finally, for those looking for a great summer book, we'd recommend The Great Pretender: The Undercover Mission that Changed our Understanding of MadnessPhantoms in the Brain: Human Nature and the Architecture of the Mind, or a book by one of our very own Lost in a Good Game: Why we play video games and what they can do for us.

You might like to follow...

Our course is accredited by @BPSOfficial; it's also worth following @ExpPsychSoc, @RCPsych, @APA and our very own @BSUHealCognit.

Tips from your tutors...

"You're about to begin your life as a scientist of human behaviour and the mind. The more you can read and explore across the wide range of topics covered within Psychology, the more you're likely to find unexpected delights. It's worth taking a look at scientific literature to get a sense of how it is written and conducted, as you begin your journey as a researcher. The Journal of Forensic Psychology makes their in press articles freely accessible and would be a great place to start."

Games Development

You might like to watch...

YouTube is a great resource for finding game reviews and game making tips from developers. We recommend the GDC channel for the latest news and game making techniques from leading lights in the game developer community.

You might like to read...

Keeping up to date with what’s new is key to this ever evolving discipline. Understanding advancements in game theory and current best practices in game development help you grow with the industry. We recommend reading posts on community blogs like Gamasutra and articles by leading theorists in The International Journal of Computer Game Research.

You might like to try...

 There are a range of free online tools to get you in the habit of experimenting with new game ideas. Two popular prototyping tools with active game developer communities are Bitsy and Twine. Try taking part in a Game Jam, you can find plenty to join on the indie game sharing site itch.io.

Tips from your tutors

"A complete knowledge of the game development pipeline is an advantage when entering the games industry and will be the focus of this degree course. To take a game from concept to public release requires a broad range of knowledge and skills including art, design, production management, and programming.

Replay some of your favourite game titles and think critically about the motivations behind design choices and the range of skills involved in its creation. Consider what makes an interesting gameplay experience by beginning to design your own game concepts, and improve them by testing these ideas out on friends."

Geography (all pathways)

You might like to watch...

You might like to read...

Keep up to date with world affairs through reliable news sources:

Keep up to date with geographical stories on:

Undertake the recommended preparatory reading for Environment, People and Place, Global Development and Geographical Skills modules:

Environment People and Place

  • Cloke, P., Crang, P. and Goodwin, M. (2014) Introducing human geographies, 3rd edition. London: Hodder Arnold. (recommended for purchase; 'Introduction and Foundations' section is a good starting point).
  • Holden, J. (ed.) (2017) An introduction to physical geography and the environment, 4th edition. Harlow: Pearson-Prentice Hall.

Global Development

  • Potter, R.B., Binns, T., Elliott, J.A. and Smith, D. (2008) Geographies of Development, 3rd edition, Harlow: Pearson Education. (Read chapter one as a starting point).

Geographical Skills

  • Clifford, N., Cope, M., Gillespie, T., French, S. (2016) Key Methods in Geography, 3rd Edition. Sage, London.

You might like to follow...

Our courses are accredited by The Royal Geographical Society with IGB. Follow here: @RGS_IBG, @RGS_IBGhe.

Also check out:

Tips from your tutors...

"Keep up with news and events and documentaries on social and environmental themes – there are lots (climate change, migration, globalisation and inequalities, disasters management, river management, cultural identities and landscape). Dip into the academic literature for your course and be prepared to think about current global challenges from different angles and approaches."

Anything else?

We recommend that you invest in hiking boots and a waterproof coat for fieldwork.

Global Development and Sustainability

You might like to listen to...

You might like to read...

Undertake recommended preparatory reading for Environment, People and Place, Global Development, and Sustainability in Life and Work modules:

Environment People and Place

  • Cloke, P., Crang, P. and Goodwin, M. (2014) Introducing human geographies, 3rd edition. London: Hodder Arnold. (recommended for purchase; 'Introduction and Foundations' section is a good starting point).
  • Holden, J. (ed.) (2017) An introduction to physical geography and the environment, 4th edition. Harlow: Pearson-Prentice Hall.

Global Development

  • Potter, R.B., Binns, T., Elliott, J.A. and Smith, D. (2008) Geographies of Development, 3rd edition, Harlow: Pearson Education. (Read chapter one as a starting point).

Sustainability in Life and Work 

  • Villiers-Stuart, P. and Stibbe, A. (eds) The Handbook of Sustainability Literacy, which is available online.

You might like to follow...

Our courses are accredited by The Royal Geographical Society with IGB. Follow here: @RGS_IBG@RGS_IBGhe.

Also check out:

Anything else?

We recommend that you invest in hiking boots and a waterproof coat for fieldwork.

Graphic Communication

You might like to listen to...

You might like to read...

  • Design as Art by Bruno Munari
  • A Type Primer by John Kane

You might like to follow...

Tips from your tutors...

"Learn how to cook some simple healthy food, and practice doing the washing up afterwards!"

Anything else?

Draw, photography, look; read about type.

History (all pathways)

You might like to watch...

There are some great videos on the History Matters YouTube channel – and in case you wanted to fill in all the missing bits of the history of the world, there's History of the world I guess

You might like to read...

  • The Uses and Abuses of History (Margaret MacMillan, 2008)

You might like to follow...

Tips from your tutors...

"We're living in interesting times! As Lenin probably didn't say, 'There are decades where nothing happens; and there are weeks where decades happen.' From Brexit to Coronavirus to climate change protests to Black Lives Matter... you should try to keep up with the news and think about it in historical context. Have we been here before? Can history help us understand what's happening right now? What do you think future historians will say? How do we preserve and remember the past, and how does this play into current debates about statues of historical figures?"

Human Nutrition

You might like to watch and listen to...

MyNutriWeb (@MyNutriweb) shows free online nutrition webinars for professionals. The Table Talk podcast discusses some very interesting topics, and you should listen to BBC Radio 4's The Food Programme.

You might like to read...

It's useful to keep up to date with nutrition stories in the news and media. Information can be verified by looking at the British Nutrition Foundation, Food Matters or Food Standards Agency websites.

You might like to follow...

Our course is accredited with the Association for Nutrition, @AfNutr, therefore, it's important that anyone you follow is a Registered Nutritionist or Dietitian so that you know the information you're getting is scientifically correct and evidence-based. Other useful groups to follow include:

Tips from your tutors...

"You'll start to become a professional nutritionist; a big part of that is writing appropriately and following conventions, whilst making your work clear and impactful as well as engaging. This can be quite a challenge, but a good tip is to start reading published scientific literature perhaps using a public search engine such as Google Scholar in the first instance. Think of a topic you're interested in and have a search to see what's out there on it. Take note of the writing style and structures as you read; this will help you develop your own writing skills."

Integrated Foundation in Art and Design

You might like to watch...

You might like to read...

  • Read issues of K-Hole (free downloadable PDFs)
  • Listen to the podcast Interdependance as they have conversations with leading figures shaping 21st century culture
  • Read about the 'Carbon Revolution' and its impact upon material evolution.

You might like to...

Tips from your tutors...

"Be playful, experimental and enjoy the Summer Project: Curious Collector + Plinth Maker that we sent to you. If you have any questions please feel free to contact me on j.kelham@bathspa.ac.uk."

Anything else?

Interior Design

You might like to watch...

You might like to read...

Read a key text: 

  • Scott, Fred (2007) On altering architecture. London and New York: Routledge.
  • Cramer, J. (2007) Architecture in Existing Fabric: Planning, Design and Building, Basel, Berlin and Boston: Birkhäuser.

You might like to follow...

Tips from your tutors...

"Take the time to practise sketching and drawing. Visit an interesting building, and sketch it out to understand it as a structure. Also – enjoy the summer!"

International Development and Education

You might like to watch...

Start listening to podcasts on both of educational and development issues from such as FreshEd and Between the Lines (by Institute of Development Studies).

You might like to read...

Keep up-to-date with the latest news in education in the global context, for example, the Guardian Education, Times Higher Education, and Los Angeles Times Education. Keep an eye on international institutions, targets and programmes in development and education, such as UNESCOUNDP, the United Nations' Sustainable Development Goals and the Global Partnership for Education.

You might like to follow...

Many of our own Bath Spa staff have published in education, such as Professor Martin Levinson and Professor Charlotte Chadderton. Externally, you might like to follow scholars such as Professor Gita Steiner-Khamsi and Professor Mario Novelli.

Tips from your tutors...

"This award is not just about schooling and formal education, so try to read broadly and browse websites of international organisations, aid agencies and educational institutions; try to explore what 'education' means/looks like in different international contexts."

Anything else?

Don't forget to enjoy your summer!

Journalism and Publishing

You might like to watch...

Try watching the BBC News occasionally and also programmes such as a Newsnight. Also give some of the great news podcasts a try, such as:

You might like to read...

You might like to follow...

  • @BSUPublishing
  • All the major newspapers
  • Start to find journalists you enjoy reading and follow them on Twitter and/or Instagram.

Tips from your tutors...

"Read as many different newspapers and news websites as possible. Try to buy a different newspaper (e.g. The Guardian, The Times, The Telegraph, etc.) every weekend and really delve into the different sections of the weekend papers to get a feel for how writing differs across sports, home, lifestyle, fashion, etc., as well as news."

Anything else?

Explore Newton Park's Nature Walks; take part in our social media challenge! You'll be able to get a map during our Welcome Weeks.

Law

You might like to watch...

For some lighthearted viewing with a little bit of law attached, Suits on Netflix is a good watch. To help you with your studies please have a look at the following YouTube videos:

You might like to read...

It's really important for future lawyers to have an understanding of the commercial environment and a wider appreciation of what's going on in the world. Try to look at reputable news sources such as The TimesThe Telegraph and The Guardian. Keep up with Legal Cheek and the Financial Times for an appreciation of business. Consider the impact of the coronavirus on the Law.

You might like to follow...

Follow your course leader on LinkedIn as he posts law stories and tips for students.

Tips from your tutors...

"Read newspapers and look at websites to start to get an appreciation of law and business. Make sure you watch the clips that I have highlighted – Suits is optional but fun! One of your first sessions will be about how to get a first class Law degree. You can start in the summer by following Legal Cheek which is really good for getting an appreciation of what's going on in the industry. You may see some courses in commercial awareness or virtual law fairs – sign up for them. If you have contacts that are solicitors or barristers or in business, don't be shy in asking for work experience. Building your CV? Start early." 

Anything else?

Got a question? Drop your course leader, Steven, an email: s.goulton@bathspa.ac.uk.

Media Communication

You might like to watch...

We have a wealth of film, television and radio databases available to you including Box of Broadcasts and Kanopy. As soon as you're registered, enjoy working your way around the myriad topics, titles and formats to broaden your media engagement and research horizons.

You might like to read...

To keep an eye on current debates from the field of media communications, please take a moment to read/listen to and/or watch some of the following – it may ignite a project idea or two:

You might like to try...

Create a weekly media diary listing all your engagements with different media. Record how long you spend watching, listening, reading and playing, as well as how much time you spend making and sharing media of your own. You might also consider how these patterns have changed in recent months or years and whether you think they’ll change once you begin your studies!

Tips from your tutors...

"Stay passionate about your subject, embrace learning, be open to new ideas and find your voice!"

Anything else?

We want you to develop both the research and creative skills you need to make sense of the role of media in the world around us – at a local, national and global level. Be keen, be curious and get ready to make media meaningful!

Music

You might like to watch...

Watch as many live performances as you can. Immerse yourselves in music of all genres and cultures. Enjoy music!

You might like to listen to...

BBC Radio 3: Fifty Modern Classics Podcast or any of the Soul Music podcast series. Discover everything from 'Sitting on the Dock of the Bay' to Debussy's 'Prelude a l'apres midi d'un faune' as poets, writers, performers and public figures share their passion for well-known pieces.

You might like to read...

  • Cook, Nicholas. Music: A Very Short Introduction. Very Short Introductions. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2000.
  • Ross, Alex. The Rest Is Noise: Listening to the Twentieth Century. Harper Perennial ed. London: Harper Perennial, 2009.

Tips from your tutors...

"Having survived the hardships of a global pandemic, music and the performing arts are hungry for a resurgence. When you come to us there will be a buzz like never before. Students will be craving the opportunities to make music that they have been denied due to Covid. Ensure you are fully prepared and ready for an immersive experience at Bath Spa! We're really excited to welcome you."

Philosophy and Ethics (combined award)

You might like to watch...

Start listening to podcasts from Philosophy Bites. There are more than 400 to choose from; just pick some topics that interest you and start thinking. 

You might like to read...

Have a look at our reading lists or start with the Oxford Very Short Introductions on relevant topics that interest you (Atheism, Aristotle, Existentialism, Political Philosophy etc.).

You might like to follow...

Don't be a follower – be a thinker!

Tips from your tutors...

"Philosophically, try to keep track of arguments and ideas that seem mistaken to you. Where and why do you think they're wrong? Pursue questions wherever they may lead you, and dare to imagine that the world may be far stranger than you've been taught. What is truth, and why does it matter?"

Anything else?

Question everything (including whether you should question everything).

Politics (combined award)

You might like to read...

If you're studying Politics as part of your course, please have a look at the information under History to start you off. You might also like to look at two recent publications about living in Britain right now:

  • Rowland Atkinson, Alpha City: How London was captured by the super rich (Verso, 2020)
  • and Afua Hirsch, Brit(ish): On race, identity and belonging (Vintage, 2018).

Photography

You might like to watch...

You might like to read...

  • Basic Critical Theory for Photographers by A La Grange
  • Ways of Seeing by John Berger 
  • Why It Does Not Have To Be In Focus by Jackie Higgins

You might like to follow...

Tips from your tutors...

"Get used to asking questions – and maybe not knowing the answers – yet. Think about photography in the context of 'a practice' and yourself as both a professional photographer and an artist. Is there a difference? Look at where and how photographs are displayed – supermarkets, gallery walls, screens, books and zines. Think about all those photographs that you've taken on your phone or camera – this may get you thinking about photographs and memory or photographs and their relationship to time. Most importantly, think about things that you really enjoy doing and that really interest you, and how you might use these as a source for your photographic work."

Anything else?

Make your own photographs. Look at others' photographs. Sit back and think about photographs. Don't be afraid to make 'mistakes' and to use them productively.

Product and Furniture Design

You might like to listen to...

You might like to read...

You might like to visit...

You might like to follow...

Tips from your tutors...

"Come with an open mind and a willingness to try different ways of working. Enjoy the summer project we sent you. Get in touch if you have any questions - j.keyte@bathspa.ac.uk."

Psychology

You might like to watch...

Psychology is a fascinating subject, so we're spoiled for choice. You may enjoy YouTube’s Mind Field and Vsauce. The BBC has some great offerings including Inside Science, Inside Health, The Life Scientific, The Infinite Monkey Cage, The Curious Cases of Rutherford & Fry, and All in the Mind. We also love a good podcast in Psychology so do check out Scienceish, Hidden Brain, 60 Second Mind, and Brain Science.

You might like to read...

Of course, our reading lists are a great place to start but you could explore all of psychology through the freely available NOBA collection.

For those looking to get a head start on statistics, Understanding and using statistics in psychology: A practical introduction is friendly and well written.

For those looking for popular press material, check out one of our own academic’s work in Popular Science or Newsweek.

Finally, for those looking for a great summer book, we'd recommend The Great Pretender: The Undercover Mission that Changed our Understanding of MadnessPhantoms in the Brain: Human Nature and the Architecture of the Mind, or a book by one of our very own Lost in a Good Game: Why we play video games and what they can do for us.

You might like to follow...

Our course is accredited by @BPSOfficial; it's also worth following @ExpPsychSoc, @RCPsych, @APA and our very own @BSUHealCognit.

Tips from your tutors...

"You're about to begin your life as a scientist of human behaviour and the mind. The more you can read and explore across the wide range of topics covered within Psychology, the more you're likely to find unexpected delights. It's also worth taking a look at the scientific literature to get a sense of how it is written and conducted, as you begin your journey as a researcher. The Journal of Social Psychology makes some interesting articles freely accessible and would be a great place to start."

Publishing (combined award)

You might like to watch...

Watch arts and current affairs programmes and documentaries, for example, BBC4 and Radio 4 discussion programmes and podcasts. Watch out for episodes of The Beauty of Books (BBC4), The Secret Life of Books (BBC4), Between the Covers (BBC2) and Open Book (Radio 4).

You might like to read...

  • Eats, Shoots & Leaves by Lynne Truss
  • Merchants of Culture by John Thompson
  • Books That Changed History by DK, 2017
  • Take a look at the Bath Spa Library's reading list on Race, Racism and Protest.

You might like to follow...

Tips from your tutors...

"Be curious and interested in everything, and notice how stories, news and factual content is presented differently in magazines, books, newspapers, blogs and social media. Start to deconstruct content and look at how it has been arranged, what typefaces have been used, how the images work with the text and the tone of voice of the writing."

Religions, Philosophies and Ethics

You might like to watch...

Start listening to podcasts from Philosophy Bites. There are more than 400 to choose from; just pick some topics that interest you and start thinking. 

You might like to read...

Have a look at our reading lists or start with the Oxford Very Short Introductions on relevant topics that interest you (Atheism, Aristotle, Buddhism, Existentialism, Hinduism etc.).

You might like to follow...

Don't be a follower – be a thinker.

Tips from your tutors...

"Philosophically, try to keep track of arguments and ideas that seem mistaken to you. Where and why do you think they go wrong? Pursue questions wherever they may lead you, and dare to imagine that the world may be far stranger than you have been taught. Also, make a point of reflecting on religious stories and themes in the news. What picture of contemporary religion and spirituality do they present?"

Anything else?

Think, question and reflect.

Sociology

Tips from your tutors...

"Indulge your sociological imagination. Read about the topics that interest you. Talk to people to find out what they think. Get involved."

Anything else?

Keep in touch with current affairs through good quality media.

Textile Design for Fashion and Interiors

You might like to listen to...

Listen, and have an opinion:

You might like to watch...

You might like to read...

You might like to try...

Please check out some traditional skills and try to master and develop one. For example, take a look at the hook rug technique. YouTube will have a wealth of videos to watch. This was made in the studio after exploring rag rug making.

You might like to follow...

Tips from your tutors...

Get excited – this is what you've been waiting for! Follow our interactions in our Facebook group.

Anything else?

We're hoping, with restrictions being lifted, to visit this exhibition and fingers crossed we can get to see this too. We hope to get to Paris in February to PremiereVision. Check out the website for lots of interesting articles and videos.

Theatre, Festival and Event Production

You might like to watch...

Watching live productions will enable you to study how design, lighting, costume, sound and stage management come together seamlessly during performance. In the current Covid 19 situation, this isn't easy, but you can still follow a range of productions on What's on Stage. Watch a selection of different forms of performance to see how each genre utilises the skills of each creative department to enhance the production.

You might like to read...

Reading up on all subjects related to design, making, technical production and operation will broaden your understanding of the many processes and techniques involved in production. Below are some online books that we'd recommend to beginners that are available in e-format. These are just recommendations, and not exclusive; there are many great books and online resources out there that will help to prepare you for the exciting three years ahead. In the meantime, read up on the disciplines and subjects that are currently most interesting to you.

Lighting eBooks:

  • Abulafia, Y. (2016) The art of light on stage: lighting in contemporary theatre. Abingdon: Routledge, 2016
  • Fraser, N., Attenborough, R., 1999. Stage lighting design: a practical guide. Ramsbury: The Crowood Press, 1999

Sound eBooks:

  • Hopgood, J. (2013) Qlab 3 Show Control. Amsterdam: Focal Press
  • Palmer, S. (2000) Essential Guide to Stage Management, Lighting and Sound. London: Hodder & Stoughton

Stage Management eBooks:

  • Stern, L., and Gold, J. (2017) Stage Management, New York: Routledge
  • Bond, D. (1998) Stage Management: The Gentle Art, London: A & C Black

Costume eBooks:

  • Huaixiang, T. (2018) Character Costume Figure Drawing, Step by Step Drawing Methods for Theatre Costume Designers: Focal Press
  • Aldrich, W. (2011) Metric Pattern Cutting for Menswear. 5th Edition: Blackwell

Stagecraft eBook:

  • Rigden, D. (2018) The Prop Maker's Workshop Manual, Crowood Theatre Companions

Scenic Design eBooks:

  • Klingelhoefer, R. (2017) The craft and art of scenic design: strategies, concepts, and resources
  • Di Benedetto, S. (2012) An introduction to theatre design. London: Routledge

Tips from your tutors...

"We'll be teaching you a lot of new creative, technical and managerials skills over the coming years that will challenge you and prepare you for the working industry. My advice would be to study as many different creative industries and forms of production as you can that are related to your current subject interests. This will enable you to begin to understand the diversity and challenges of live production. Look into the operational processes of theatre, opera, musicals, festivals, ballet, events, dance, circus, TV, live music and drama to relate the many skills, processes and people that make it possible. The skills you'll learn are transferable across the creative industries so begin to consider the options and possibilities ahead of you. Understanding the developing creative industries will allow you to make the most of your study, identify the connections between each subject, and map your potential career."

Anything else?

Due to the practical nature of the course, here's a list of equipment that you'll need for your study. Some are Health and Safety items that are essential to participating in certain activities. These items should last you for the three years of your study.

Postgraduate course preparation materials

Many of our course tutors have shared their tips to help you prepare for your studies. Find them below!

Arts Management

You might like to watch...

Inside Culture on BBC iPlayer. It's a topical look at the latest film, TV, music, books and theatre - through the eyes of their creators and their audiences.

You might like to read...

Strategic Management in the Arts by Linda Verbanova (Routledge)

You might like to follow...

This will depend upon your interests within the arts and which area you might want to pursue. Local organisations such as The Holburne MuseumTheatre Royal Bath and Bath Festivals are a good starting point. There's also the Arts Council, Visual Arts South West, M ShedArtspace Lifespace and many many more.

Tips from your tutors...

"Start thinking about what your interests are, but also what skills you might already have and which you would like to develop further."

Anything else?

Arts Management is a varied course that aims to increase students' understanding of the ever changing external environment that arts organisations need to navigate. Along with developing the individual skills, experience and attributes that graduates need in a competitive industry.

Children's Publishing

You might like to read...

Merchants of Culture: The Publishing Business in the Twenty-first Century by John B Thompson provides an excellent overview of the publishing industry. 100 Great Children's Picturebooks by Martin Salisbury offers a very visual introduction to picturebooks.

You might like to follow...

Twitter is great for publishing – follow different publishers, writers, editors and illustrators.

Tips from your tutors...

"Read widely and browse the children's sections of bookshops – this will help you to identify current trends."

Composition

You might like to listen to...

Be curious. Listen to things you don’t know. Explore an area of current practice which has a connection with your work. Try to listen to at least five pieces made in the last year.

You could also listen to recent editions of BBC Radio 3 programmes such as the New Music Show, and explore some of the many score follower YouTube channels, which allow you to hear new pieces and learn more about different notational practices.

You might like to read...

A good primer on recent new music is Tim Rutherford-Johnson’s 2017 book, Music after the Fall: Modern Composition and Culture since 1989. Oakland, California: University of California Press. Tim has compiled a Spotify playlist of pieces referred to in the book.

You could also look through Jennie Gottschalk’s survey of recent experimental music. It’s very useful for finding new music to explore: Gottschalk, J. (2016) Experimental Music since 1970. New York: Bloomsbury.

Tips from your tutors...

"It would be great if you could bring some previous work along to your first tutorials and have a sense of what you want to focus on this year. There will be a mix of organised projects and work which you originate yourself, so have a think about what you want to do."

Counselling and Psychotherapy Practice

You might like to watch...

Anything related to your subject area of interest and research topics. 

You might like to read... (completely optional for now!)

Look at our module reading lists (for example Etherington, McLeod) and consider subject areas that you're interested in and want to research, for example, trauma and ecotherapy.

You might like to follow...

Again, this would depend on your subject areas of interest for example, Allan Schore on Neuroscience, Caroline Brazier on Buddhsim and ecotherapy, John McLeod on research or Mick Cooper on Existentialism and relational depth.

Tips from your tutors...

"Make sure you're organised and have allotted time and space for reading and study. This may sound obvious – but you'd be surprised how often this is often overlooked!"

Anything else?

We're reflective practitioners by nature, but start to think about your current roles and practice and how this could be utilised in your study, for example, an ethical dilemma you'd like to research further, or how you're integrating new interventions and skill sets and how this impacts your delivery of service.

Creative Computing

You might like to try...

Why not pick up some new skills before commencing MSc Creative Computing? If you’ve not programmed before, try working your way through the C++ Codecademy course or the platform’s Web Development Career Path. You can also check out software packages for creative coding such as Processing and experiment with data visualisation tools like Flourish. The more you explore, the more options will be available to you when shaping your master's projects.

You might like to read...

Begin by building an understanding of the UK tech sector and creative industries through websites such as Tech Nation and Creative Industries. You can also keep on top of creative tech events happening in the Bath and Bristol area through TechSpark and Creative Bath. We recommend also becoming familiar with regional events such as Bath Digital Festival and the many activities taking place at Bristol’s Pervasive Media Studio.

Tips from your tutors...

"MSc Creative Computing offers lots of freedom to explore the collision of imagination and technology, whether through the lens of digital art, interactive storytelling, product development or otherwise. To take advantage of this, we recommend that you identify what you hope to achieve on the course and what areas of digital creativity most interest you. Before starting your studies, try collecting three examples of existing projects that you find inspiring/compelling. Have these to hand for your first session with us. Consider also outlining two project ideas that you’d like to pursue in MSc Creative Computing. You can express these ideas in any way you like."

Creative Producing

You might like to watch...

The cornerstone of Creative Producing is about brilliant creative ideas, how they're made and what audiences like to see. The best way to understand this is to immerse yourself in arts and culture, especially live theatre productions and events. Watch as much work as you can, live or recorded. Begin to understand what type of work happens and where.

Familiarise yourself with recent local and national theatre activity:

It's also worth checking out The Royal Court Playwright’s PodcastInside Culture on BBC iPlayer and What's On Stage.

You might like to read…

  • Key Concepts in Creative Industries. Hartley, John; Potts, Jason; Cunningham, Stuart; Flew, Terry; Keane, Michael; Banks, John; Hartley, John Publication Key Concepts in Creative Industries.
    This is a one-stop introductory text for students wanting to understand the creative industries, what they are, what they do and how they affect our society.
  • So you want to be a theatre producer? Seabright, James, 2010. Nick Hern Books.

It's worth keeping an eye on The Guardian which regularly offers links to online productions and the latest theatre reviews. Have a look at The Stage for what’s going on in the industry.

It's also useful to find out about important organisations in the industry. Here are a few to start you off:

You might like to follow…

Tips from your tutors...

"Come with some ideas for projects, even if it's to produce one event, you have to start somewhere. No idea is too small …so let's get started.

Start thinking about what your interests are, about what skills and knowledge you bring to your MA. Remember this is the beginning of your professional and personal development journey.

You can contact me with any questions or thoughts about the course or your work on k.irvine@bathspa.ac.uk."

Anything else?

By being on this course you're now a Associate Producer of Bath Spa Productions.

Creative Writing

Tips from your tutors...

"To prepare for the course, please continue to write, and to plan your manuscript. Identify your strengths and weaknesses as a writer, and read as much contemporary writing as possible that is relevant to your own but different from what you have read before. Look for writing that shares subject matter with yours but uses a different literary style, form or genre. Look for writing that challenges your views in some important way. Look for the best new writing in your chosen genre. Keep a notebook recording your reactions to what you read."

Criminology

You might like to watch...

Keep an eye on good quality news media for developments in criminal justice policy; be familiar with the main government websites:

You might like to read...

Tips from your tutors...

"Keep an open mind about what is and is not 'criminal'. Do not confuse the 'infotainment' crime documentaries provide with the reality of criminology; try to look beyond arguments about crime as 'good' and 'bad' and 'right' and 'wrong'. Perhaps you might want to consider the role of time, place and culture in making things 'criminal'."

Cyber Security

You might like to watch...

Current news and events in the cyber security world are covered by various websites. The Register is a good example.

You might like to read...

People working in small to medium-sized businesses can start with the UK’s Centre for the Protection of the National Infrastructure website, which has straightforward advice on many subjects including IT security. The U.S. CERT, the United States Computer Emergency Response Ready Team provides global updates from the American government. Get Safe Online is an excellent UK government resource with straightforward advice. The National Cyber Security Centre website is well worth looking at.

You might like to follow...

Tips from your tutors...

"Every time a cyber security issue is mentioned in the news, investigate it online. Ask yourself, why did it happen? Cyber security is about trust. Consider your online profile and what it suggests to someone who does not know you. If it does not convey the right image for your future career, get editing, today."

Directing

You might like to watch...

Directing is about brilliant creative ideas, vision and telling stories to audiences. The best way to understand this is to immerse yourself in arts and culture, especially live theatre productions and events. Watch as much work as you can, live or recorded. Begin to understand what type of work happens and where.

Familiarise yourself with recent local and national theatre activity:

It's also worth checking out The Royal Court Playwright’s PodcastInside Culture on BBC iPlayer and What's On Stage.

You might like to read…

  • The Cambridge Introduction to Theatre Directing, Author: Christopher Innes, Maria Shevtsova. Publisher: Cambridge University Press, Published 31 March, 2013.
    This introduction is an exciting journey through the different styles of theatre that twentieth-century and contemporary directors have created. It discusses artistic and political values, rehearsal methods and the diverging relationships with actors, designers, other collaborators and audiences
  • The Director's Craft. Author: Katie Mitchell. Publisher: Routledge Ltd Published 18 August, 2008
    This is a unique and completely indispensable step-by-step guide to directing for the stage. Written by one of the most adventurous and respected directors working today, this book will be an essential item in every student and practitioner's kitbag.

Keep an eye on The Guardian which regularly offers links to online productions and the latest theatre reviews. Have a look at The Stage for what’s going on in the industry.

It's also useful to find out about important organisations in the industry. Here are a few to start you off:

You might like to follow…

Tips from your tutors...

"Come with some ideas for projects, even if it's to direct a monologue or small scene, you have to start somewhere. No idea is too small… so let's get started.

Start thinking about what your interests are, about what skills and knowledge you bring to your MA. Remember this is the beginning of your professional and personal development journey. 

You can contact me with any questions about the course or your work on k.irvine@bathspa.ac.uk."

Anything else?

By being on this course you're now a Resident Director of Bath Spa Productions.

Environmental Humanities

You might like to watch...

You'll find some videos of past events hosted by Bath Spa's Research Centre for Environmental Humanities, including lectures by Kate Rigby and Mike Hannis, on our YouTube channel.

Keep a lookout for media discussion of environmental issues and consider how they're being framed. The Guardian has a special Green Light series which is well worth following and the BBC also has a dedicated Environment report. The BBC has aired broadcasts on Nature Writing and an excellent series on pioneering environmental thinkers/writers/activists called Green Originals. More recently, they've aired a conversation on 'eco-criticism' including Bath Spa's very own Samantha Walton.

We recommend that you also browse the websites of the Humanities for the Environment ObservatoriesBifrost (which includes a recent themed issue in response to Covid-19) and the Rachel Carson Center Environment and Society Portal.

You might like to read...

The best introduction to the environmental humanities is Emmett, R. and D. E. Nye, The Environmental Humanities: A Critical Introduction, Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2017. If you aren't able to get hold of a copy of the book before you enrol, you can start by reading Nye, David et al. (2013) The Emergence of the Environmental HumanitiesBackground Paper for the Swedish Foundation of Strategic Environmental Research.

You should also browse the open access online journal Environmental Humanities, beginning with the editorial introduction to the inaugural issue, Thinking through the Environment, Unsettling the Humanities.

For further background to the emergence of the environmental humanities (specifically, in Australia), see Rose, D. B. and Robin, Libby. 2004. The Ecological Humanities in Action: An InvitationAustralian Humanities Review 31-32.

Whether or not you're planning to take the Environmental Philosophy and Ethics optional module, the following provides an accessible introduction to the field of environmental thought: James, Simon (2015) Environmental Philosophy: An Introduction, London: Polity.

You might like to follow...

Twitter is a great way of keeping up with what's happening and building a professional network, so why not start by following @BSUEnvHums?

Education (Early Childhood Studies)

You might like to read...

You might like to...

Think about children in the age range from birth to eight years old in a family, an early childhood setting or classroom, and note how they develop their imaginations through play.

Tips from your tutors...

"Keep an eye on the press, and consider how young children are perceived in everyday situations, in their education, and how they have been impacted by the pandemic and during lockdown."

Education (Leadership and Management)

You might like to watch...

Check out this short TED talk on Everyday Leadership by Drew Dudley, where he talks about the need to redefine leadership.

You might like to read...

This short paper by David Gurr (2021) on educational leadership and the pandemic. The paper describes a leadership model which provides a core set of leadership domains that can be fine tuned by developing leadership capabilities to help navigate turbulent times.

You might like to...

Think about your educational experience from a student or professional perspective and reflect on what you enjoyed the most/least in terms of how the organisation was/is led.

Tips from your tutors...

"Keep an informal reflective journal to record your thoughts, questions and interesting ideas about leadership. This is for you to track the development of your ideas in this field."

Anything else?

Stay fit and network with students on other courses. Follow leadership professionals and organisations, for example, BELMAS and Advance HE.

Fine Art

You might like to watch...

Do some research via virtual learning provisons set up by the galleries including Tate Gallery, Serpentine Gallery and the ICA. The ICA has a great learning resource, while Brooklyn Rail magazine is a very good resource that showcases different artists studio visits and interviews.

You might like to read...

Eflux Journal is a platform for critical and contemporary art that publishes writings of the most engaged artists and thinkers working today. The information about curated essays and writtings can be found on their website. Further online resources are available from Frieze Magazine, Art ReviewUbuWeb and Monoskop.

You might like to follow...

Instagram is a good platform to find and to follow latest trends, reviews and happenings in the art world. Good galleries to follow include:

  • Tate Gallery
  • White Cube
  • Serpentine Gallery
  • Peer Gallery
  • Herald Street
  • Chisenhale Gallery
  • Corvi-Mora Gallery
  • V&A Museum

You could also follow art critics and curators such as:

  • Martin Coomer
  • Polly Staple
  • Lisa LeFeuvre
  • Mark Godfrey
  • Jeniffer Higgie (writer)
  • The White Pube

Tips from your tutors...

"Continue to develop and to make your work during the summer period, and have a more resolved approach to the work's context and the ideas you're interested in implementting and experimenting with on the MA Fine Art programme."

Anything else?

Whenever possible go and see as many art exhibitions and art works face to face, and make a point of really looking at the work in order to understand its materiality and learn about its processes and display.

Heritage Management

You might like to watch...

To get you thinking about the role of heritage within society, watch:

You might like to read...

The best way to get a sense of the current discussions, debates and challenges within the sector is to start reading lots of shorter opinion pieces and articles. You'll find there are lots out there, so don't feel you have to get your head around it all just yet! For the time being, just try following the things that interest or surprise you. The Museums AssociationMuseums+HeritageHeritage AllianceInternational Hertiage News and The Art Newpaper are all good places to start.

You might like to follow...

Twitter is a great way of keeping up with what is happening and building a professional network. Why not start by following @BSUHeritage?

Tips from your tutors...

"Given what you've chosen to study, it's highly likely that you love heritage, but now's the time to start thinking more critically and really questioning what heritage is, who decided what it is, and how it's used. Take some time to think about what you consider to be your own heritage and how this shapes your identity, as these are themes we'll be picking up on at the beginning of the course."

Anything else?

You might want to think about joining some of the key heritage organisations, although we suggest waiting until you are registered at Bath Spa so that you can benefit from the student membership rate. In the meantime, signing up for mailing lists is a great way of keeping up to date and finding out about events and opportunities. For local news and events we recommend South West Fed and South West Museum Development Programme.

Inclusive Education

You might like to watch...

Have a look at the SEND Gateway and nasen for a series of short webinars that highilght some key issues related to SEND and inclusion.

You might like to read...

Included or excluded by Ruth Cigman is a great place to start. Take a look at our initial reading list too. Special Needs Jungle provides an interesting comment on matters related to inclusion, from varying perspectives.

You might like to follow...

Twitter is a great way to keep up to date and engage in debate! Try:

Tips from your tutors...

"Start to think about the way in which you would like to shape your MA. Are you looking to develop a broad understanding, or develop your interest in a specific area? It's never too early to start to plan your route through the MA."

Professional Practice

You might like to read...

Consider your preferred topics of study, particularly if you're taking our popular Independent Study or Work-based Action Enquiry modules in trimester one. Search for the topic online and get a feel for what's out there. Google Scholar works better for this than the regular Google search. Remember, Master's level academic study requires a critical stance; wide and varied reading is an excellent foundation from which to develop a critical mind.

You might like to follow...

Once you've found some key names in your preferred subject area, look for them online. It is likely many will have a Twitter account, which will start to engage you in topical debates on your subject of choice.

Tips from your tutors...

"Be realistic when you're planning how much time you need for your Master's study. The taught component may seem very little, but that's because at Master's level, the expectation is that you'll put in many more hours of reading and independent study each week that aren't timetabled.

Reading will take a lot of your time, as will searching for articles and books to read. There will be points of high stress throughout the year – that's completely normal! The rewards are worth it, and we're here to support you every step of the way!"

Anything else?

It's a really good idea to start jotting down ideas for your final dissertation right from the beginning – you can even start now. You can discuss these with your classmates and tutors over the year, which will help you in developing a good focus for your intended study.

National Award for SEN Coordination

You might like to watch...

Have a look at the SEND Gateway and nasen for a series of short webinars that highlight some key issues related to SEND and inclusion.

You might like to read...

  • Chapter 6 in the SEND Code of Practice
  • Your school's SEN policy and Information Report

Tips from your tutors...

Start making some links online with other SENCOs. There are some fantastic networking and support groups. Nasen also host a #sencochat.

Psychology in Practice (Neuropsychology)

You might like to watch...

Social Neuropsychology: Challenge your assumptions by watching Lisa Feldman Barrett talking about emotions.

You might like to read...

The main textbook we'll use in Issues in Professional Practice is:

  • Dempster, M. (2011) A Research Guide for Health and Clinical Psychology, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.

Here is some reading we suggest over the first few weeks of the course. Get ahead!

  • Lee, A., and Irwin, R. (2018) Psychopathology: A Critical Perspective. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press
  • A less-academic but still excellent overview of emotions can be found in Barrett, L.F., (2018) How Emotions are Made. London: Pan

You might like to follow...

Follow the news from our Research Centre!

Tips from your tutors...

"Read everything and don't be afraid to challenge your beliefs and certainties. Read, reflect and react. Remember, a 30-credit module requires 300 hours of study. Make sure you can give this course the attention it requires!"

Anything else?

The British Psychological Society website offers some excellent documents that anyone interested in Professional Psychology should download and read.

If you're worried that your knowledge of brain anatomy isn't enough for this course, consult Paul John's excellent 'Clinical Neuroscience'. Remember, neuropsychology is not especially anatomical but a knowledge of how things fit together will help. This isn't a book to read cover to cover, but rather one to dip into.

Sound Arts

You might like to listen to...

Do lots of listening! It can be anything: some new music, or some interesting sound design, or any sounds around you in your day to day life that spark interest. You can get inspiration from all of them.

You might like to watch...

Check out the Sisters With Transistors documentary about electronic music's women pioneers.

You might like to read...

There are two big new books on Sound Art - Sound Art: Sound as a Medium of Art and The Oxford Companion to Sound Art. Both are great but expensive - probably don't buy them but get them out of the library (the Oxford Companion is out in August).

Tips from your tutors...

"Although it's early days, think a little about your Major Project, and the 'big thing' you want to do at the end of the course. This may well change, but it's good to have an idea of where you (might be) headed."

Sound Design

You might like to watch...

The Soundworks Collection is a great resource on the work of sound designers and composers within film and TV. Designing Sound is a great internet resource for sound design related content, which offers a lot of tutorials and interesting articles.

You might like to read...

Audio Vision (2nd Edition) by Michel Chion – this is one of the leading texts on the Sound Design subject and is recommended for everyone. Also, Sound Theory, Sound Practice by Rick Altman is a good title to start with.

Tips from your tutors...

"Have a good think about what you want to get out of the Sound Design programme. It may be useful to think about the project that you'd like to create for your Major Project. You could try to relate the Major Project to what you'd like to do after the Master's programme and how that project might then help you to reach that goal. Giving this some thought tends to help with planning the work for the MA modules in trimesters one and two."

Anything else?

If you want to buy new gear or software – don't let us stop you, but we recommend a certain amount of restraint. It may be better in some cases to wait and see where the course takes you before investing too much. If you have the ability to improve your Avid Pro Tools DAW skills before the course, then that could be beneficial, although it is perfectly fine to do this during the programme.

Specific Learning Difficulties / Dyslexia

You might like to watch...

You might like to read...

Tips from your tutors...

Take a look at some of the websites of organisations involved with SpLD/dyslexia such as the British Dyslexia Association (BSA), PATOSS and the Dyslexia Guild.

Anything else?

Consider how children and young people in your school setting are currently being supported.

TESOL

You might like to watch...

We recommend this hour-long lecture on teaching pronunciation by Adrian Underhill. Consider to what extent do you/can you teach explicit pronunciation, what are the typical pronunciation errors made in your context, and what you might do about them.

You might like to read...

Not TESOL-related but we recommend reading Guy Claxton's Hare Brain, Tortoise Mind (available in the library). It's a very thought-provoking book that makes a convincing argument for thinking less, in order to achieve more.

For TESOL, you cannot beat the ELT Journal. Have a browse through the "key concepts" sections and see which ones interest you the most.

You might like to...

Take a deep breath and start asking yourself - what type of teacher am I? What teacher would I like to be? What are my strengths and weaknesses right now? What are my goals for this year?

Tips from your tutors...

I'd start thinking about what sort of studying patterns work for you. Start thinking about what routines you can put in place to be efficient and effective in your studying. Don't worry if you don't get this immediately!

Anything else?

Go for a walk around Bath. Go to Bathwick Hill, Alexandria Park viewpoint, walk the canals, and walk/cycle the Bristol-Bath railway path. Take lots of photos and recharge your batteries for studying.

Writing for Young People

You might like to read...

Charlotte's Web by E.B White is the first set text on your reading list and will get you into the mindset of reading with a child's eye view.

You might like to follow...

Twitter is great for publishing – follow different publishers, writers, editors and illustrators.

Tips from your tutors...

"Read widely and voraciously, browse the children's sections of bookshops and talk to young readers about what they like best."

Your Library

Support during your studies

Our large electronic and print collections are available to support you with your studies and our friendly team are on hand to assist with any issues or queries you may have.

Check out our Library homepage, visit us in the Newton Park Library, email library@bathspa.ac.uk or get in touch via our 24/7 chat service.

Study spaces

We have lots of great places to study on campus, including drop-in and bookable spaces. A range of open access computers are available for use in the Newton Park Library as well as a range of spaces with charging points for using your own device.

To pre-book a space in the quiet study area in Newton Park Library, please visit the Library homepage. All other spaces are bookable via the Room Booking System on The Hub.

There are a number of spaces that are available for drop-in:

  • Newton Park Library
  • Main House (MHG15)
  • Main House (MHG13)
  • Main House (MHG14)
  • Commons (CMG09)
  • Open study space opposite Cafe Commons
  • The Street at Locksbrook Road
  • Room 31 at Corsham Court

Writing and Learning Centre

Here to support you with any aspect of your academic work, the team can help you with all types of academic writing, referencing, digital literacy, critical thinking, returning to study after a break, and maths and statistics. Get in touch: wlc@bathspa.ac.uk.

International students seeking similar support, please contact the English Language Unit: elc@bathspa.ac.uk.

Subject resources and Subject Librarians

Dedicated Subject Librarians can help you access the Library resources that are the most beneficial for your particular course. Subject librarians can help you with research for your assignment and finding relevant material within the collections.

LinkedIn Learning

LinkedIn Learning offers online learning in business, software, technology and creative skills. Gain access to a video library of top-quality courses taught by recognised industry experts.

Box of Broadcasts

BoB is an on-demand TV and radio resource for those in education. You can access it with your Bath Spa University account, and use it to watch and record recently aired programmes from over 65 channels.

What students say about independent learning...

'Independent learning' is probably the biggest change you'll find when you start university.

You'll be in charge of your own learning, which is great, but can also be a little scary! It can take a while to get to grips with planning your workload, but don’t panic. With a little bit of trial and error, you'll find the best way for you to study.

Here are some tips from past students to help you get a great start...

Plan your time

Buy a diary or use an online tool such as Evernote, Asana or Google Calendar. Add all your lectures, seminars and job commitments. Plan time to do your reading and research and add those too. Some experts suggest you allow for about 20 hours of study per week outside teaching times.

Get academic help when you need it

If you're struggling with time management or planning your writing assignments, the Writing and Learning Centre runs workshops and 1:1 support sessions.

Develop your note-taking skills

Reading and note-taking are key skills to help you make the most of lectures, journal articles and books. The Writing and Learning Centre has more resources to help you develop good quality academic writing, so check them out early in your first term, and ask for their short online note-taking course.

Your career

Advice and support

We're here to give you a head start in preparing for your future after graduation. We'll help you to:

  • Explore your options
  • Gain valuable experience
  • Progress your ideas and career plans.

Here are some tips to get you started in your first few weeks, or visit our Careers and Employability webpages for more information.

Get help finding part-time work and placement opportunities

Most students work part-time during their studies. The Careers team can give you advice on job hunting, applications and CVs through our Jobshop. MyCareer is your online portal for booking events, accessing appointments and guidance, and searching for jobs and placements.

Join clubs and societies or look out for volunteering opportunities

There are lots of opportunities to get involved in volunteering, student-led projects, and clubs and societies through The Students’ Union. These can help to boost your CV and build your skills while you give back and most importantly have fun.

Interested in freelancing or running your own business?

Our Bath Sparks support programme is designed to help our students and graduates create, share, develop and unleash their entrepreneurial ideas and ventures. The programme offers start-up grant funds, one-to-one advice, workshops, links to professional networks, and valuable exposure.

Get recognised for your activities by applying for a Bath Spa Award

Our Bath Spa Award helps you gain recognition for your efforts to make yourself more employable during your time at Bath Spa.

Follow us on social media

Keep up to date with our latest events and advice on Twitter, FacebookInstagram and YouTube.

Are you an international student?

The Immigration Advice and Careers and Employability teams work together to ensure that our international students and graduates are aware of all the opportunities and requirements when working in the UK during and after your studies.

Find out further information on our webpages.

Go global

Want to gain insights into a different culture, grow in ways you've never imagined, and make friends from all over the world? We encourage our students to broaden their horizons by venturing abroad.

Study abroad

Did you know you could study abroad as part of your undergraduate degree?

We're partnered with over 50 universities worldwide and the Go Global Team is here to support you throughout the process. Further information can be found on our webpage.

Global Citizenship course

This extra-curricular course is taken alongside your degree and designed to offer you a global perspective, as well broaden your horizons and improve your employability after graduation.

Meet and make friends with students from across different subjects and year groups! Find out more on our webpage.

Have your say

Unitu, the student voice platform

Unitu is an online platform where you can share your ideas and feedback with University staff, and quickly and easily get a response. The platform works like a virtual pinboard where you can post ideas, issues, praise or ask questions and then vote or engage in discussion with other students privately on anything raised. Academic Reps on your course can then make a decision to escalate any post to staff to get a response or request for action to be taken to resolve something. Unitu is accessed via Minerva, our Virtual Learning Environment.

You'll receive an email from Unitu explaining how to activate your account shortly after you arrive - if you have any questions about getting set up, just contact studentvoice@bathspa.ac.uk and someone will be able to help.

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